Heinkel HE.115.B1.

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Kittyhawk

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This aeroplane is for a customer who only ever orders WW11 German aircraft from me, and the more obscure the better.
Since I'd never heard of it this necessitated a bit of research and as it turns out the Heinkel HE.115 was universally considered to be the finest multi-role float plane of any side during the conflict. Torpedo bomber, mine layer, photo reconnaissance, air-sea rescue, it excelled in them all and was used by both the Germans and also the Allies who got hold of a few courtesy of some Norwegian pilots who escaped and flew them to England.
When modelling aeroplanes on a small scale there are details that you can omit without detracting from the overall appearance, but the ladders are not among them. They are a definimg feature of the HE115 and as such had to be included.
I am a complete novice with soldering, my knowledge being limited to which end of the iron to hold. (Not the hot end) So the ladders posed a problem.
A post to the forum asking assistance produced many helpful replies ranging from where to source materials, how to set up the work, how to solder such fiddly little bits...the list goes on.. So I really do consider the model to be a joint effort between members. Thank you all.
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Fine work as usual!

How did you do the ladders in the end?

Chunky wings too! Must have been quite slow! Is it a fair bit bigger than a mozzie?
 
This aeroplane is for a customer who only ever orders WW11 German aircraft from me, and the more obscure the better.
Since I'd never heard of it this necessitated a bit of research and as it turns out the Heinkel HE.115 was universally considered to be the finest multi-role float plane of any side during the conflict. Torpedo bomber, mine layer, photo reconnaissance, air-sea rescue, it excelled in them all and was used by both the Germans and also the Allies who got hold of a few courtesy of some Norwegian pilots who escaped and flew them to England.
When modelling aeroplanes on a small scale there are details that you can omit without detracting from the overall appearance, but the ladders are not among them. They are a definimg feature of the HE115 and as such had to be included.
I am a complete novice with soldering, my knowledge being limited to which end of the iron to hold. (Not the hot end) So the ladders posed a problem.
A post to the forum asking assistance produced many helpful replies ranging from where to source materials, how to set up the work, how to solder such fiddly little bits...the list goes on.. So I really do consider the model to be a joint effort between members. Thank you all.
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Superb work Kittyhawk. Without being patronising, your work gets better & better Sir!

And YES please, echoing a post above, go on, tell us, how DID you do those ladders in the end! They look perfect.
 
Great work - again.
By coincidence the HE115 has just come up in a book I'm reading; 'Target Tirpitz'. It's an aircraft I haven't come across before. Now I know what it looks like without having to Google it.
Brian
 
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And YES please, echoing a post above, go on, tell us, how DID you do those ladders in the end! They look perfect.
Nothing more than following the advice received.
One post suggested a ceramic tile would make a good surface to solder on, and I had a couple left over from a recent home renovation. With a glass cutter I scored the tile surface with a line for the ladder upright and then six lines at right angles to it at 6mm centres for the rungs. The upright (0.51mm brass rod) was taped down with masking tape over its line and the rungs then positioned one by one over their respective score lines and soldered on. The assembly was then lifted off the tile and the other-side rung ends dressed with a fine mini file to make them exactly in line against a straight edge. Then stuck back down on the tile again and the other side ladder upright soldered on. The set up was easy but the soldering required perseverance, not I suspect because it was difficult but because I hadn't done anything like this before and I had to learn a lot of stuff about tinning, using the iron, adding tiny slivers of solder to joints as required etc. All based on help received from forum members. There were a few disasters along the way but got there in the end and very pleased to have learned a new skill.
 
Given the level of skill and attention to detail you put into all your models, there was never any doubt you would overcome the problem of how to make the ladders. The model is superb as always. When he wants a Bf110 with the full night fighter radar, making the antennae will be a doddle :)


Now THAT (or the Ju 88 or He 219) I would really like to see - in 1/144th scale of course!
 
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