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Johnny65

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Hi Guys,

Just purchased my first bandsaw, a used Elektra Bekum BAS 315.

Firstly I know nothing about bandsaws and have never used one, so there might be a few daft questions to some of you, but please bear with me.

I'm only going to use it for cutting the corners off logs as I only make bowls so its usually quite thick and only rough work.

What thickness of blade and TPI would anyone recommend, and or, a make and supplier of blades. I don't know the history of the blades that came with it so I'd rather replace them.

Its 2 speed so should I use it on slow or fast speed ?

I'm giving it a good clean and oiling tomorrow, I've watched a few YouTube videos on how to set it up, so there may be further questions.

Cheers John.
 
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Orraloon

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For what you want to do go for a low tooth count like 3 tpi. That saw will likely struggle to tension a wide blade so keep them to 1/2'' or less. For bowl blanks taking off the corners is all you need and a lot less strain on the saw and the blades than cutting round blanks.
I am sure that now you have a bandsaw you will find a lot of other stuff to do with it .
Regards
John
 

Richard_C

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I've recently got a Bandsaw, learning as I go. Tuffsaws is the go to place for blades, and their website has helpful advice. UK made. The one I got recently was non standard length but was despatched within 4 days.

3 or 4 tpi, 1/4 inch or 3/8 inch sounds about right for what you want.

I went from the standard 6tpi 1/2 inch which came on the machine to a 3/8 4tpi and the difference cutting blanks was very impressive. Like you, it's about getting the corners off rather than heading for display-rack pergection.

The 6tpi did give a very nice finish though, doubtless good for some yet to be decided work.

Worth reading the Axminster blade buying guide and check out some of the Axminster "Wednesday workshop" you tube videos perhaps, even though yours is not an Axminster machine the how to stuff is good.

I think low speed is mainly for metal cutting with a different blade.
 

Johnny65

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Progress report :- , all cleaned and lubricated, blade guide all bearings shot, ordered delivery tomorrow, new blade ordered delivery tomorrow, table surface rust polished off.

Will the new blade need realigning on the wheels or should it just swap over without any adjustment?

Will the blade guides need adjusting every time a new blade is fitted, and or, will the blade guide need adjusting over the lifetime of the blade.

Thanks for previous comments.
 

powertools

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Hi Guys,

Just purchased my first bandsaw, a used Elektra Bekum BAS 315.

Firstly I know nothing about bandsaws and have never used one, so there might be a few daft questions to some of you, but please bear with me.

I'm only going to use it for cutting the corners off logs as I only make bowls so its usually quite thick and only rough work.

What thickness of blade and TPI would anyone recommend, and or, a make and supplier of blades. I don't know the history of the blades that came with it so I'd rather replace them.

Its 2 speed so should I use it on slow or fast speed ?

I'm giving it a good clean and oiling tomorrow, I've watched a few YouTube videos on how to set it up, so there may be further questions.

Cheers John.

I am not sure that I understand what you mean by cutting the corners off of logs.
On a band saw if you are cutting anything that is round in cross section you need to support it in a sled to stop it from twisting.
 

gregmcateer

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I am not sure that I understand what you mean by cutting the corners off of logs.
On a band saw if you are cutting anything that is round in cross section you need to support it in a sled to stop it from twisting.
If it's anything like me, it's taking e.g. a square block or plank, then cut off corners to make square into an octagon. Top and base flat. (Or half log placed bark side upwards, pith side face down on table, then cut to octagon as before).
 

Johnny65

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All new bearings fitted to the blade guides top and bottom, new blade yet to arrive.
I might be 65 but, kid with a new toy springs to mind, couldn't resist trying it with the old rusty 8 TPI blade that came with it on an offcut of 3 inch square fence post, surprisingly enough it cut like a knife through butter, and the blade didn't jump out at me, so I think I may have set it up about right, more luck than judgement methinks.
 

Richard_C

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You asked if the new blade will need realigning. Maybe, maybe not but you should back off the blade guides and check carefully by rotating the wheel by hand a good few times as it settles. Might depend on your particular machine, my experience is limited to just one but the principles seem pretty standard.

If the blade doesn't run true and the blade guides end up in contact with the kerf of the blade (the sticky out sideways bit at the front of each tooth, run your fingers along to feel it - machine off of course) it can damage the blade. Tension and alignment can sort of affect each other. Check that it's running reasonably true by hand, then with motor running, before you adjust the blade guides.

First blade fit took me a patient 30 + minutes while I worked out how all the adjustments interacted. Blade changes and set up take a lot less now.
 
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