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Dust Extractors again

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woodborg

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I am currently looking at two dust extractors for use on my wood lathe and bandsaw. I only use one machine at a time so the air volume doesn't have to be to high, but high enough.
The two i'm looking at are the Trend T30AFL £133.98

and the Record RSDE2 for £145.98


Please could you give me some feedback on these two models and tell me if you think one or the other would be good for a hobbist

TIA
Mark
 

martyn2

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:D i have just got a vac from B&Q with a power out let and tools to conect to most tools it is a 1250 watt if you use it with a triton dust bucket you have 2 dust inlets on the buckett so you will only need on vac :D

martyn
 

OPJ

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I'm very tempted to get a cheap B&Q vac also. After searching the forums, I came across a topic from Philly.

But can I just ask how you manage with a planer-thicknesser for example, which will have a 100mm or 4" outlet?
Personally, I find having to clear out the shavings regularly a real pain.

That's why I'm tempted to go for a Record one, personally. And I've noticed D&M Tools have the following deal:

http://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php?s ... n=RPWRSDE2

The price doesn't offend me like some I've seen, plus I spent more than double that on the Perform planer-thicknesser in the summer. I reckon it might do just fine for me.
 

Alf

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Folks, learn from my mistake. I went with a High Pressure Low Volume Axminster WV1000 under the mistaken impression it'd do what Axminster claimed for it. i.e. Extract everything. After many years of suffering atrociously bad extraction from the P/T, this Crimbo I was given a Perform High Volume Low Pressure one (now discontinued I see - that's a worry... 8-[ ) and it's night and day. The HPLV is now hooked up to my other Christmas pressie to deal with the fine dust from the bandsaw and SCMS and it's in its element. The moral of the tale being there is no cure-all extractor for all tasks and my experience suggests the Record wouldn't be particularly good extracting from the P/T.

Woodborg, not sure about the lathe, but either of those should cope with the bandsaw okay.

Cheers, Alf

Who can genuinely say her Christmas present really sucks. :wink: :lol:
 

Barry Burgess

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A visit to the Bill Pentz site would have saved you all a lot of trouble.
The 63mm option is just not good enough and with high volume chips 150mm is used. Most of the so called dust extractors (bagged option) are the biggest blowers of fine dust in the workshop. Cyclones( mini) attached to vacuums(the bigger the better 2000W) do work with the low volume chip/high dust content but the big cyclone using 150mm & 100mm hose is required in most cases to remove the high volume chip dust combinations.
 

Freetochat

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I went for this extractor. It is connected up to about 15 metres of 63mm pipework and pulls everything that I throw at it from tablesaw, spindle moulder and planner/thicknesser. 100 mm or 150 mm pipework would be better, and I will change it when funds allow. It is also in the Rutlands sale at £174.99. A good price.
 

Barry Burgess

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Freetochat":15mmw58a said:
I went for this extractor. It is connected up to about 15 metres of 63mm pipework and pulls everything that I throw at it from tablesaw, spindle moulder and planner/thicknesser. 100 mm or 150 mm pipework would be better, and I will change it when funds allow. It is also in the Rutlands sale at £174.99. A good price.
Other than the dust below 2micros which is the most dangerous
 

woodborg

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Hi thanks for all the advice in the end i went for;
SIP 01342 DUST EXTRACTOR / CHIP COLLECTOR with a 1hp motor. Taking on board what has been said i shall also buy a resperator/face sheild for the really small stuff.
Can you reccommend some and if you've seen a good price on one please post me a link :p
Mark
 

Barry Burgess

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Freetochat":32avijhg said:
Other than the dust below 2micros which is the most dangerous
What is your point?
With the 63mm hose the fine dust is not collected as the flow rate is too low.
You would have to wear a respirator. With 100mmm and a 2/3HP motor the rate is enough for a single/small double garage workshop with blastgates.
With MDF most of the fine dust is 0.5micro is is not good for the lungs
 

Freetochat

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Barry - your comment as it stands is incorrect. Efficient dust extraction is achieved by a combination of systems, and there is not one system that will cover all and especially in this question where a lathe is involved. Whilst an increase in duct diameter will improve airflow, this is only in conjunction with an extractor that can provide this. When using a lathe you can only hope to draw as much waste as possible, and for total safety have further air filtering such as the microclene, and by wearing an airshield type helmet.
 

Barry Burgess

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Freetochat":2s2r85nq said:
Barry - your comment as it stands is incorrect. Efficient dust extraction is achieved by a combination of systems, and there is not one system that will cover all and especially in this question where a lathe is involved. Whilst an increase in duct diameter will improve airflow, this is only in conjunction with an extractor that can provide this. When using a lathe you can only hope to draw as much waste as possible, and for total safety have further air filtering such as the microclene, and by wearing an airshield type helmet.
I agree with you that an airshield does help but the problem is that most available dust extractors do not sperate the chips from the fine dust.
I use a vacuum based mini cyclone for some of the hand tools ( dust creators) and a 3HP cyclone based system for the main shop extraction. All of the hobby dust extractors that have extra filter extraction have too smaller filter to be effective. It requires about 15 - 20m2 per HP of motor while most of the UK systems supply 5m2 in total which restricts the airflow.
I do not have a lathe but with custom made 150mm pipe connections (3HP cyclone) most chips and dust should be removed. 63mm will not help - 100mm would also fall short i would think. The only problem with my airshield is remembering to wear it.
Bill Pentz uses a 5HP motor and a 14" impellor which is over kill but sure creates the airflow to remove both chips and fine dust.
 

special bone

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Just to clarify, will most extractors collect the smaller particles but then spit them out the other side, or do they not even pull them in?

If they do collect them, could you vent the extractor outside? Might need a few of the old "gaffer tape" connectors but it's not beyond possibility.

Rich
 

Barry Burgess

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special bone":nvid4up3 said:
Just to clarify, will most extractors collect the smaller particles but then spit them out the other side, or do they not even pull them in?

If they do collect them, could you vent the extractor outside? Might need a few of the old "gaffer tape" connectors but it's not beyond possibility.

Rich
Most pull them in and spit them into the top bag of the extractor but the bags let the air and fine particles out. If you don't care about the neighbors and who else breathes the dust you can cut a piece of MDF to fit into the top of the extractor and fit the 100mm pipe to that leading to the exterior
 
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Picking up on Alf's point about the Axminster WV1000, I have a Record RSDE3 which looks similar. It copes will with the output from my 10" P/T. It leaves a few stray shavings on the floor & table, but the work is clear and that's what's important. It also has the filtration to cope with fine dust.

Downside is the noise compared to an induction motor HVLP system. Also when reducing the 4" hose to a power tool hose it is necessary to vent the suction slightly to prevent the bag disappearing up its own orifice! There is a hole in the Record pipe sleeve to allow for this.

Certainly does the job.

Richard
 
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Why not suck out all the nice warm air from your workshop in the depths of winter, only to replace it with cold air coming in under the door?

Richard
 

Adam

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woodborg":3rb46i4c said:
Has anyone tried this method, venting ouside. Would this be better than just buying a fine dust extractor?
Mark
Yes. The whole extractor is in its own hut outside.

richardthewood":3rb46i4c said:
Why not suck out all the nice warm air from your workshop in the depths of winter, only to replace it with cold air coming in under the door?
I find the amount of time spent with a dust extractor running is very limited in total workshop time, and when it is, its normally with a large machine running which generates heat, and also their is normally some residual heat in the workshop as you tend to have it warmed after the preperation time prior to starting machining.

For the small(ish) amounts of time when extractors are running, you are normally picking up and feeding items through a thicknesser, or cutting timber etc so you don't notice a bit of a drop in temperature, and I think its well worthwhile from a health point of view of fine dust not being circulated around the workshop.

It may help my workshop is small, so only a limited air space. In reality, I don't notice a signficant drop in temperature at all.

Adam
 
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