Dust extractor…

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Rogimag

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Hi All, I purchased a dust extractor when I lived in Canada and brought it back home with me to the UK once my posting had ended. The machine has only been used several times in Canada and is a 220 volt machine. On my return I changed the odd shaped plug on the end and tried to get it going here only to find that it keeps blowing my popper fuses. So as i see it I have 2 options available;

1. Scrap the machine. (I really don’t want do that!!
2. Exchange the motor.

OR….Do I have a 3rd option…ie is it possible/is there a way to have the motor rewired to our 240 volt system in UK? Apparently the 220 volts is 2 x 110 volts wired together to make the 220 required for Canada. That’s all I can tell you. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated please! TIA.. Rob…
 

Inspector

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The 220V is just a handy way to say the voltage. It can be 208 through 240 depending where you live here so the motors can take it. You have likely wired it wrong or need to get the switch rewired. If the motor was good here there is no reason it would kack in England.
Welcome to the forum by the way.

The only thing you might notice is it will not suck as much air as when here due to the 50/60 hertz thing. The Asian motors for us and you are the same. They just put a different data plate on them.

Pete
 

DBT85

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Have you checked the wattage on it? My 2200w extractor (big bag type) will pop 13a fuses for lunch which is why it needs a 16a plug.

However my 2000w dual motor cam actually style is fine on a 13a.
 

Sachakins

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If you checked wiring is correct, earthing correct, then as DBT45 has said it is likely due to current draw at start up causing the trip, as standard mcb breakers can't handle the prolonged high current draw.
There are various mcb types, allowing different current spikes to occur, Type B, Type C etc

I am no electrician, but here is a brief guide worth reading, but I would consult a qualified electrician before changing anything.
This can be found at

Class B trip curve
The MCB with class B trip characteristics trips instantaneously when the current flowing through it reaches between 3 to 5 times rated current. These MCBs are suitable for cable protection.

Class C trip curve
MCB with class C trip characteristics trips instantaneously when the current flowing through it reaches between 5 to 10 times the rated current. Suitable Domestic and residential applications and electromagnetic starting loads with medium starting currents.

Class D trip curve
MCB with class D trip characteristics trips instantaneously when the current flowing through it reaches between Above 10(excluding 10) to 20 times the rated current. Suitable for inductive and motor loads with high starting currents.

Class K trip curve
MCB with class K trip characteristics trips instantaneously when the current flowing through it reaches between 8 to 12 times the rated current. Suitable for inductive and motor loads with high inrush currents.

Class Z trip curve
MCB with class Z trip characteristics trips instantaneously when the current flowing through it reaches between 2 to 3 times the rated current. These type of MCBs are highly sensitive to short circuit and are used for the protection of highly sensitive devices such as semiconductor devices.
 

Orraloon

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My understanding is that 220v in The US and Canada is 3 phase while 240v in the UK is single phase. At the very least that would mean changing out or rewiring the switch on the machine. So as with all advice involving sparky related things get an electrician to have a look. Also as DBT85 pointed out the wattage will be a factor.so you may need to upgrade the power supply.
An electrician is what you need.
Regards
John
 

Inspector

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220v here is single phase in homes, mostly for stoves, clothes dryers, electric hot water and electric heat the rest of the house being 110v. Three phase is in commercial/industrial settings. Sometimes if your home is near commercial/industrial areas you can pay extra for three phase.
Pete
 

DBT85

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Inspector I only recently found out that you all have 220v already, it's just that to get it you need to use a different breakers that covers both 110v legs. Still not sure why 110v is the default though.
 

HamsterJam

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220v here is single phase in homes, mostly for stoves, clothes dryers, electric hot water and electric heat the rest of the house being 110v. Three phase is in commercial/industrial settings. Sometimes if your home is near commercial/industrial areas you can pay extra for three phase.
Pete

Think it is referred to as ‘split phase‘ where there are two 120v feeds 180degrees out of phase. Low power equipment (lights, TV, etc) can be fed at 120v by wiring across one feed and neutral. Higher power equipment is fed at 240v by wiring across both feeds.
Using the higher voltage draws less current to deliver the required amount of power.

In the case of the OP‘s dust extractor, it should just be a case of wiring the 220/240v input between the UK live and neutral (and the earth/ground to the earth of course).

 

Orraloon

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220v here is single phase in homes, mostly for stoves, clothes dryers, electric hot water and electric heat the rest of the house being 110v. Three phase is in commercial/industrial settings. Sometimes if your home is near commercial/industrial areas you can pay extra for three phase.
Pete
OK I sort of get the picture. Does that mean that a 220v plug has 2 live wires?
John
 

Rogimag

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Thanks to all you guys, you are all awesome! I’ll try and get it sorted and let you know the outcome….Rob.
 
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