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Disston , Before and after

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AndyT

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A bit too much Brasso there for my taste but the handle looks a lot better. What did you use in the end?
 

Blister

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What did you use in the end?
2 Coats of Danish oil cut back with 0000 steel wool between coats , then some microcrystalline wax
 

condeesteso

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I know, Andy, but it will calm down, just needs some air to it :wink:
Very nice... how is the blade?? If that is good, straight no kinks then well done!
I keep meaning to find myself one mainly to have a go sharpening it, but distance buying (ebay) is too big a risk on the blade I feel. (I know from experience).

edit: by the way... was talking to a bloke recently about his 1948 Ferguson (yes, a tractor :lol: ) and admiring the patina on the engine cover which was originally bare steel sheet and had acquired a fine sheen of heat-treated oxidation over many years. He told me the lengths some go to to replicate that finish, ridiculous lengths indeed.
Andy's concern may be that some of that stuff comes off quite easily but cannot be replaced. This is just a side-note - a fine saw indeed.
 

Scouse

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Lovely job, I kinda like the shiny brass, but as Douglas says it's sometimes a shame to take a chunk of history out.

With that in mind Jimi recommended MAAS polish to me for my little Groves dovetail, bit less abrasive than Brasso apparently... haven't tried it yet, it's still behind two Disston D8s in the queue!
 

Cheshirechappie

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There's a sort of ongoing debate in the 'heritage' world about conservation vs. restoration.

My opinion, for what it's worth, is that tools were made for using. There comes a point in the life of a tool, when abuse and neglect have taken their toll somewhat, that a full overhaul is justified to make the tool work well again. There are some things that should be stuffed and mounted in museums - Roman artifacts, say, or Anglo-Saxon chieftains' helmets - and for those, conservation is right. However, tenon saws are not so rare that they need to be stuffed and mounted in museum cabinets; indeed, they are best preserved by using them for their intended purpose, and with that in mind, restoration is not only appropriate, it is desirable.

Blister - that looks an excellent restoration. A fine tool can now give another couple of lifetimes' service.

In passing, what's the toothcount? I'll have a guess at 12tpi crosscut....
 

jimi43

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Scouse":1377g38z said:
Lovely job, I kinda like the shiny brass, but as Douglas says it's sometimes a shame to take a chunk of history out.

With that in mind Jimi recommended MAAS polish to me for my little Groves dovetail, bit less abrasive than Brasso apparently... haven't tried it yet, it's still behind two Disston D8s in the queue!
I think we are back to the realms of taste..collector's opinion and who actually owns the tool.

My view is somewhere between the "cleaner" and the "collector"....I recommended MAAS because, if used carefully, it retains the patina of years of oxidization and hand acid....but gets rid of the "gunk".

Like this...



But you will be surprised in a few weeks how your saw will patinate but be clean.

The only thing I will say about polishes...they will remove the definition in any marks and etchings...MAAS tends not to do that...



I take it this will be a user Allen...there are a few Disston saws around and relatively cheaply (though not a quid!)....I'd get it sharpened up and use it...as I do with little Robert....

And stick some Tru-Oil on the handle...I didn't realise Pedder used it...but it doesn't surprise me...and if it's good enough for the Meister...then it's good enough for me! 8)

Jim
 

condeesteso

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Didn't know Pedder used Tru-oil either. So that's it then. Things of beauty, those handles (Klaus does the handles of course, so fair do's)
2L.jpg
 

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TobyC

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This is not an early 'collectible' Disston, it's post WW2, which is still good, but not valuable. By all means use it, and don't think you're damaging some museum piece. The nuts should be nickle plated, so if you clean them they will be shiny. Nice job on the cleanup, the wood is beech, the early ones are apple. Is there any etch left on the blade?

Toby
 

Blister

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Is there any etch left on the blade?
Very little , I can just see the last 2 letters " ON " at the end of an arched text
 

RogerP

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condeesteso":3tn306pn said:
Didn't know Pedder used Tru-oil either. So that's it then. Things of beauty, those handles (Klaus does the handles of course, so fair do's)
View attachment 2
... and here's the inspiration that handle :) (H.G.Long & Co.)

 

condeesteso

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Indeed Roger, I didn't mean to imply the form was original. It's more in the choice of woods, and the detail and finish. In fact I have a Gramercy dovetail with a very fine handle and of similar detail form - there are notable differences with the (nice though it is) Long shown. The vintage tool experts would doubtless come forward with other examples but no-one pretends the shape is new.
 

RogerP

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condeesteso":3282ttu4 said:
Indeed Roger, I didn't mean to imply the form was original. It's more in the choice of woods, and the detail and finish. In fact I have a Gramercy dovetail with a very fine handle and of similar detail form - there are notable differences with the (nice though it is) Long shown. The vintage tool experts would doubtless come forward with other examples but no-one pretends the shape is new.
Douglas I was, perhaps too obliquely, referring to a thread I started a while ago concerning my saw. https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/dovetail-saw-who-was-mr-grimes-t53773.html.

If you scroll down you'll see Pedder's responses. :)
 

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