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paulc

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Without spending more than £60 is it possible to get a decent four piece chisel set and if so what are the best brands?
 

Alf

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Paul,

Like Tom says, what sort? Bench? Paring? Firmer? Bevelled? Turning? Carving? Framing? Cranked? The world of chisels is a large, varied and confusing one :D

If it's bevel edge bench chisels then the Kirschen set Tom linked to is a bit of a bargain and well thought of.

Cheers, Alf

Itching to move this to the hand tools board, but it could be turning so I best not - yet :?
 

sawdustalley

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:arrow:

The chisels shown from axminster are pretty decent, I was lucky enough to have santa bring me a set this year for one of my woodworking related presents.

Depends what you need them for, they are cabinetmakers chisels - if you are on a building site they may not be too good
 

Bean

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If you are looking for some for site use try Footprint.I'm sure I saw some with bright orange handles.........Hard to lose. Not bad steel either.

Bean
 

Steve

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The Kirschen set Tom recommended at Axminster is superb. They really hold their edge well, the handles are beech and the entire chisel is polished. Fantastic value at £54 for six.
 
A

Anonymous

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Steve":2p3l6wqa said:
The Kirschen set Tom recommended at Axminster is superb. They really hold their edge well, the handles are beech and the entire chisel is polished. Fantastic value at £54 for six.
I bought these recently (see other posts) and you will not be disappointed.

For paring chisels the Crown range from Axminster have served me well

T
 

WOLF

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in my honest opinion it is the honed edge that you put upon your chisel that "makes" the tool what it is, as "bevel" edges will come and go depending upon your own choice of what you do and how you wish to use them.. and as for brand, well the better the steel , the longer the edge you have put on the chisel will last, that is about all, we have chisels over 30 yrs old in my work shop, which will see me out of this life time, and also some "cheapies" which may just last a year or two, they all shave/cut the same, just the cheapies will require a lot more honing more often...
if you intend to use the chisels with a mallet, get "FIRMER" chisels, for hand use only, use bevel edged/paring chisels(one and the same for those who do not know!!) or even mortice chisels, heavy duty for actual mortising work, or the lighter ones for general joinery!!!
regards matt :lol:
 

Alf

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WOLF":21mi8phc said:
bevel edged/paring chisels(one and the same for those who do not know!!)
Hi Matt, 'fraid that's not the case at all. Chisel terminology is a pretty confused area, but you'll find you can (okay, could - the joys of progress :( ) get both bevel edged and firmer style paring chisels. I know, 'cos I have both. Most of the old bevel-edged chisels you see are in fact bevel-edged firmers; quite a sturdy cross-section although not intended to be hit with a mallet. This is further confused by modern bevel-edged chisels that are intended to be hit with a mallet, but whose cross-section are more like a standard square-edged firmer. In effect the bevel is more like just knocking off the corners, rather than a genuine bevel which reduces to almost nothing at the edges. After all that waffle, what it boils down to is a chisel can be decribed as bevel-edged, but you're no nearer knowing what type of chisel it actually is. Although it won't be a mortise chisel (either sash or oval bolstered)... :D

Cheers, Alf
 

Chris Knight

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And if you have got this far and want to try really fine edged, bevel chisels suitable for delicate dovetails or paring, or really square-sided firmer chisels suitable for walloping then good luck finding them!

Neither style seems to be much made these days and you will have better luck rust hunting than looking for a new tool.
 

WOLF

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alf/moderator, a question for you!!! what exactly do you do as a profession!!!!! as you seem to of purposly left it off of your profile!!!!
 

WOLF

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try this for ref: the chisels- alf http://www.screwfix.com/talk/thread.jsp ... 0&tstart=0 and i would appretiate your comments

and for ref i have been involved in timber for most of my natural life, i also own a workshop(with staff and apprentices) along with 2 woodworking based companies.. one deals with the national trust and heritage work,replicating long since departed work/workers items like "rude screens" for churches.. the other makes bespoke furniture (hi-grade offices-directors desks etc)and other timber based products.(one off stairs sash windows etc).and have full order books until mid 2005 for both companies and will be celebrating 25yr of trading this year!!!!! so i may just have a slight bit of knowledge to my/our (my craftsmen-both carpenters, joiners and cabinetmakers) credit!!
kindest regards matt
 

Alf

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Matt,

I'm afraid I'm absolutely not going to go down the road of "who knows more"; the "woodworker for money" as opposed to "woodworker for pleasure". It's been done before and gets us precisely no-where. You believe your information to be correct, I believe mine to be. My purpose of posting that info wasn't to say "ya boo, you're wrong", but simply so that anyone reading the thread could have both opinions and make up their own minds. That's how this forum works.

If it helps, my information is based on 20 years of woodworking, 4 years of buying and selling old tools, and the recognised reference book on identifying woodworking hand tools; "The Dictionary of Woodworking Tools" by R A Salaman, amongst others. FWIW, I can't find "a bevel edged firmer paring chisel" anywhere but in your post.

Cheers, Alf
 
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