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Building a dust extractor system (Part 1)

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Adam

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With the purchase of my tablesaw, I also added a dust extractor to the list. Given the limited space in the workshop, it became clear I was going to have to mount it externally - and hence decided to add a small extension to the workshop.

I set aside a Saturday to complete the task, but did manage to get the basic frame done on Friday afternoon after work - this picture shows the basic frame


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I've opted for the same construction tecnhique as the main workshop - 4 x 2's for the frame, onto which featheredge will be added.

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It's getting dark now, so time to give up for the evening (much to the relief of the neighbours no doubt, whose house wall is just 2 foot from the back fence ;-o

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It's been raining overnight, but it's dry, and I'm ready to start. The camera has been set to take pictures every 5 minutes throughout the day - to create a time-lapse movie. For this post however, I've split out some of the key images to .jpg.

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I'm using 110mm waste pipe to form the basis of the system. My intention is to take a single tube through into the workshop, then divide it to the individual machines once inside.

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For both noise, and weatherproofing I'm adding a layer of roofing felt over the entire structure.

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I need two sections to cover the distance from floor to ceiling. I'm wrapping all the way round to minimise the number of gaps in the felt.

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Next step is to make the hole through into the workshop for the pipe. I used a marker pen to draw round the pipe, then a jigsaw to cut the circle.

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Ahh, this is more like it, a rest, cup of tea, and quick snooze.

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It's onto the roof now, a piece of outdoor ply.


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It's not very clear but I've finished most of the main structure. I'm nailing on featheredge using a Paslode cordless nail gun. These are fantastic provided A) The gas is within it's best before date (and if they don't have a best before date, then they really are old and almost certainly won't work DAMHIKT) and B) You measure to check the brads you are using aren't going through the featheredge, felt, and stud frame so they stick out inside. <insert embarrased look on my part here>. Fortunately I did notice before I got too far and swapped to shorter lengths. I'm also wearing safety goggles!

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With the sides all finished, and (hopefully) watertight, I'm finishing the roof. I'm using cold-tar (warmed in hot water to make it easier to spread) to stick down the roofing felt as this side of the workshop faces directly out to sea and the wind can be fierce at times.

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Although not very clear from the photos it's starting to get dark now, I've been on the go since 8am this morning and am quite tired. I'd like to get it watertight before dark. I've cut some plywood to size for the door. The angle at the top is right, but it's still too long. I like plywood doors as they don't sag, and are quick to construct. The door sits into a recess to assist in both noise reduction and (mainly) to assist in waterproofing.

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Quite dark now, but nearly finished! Adding the hinges for the door.

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Finally finished! It still needs painting, and electrics, but it's watertight and ready for the extractor.

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Here we are the following morning, the extractor fits in (phew!), and you can see the horizontal pipe ready for connection. One particular benefit of keeping the extractor outside is that any fine dust that makes it out of the dust filter isn't circulated into the workshop, but stays in the outhouse. If you are considering this (an external system), you must not do it if you have a house boiler in which the exhaust fumes may be dragged back into the house/workshop - it brings the carbon monoxide in. I use electric heaters so it's no problem in my case.

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Inside the workshop, the pipe is immediately divided into two with a 'T' section. (This can be seen between the two black strips). The lower section is connected to the table saw, and the upper to a floating pipe which gets dragged all over the place as and when required. This system is not ideal, and I shall be posting my bank holiday exploits about mounting a proper system inside shortly.


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I do have an .mpg / .avi file of the entire construction but my normal photo site won't allow it as it's a movie file. If anyone has storage space they can direct link to - and can store a ~300kB file, I'd be very grateful. Please drop me a note.

Adam
 

Johnboy

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Very interesting. I am planning to do something very similar but intend to insulate the walls to help sound deadening.

What have you done to get all the air that you are sucking out of the workshop back in again, the heat loss will be tremendous if this warm air is not reintroduced to the workshop wont it? I intend to bring the air back through a fine filter, haven't worked out the details yet.

johnboy
 

Adam

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Ahh, I have such a small workshop that I happily sacrifice the entire volume of heated air, and a small heater, + my body heat has the workshop toasty again in just a minute or so. I also find that it doesn't matter at all during the day, and during the summer. It's only a problem in winter, really, and the amount of time you spend running power tools is actually very low. Besides the heat is in fabric of the building? If you were intending to return the air, I think you would struggle to get a good seal around the door/structure in general. I think the amount of returning air would be very minimal.

Adam
 
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