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Biscuit Cutters (Router)

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Anonymous

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Hello all, any tips for using biscuit cutters with a router fixed to a table, anything I should watch out for as I've not used either a biscuit cutter proper or a router bit made for the purpose ?

Thanks.
 
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Anonymous

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I've the Perform set and its done what i've needed it to so far...

I also use it for cutting slots in the frame for buttons to hold down tabletops...
 

Alf

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Welcome to the forum, Charles.

The main thing I can think of is keep your biscuits dry. Other than that the two "you probably already know that" things would be the fact that the router cutter won't cut in one plunge like the BJ, but needs a side to side slotting motion (marks on the router table fence required I believe) and secondly, don't plan to do any T joints (for obvious reasons). :D

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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I'm going to be using the Perform bit also but if I remove the main fence and use the mitre fence instead, bringing the work to the bit from the side will it cut in one go to the required depth ?
 

Midnight

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Charles...

a one step cut shouldn't be a prob; the cutter will be limited by its' guide bearing. If you're using your mitre fence to support and guide your stock, try to add an auxiliary fence to it just to give a larger support area...
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks for the tip. This is a new way of joining boards together for me so I don't really know anything about the biscuits themselves, is there a difference in the types of wood they are made of, should I use one type over another ?
 

Noel

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As Alf mentioned, keep the biscuits dry in a sealed container as they are hydroscopic, and will suck any moisture from the air and swell. Then it's microwave time.

Rgds

Noel
 
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Anonymous

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Actually, you can make T-joints if you use a 4mm straight router bit to cut the bit in the top of the T...

I did this until I bought myself a B/J. It's a bit of a pain to get things lined up, but I made my router table this way a few years ago, and it held together really well.

Be careful not to try and cut too much in one go with the 4mm bit though - it's liable to break quite easily. And yes, I learnt this from experience (although with a 6mm bit).

AG
 

Philly

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Charles,
Only other hint is this-Always reference the correct face/edge against the table. Sounds obvious, but if you are edge jointing instead of finding the exact centre of the boards, roughly set the router to height but run all the boards through with the SAME FACE DOWN/UP.
That way the boards will come out flat.
Hope I explained that clearly(ish) :lol:
Cheers,
Philly
 

Alf

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Afterglow":2nxpasr7 said:
Actually, you can make T-joints if you use a 4mm straight router bit to cut the bit in the top of the T...
Well yes, I suppose so. :roll: But wouldn't you end up with rather a big space at the ends? Is that a Good Thing? Or maybe a What The Heck It Doesn't Matter Thing? :? And does anyone really care? :lol:

Hmm, good question about which biscuits. Anyone have any preferences?

Cheers, Alf
 
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