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Axminster Chuck - what jaws should I get?

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RickG

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Hi all,
I've bought an Axminster Sk114 chuck. I don't have any jaws yet to fit it. What would you recommend as a start off?

AI already have a Charnwood Viper 3 chuck. The jaws I have for this will give me an external size of 47mm. So I'm thinking this will be good for the smaller work and use the Sk114 for bigger things.

Or am I completely wrong?

All words of wisdom will be welcomed.

Thank you.
 

RickG

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I should also add; I've a birthday coming up, so I'm wanting to know what I should ask folk for as gifts - thus I'm thinking of jaws for the chuck
 

CHJ

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You need to identify what you intend to attempt in your turning journey, the jaws you need are the ones that make things easiest to mount your intended forms.

The diameter of the accessory jaws are only marginally controlling what size you can turn, your existing chuck & jaws holding on a sound spigot or socket will hold a 300 mm blank.

Varying sizes (diameter) and form, Larger Dovetail, Spigot, Gripper etc. come into play to increase stability when you move into more out of balance or awkward to mount blanks.

Standard C type, and Cole jaws would give you a very wide range and the ability to reverse turn bowls.

Remember the 80mm C type jaws will fit the chuck and be more or less the equivalent of your existing chuck jaws, and you may find them more versatile for smaller items. (they are my main go-to's for the items in my gallery for instance.)
 

Dalboy

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As already stated it is one of those things that you buy as you need. Start with the basic jaw size I believe it is the c jaws with axminster and as you progress buy to your needs.

The jaws that I use most are small jaws to hold things like pen blanks and very small spindle pieces, I have three sets of standard jaws two for the robert sorby chucks and one axminster c jaws for larger bowls I have some 3 1/2" jaws. Cole jaws for reverse turning smaller bowls.

I have 4 chucks so the 4 most used jaws are set upon them.
 

RickG

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Many thanks Chas and Dalboy, for your thoughts. I'm new to turning and don't anticipate turning anything very large. I expect most of what I do will be less than 7" in diameter. What I've turned so far has been boxes, small bowls, cord-pulls and lidded pots/bowls.
The reason for getting the Axminster chuck was to have a 2nd chuck without having to change jaws all the time yet have capacity for things a little larger and use the jaws in expansion mode.
What I have also thought of doing is, as a friend has done: get largeish jaws and make nylon blocks of different sizes to give soft jaws to hold smaller items.
With the Viper chuck I've also found the piece I'm working on is prone to slip in the jaws when I get a catch. Would this be less likely to happen with a better chuck?
 

CHJ

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Following on from Derek's comment about having the luxury of multiple chucks.

These are my daily use jaws set up similarly.
Left to Right.
Top: Cole Jaws. used with several additional home made buttons to augment standard soft buttons. ( Ignore engineering 3 Jaw, specialist use only, not safe to use on soft woods).
80mm C Type
100mm C type.
100mm wood jaw plate.
100mm Pin/spigot.
Steb style Drive centre mounted in engineering stepped jaws, (external & Internal) chuck used for specialist holding for light turning loads with safety support.
chucks2.jpg
 

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Paul Hannaby

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The jaws I use most are
C jaws - good for bowls and general use
Gripper jaws - good for spindles / vases / hollow forms
O'Donnell Jaws - Smaller bowls, boxes and short spindles

I rarely use cole jaws (and never for reversing bowls) so I would put them way down the list.

Depending what size your lathe is and what you use it for, you might decide other jaws are needed - eventually you end up with a full set! :)
 

Lazurus

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The O`Donnell jaws with several inserts are a brilliant and versatile set, I use these most as by changing the insert covers most sizes you will require.
 

Dalboy

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Paul Hannaby":1atg6a7y said:
I rarely use cole jaws (and never for reversing bowls) so I would put them way down the list.

:)
Just a note on what Paul mentioned when I do use my cole jaws I tend to bring up the tailstock for added security otherwise I will jam chuck
a piece for taking the foot off.
 

Paul Hannaby

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phil.p":2eivoh44 said:
How do you reverse bowls? Jam chucks?
I usually just use a wooden mandrel held in the chuck, a pad between that and the inside of the bowl and then use the tailstock to keep the bowl pressed against the mandrel. It works for pretty much any size bowl - you just make a mandrel to suit! I have less than 6 that work for 99% of what I do. Occasionally I make a special one for an awkward project!

I also have a vacuum chuck but I don't usually bother to set that up for just one bowl.
 

Simon_M

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My "suggestion" is to get:

  • 1. Axminster C jaws
  • 2. Screw chuck in C jaws
  • 3. Axminster O'Donnell 38mm jaws
  • 4. Axminster Type M jaws
  • 5. Longworth Style Chuck

Axminster C Jaws is useful for 95% of woodturning (for me).

Screw chuck for starting off bowls and creating a tenon/spigot etc.

O'Donnell 38mm jaws gets the workpiece away from the chuck, with very good access and also copes with slightly smaller workpieces.

Type M jaw is for slightly bigger "reversed" pieces. But the C jaws would do for almost anything.

Longworth Style Chuck fits in the C jaws for cleaning up the base of bowls etc. a bit of a luxury so not really needed.

If I was on a dessert island (with 230 volts) and only had one set of jaws, it would have to be the C jaws.
 

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