Ash Dieback

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Trevanion

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Pembrokeshire
Been spending a few nights now dealing with the ash trees we have on the land that overhangs the road and telephone wires a little bit, I hadn't had any experience cutting dieback trees until now but it's been quite interesting as well as a bit depressing. We're dealing with them ourselves as a bit of pre-emptive action as the council has been going around marking trees with dieback and the giving people notices saying something along the lines of "You have two weeks to deal with the trees, if they are not dealt within that time we will cut them down and bill you for them at £500 per tree minimum" I'm not sure how true that actually is or not but I've heard it from a few people now that I trust. So, late nights when no-ones about, get the chainsaw out 😁

Even though there are some new shoots on the branches, once you've cut into the branch the majority of the timber inside is dead and rotten, it's fairly solid feeling but there is quite heavy spalting in some branches as though it had been on the ground for a long time and the fungus had got to it. I can now see why they say that the branches are very brittle and liable to snap onto the roads now, if these trees had rotten any further they definitely would've been rather dangerous overhanging the road and the telephone wires. Another thing was one of the more dead trees had what I could only really describe as diamond-shaped eruptions in places in the end grain a bit like a bad heart shake which I hadn't seen in a standing tree before. I should've taken photos but I didn't think to.

The tree branches over-hanging the wires came down in sections off a ladder for the most part without too much fuss, main trunks cut and dragged off the stump high up avoiding the fairly new wire fence with a rope and 4x4. Two trees we managed fell completely without pruning the branches off but once they hit the ground it was almost like a grenade had gone off with all the rotten sticks flying everywhere, never seen anything like it.

It's depressing, we've done 8 trees so far and there's a few more to go that aren't on the immediate road that also need dealing with really. Funnily enough, the only ash tree I can see that doesn't seem to have it and is pretty healthy at the moment is a tree that accidentally had a gallon or so of heating oil leak into the ground around it years ago and it was ill for a very long time but now it's definitely the healthiest tree here. I don't think there will be many ash trees left once it's run its course.
 
I was looking at several ash trees this weekend at my parents place in Lincolnshire which we fear may have it. There are definite dead areas in the trees. Luckily they are on a field to field boundary rather than on the roadside.
 
Trevanion do you think any of the timber is useable? We've a few trees here that need to come down and I was hoping to salvage some timber for turning but it doesn't sound hopeful from what you describe.
 
Trevanion do you think any of the timber is useable? We've a few trees here that need to come down and I was hoping to salvage some timber for turning but it doesn't sound hopeful from what you describe.

The main trunks themselves seem alright but I think we've caught them early enough, it was just the majority of the branches that were rotten and had spalting running in them, although that timber may still be desirable to some.
 
Its all over Pembrokeshire now.

Its really sad. Only sycamore left now as a standard tree
 
You might want to double check as I was refused taking away some that had been cleared by the council lads. they said normally I could have what I wanted but as it was diseased it had to be taken to be certified burnt. But that is a Scottish council
 
Trevanion do you think any of the timber is useable? We've a few trees here that need to come down and I was hoping to salvage some timber for turning but it doesn't sound hopeful from what you describe.
You will be fine on the main trunks
 
I have two ash trees on my boundary. One looks OK the other, which is very large, is not showing any signs on the leaves but the canopy is very thin this year. I am not sure if it is due to die back or the very dry spring. I will probably have to wait 'till next year to find out. The large one will be a pain to get down if it is die back as access is not easy..
 
think they have geneticaly modified Ash to eleviate this prob....
some tree's have been immune....they are bringing on sapplings...
results wont show in my life time tho....
so sad...what ever next ?
 
I have a large old tree overhanging my land but right on the boundary of that and a main A road, it looks healthy to me but no doubt the highways department will be looking at it. I'd be saddened if it needs to be felled.
 
We have many Ash trees in our garden and they all look healthy, two of them are used to hang a hammock between, they definitely will be staying, because of the lock down this is the first summer we have stayed the UK for a few years and realised the Oaks have overgrown and need some of the main branches taking off, we are in Kent, any offers.
 
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We've got a lot of sick/dead ash trees here in Sussex. I'm pleased to see that there are some that seem not to be susceptible - in a group you can see healthy and sick ones alongside each other. I think that there is a certain amount of natural genetic diversity amongst ash trees which is helpful. I'm strongly against prophylactic felling - mainly for this reason - other than within falling distance of roads/footpaths/buildings of course (it's all about the targets!).
 
I wouldn't dream of suggesting that you don't know what you are doing, but pruning trees from a ladder is one of the more exciting ways to put yourself in casualty. I have had more than one brown trouser moment, usually when someone messes with the gravity control at just the wrong moment. You think you have every eventuality covered, and then...


 
You should have seen the size of some of the ones marked for felling at Westonbirt last year.
I have just milled a massive one phill that is over 450 years old.No ash die back but needed felling back last year due to the location.I will post some pics later on as milling today more of it.
 
I wouldn't dream of suggesting that you don't know what you are doing, but pruning trees from a ladder is one of the more exciting ways to put yourself in casualty.

I’m a professional TN, professional...

859A8298-77A2-4C51-9EE4-79B27DF88E94.jpeg


It would be even more funny if it wasn’t genuine 😂
 
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I wouldn't dream of suggesting that you don't know what you are doing, but pruning trees from a ladder is one of the more exciting ways to put yourself in casualty. I have had more than one brown trouser moment, usually when someone messes with the gravity control at just the wrong moment. You think you have every eventuality covered, and then...
You had me yelling, "No, just NOOOO!" at the screen" But it always goes better if you aim at the camera...

... mind you it remains a mystery why God allowed some Americans to have opposable thumbs.
 
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