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and i thought making dovetails was hard

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thetyreman

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flying haggis":besifldj said:
https://youtu.be/cQyOa6RSIWM



why?
agree, it would be faster to it by hand in my opinion, weird how he makes jigs and modifies drill bits, by the time he'd have angle grinded that spade bit I'd have already sawn the tails.
 

Trevanion

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It's a very interesting looking joint, but I doubt it would be all that strong without the glue as the hoop part of the joint would split out on the short grain if any serious force was applied. But that would never happen in regular use anyway.
 

Trevanion

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MikeG.":3bjs9ds7 said:
Because it could be made by a machine, quickly.
Just looked up the machine itself since I didn't catch a date from the video, it dates from 1870 :shock:

Just had a quick look through my copy of "Woodworking Machinery, It's Rise, Progress and Construction" by M Powis Bale 1914, there's no mention of the Knapp machine from what I can see but it does mention a machine from the same period, the "Armstrong Dovetailer". (Not my images, stole them from Vintage Machinery.com :))





I guess the Brookman machines must've revolutionized the industry when they first come along. Going from a few hundred a day, to a few thousand.
 

Rorschach

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thetyreman":1udnkuql said:
flying haggis":1udnkuql said:
https://youtu.be/cQyOa6RSIWM



why?
agree, it would be faster to it by hand in my opinion, weird how he makes jigs and modifies drill bits, by the time he'd have angle grinded that spade bit I'd have already sawn the tails.
Yes you might have sawn the tails, but once he has made the jigs and the tools he would beat you hand cutting everytime.
 

Rorschach

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flying haggis":1hnuj00r said:
https://youtu.be/cQyOa6RSIWM



why?
Why not? Is this another lets shame someone who dares do something a little different thread?
 

MikeG.

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He took days to make that jig, and the resulting joint was nothing special. However, it was an interesting exercise, and showcased an interesting piece of engineering history. That was the point.....not a race between man and machine.
 

thick_mike

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And it looks cool.

Pask is great by the way. Creative thinking outside the box. He likes problem solving more than woodwork I think.

I agree on the weakness of narrow cross grain in that joint, but you can’t deny it looks great.
 

rafezetter

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It does look cool - but FlyingHaggis has to remember this is content from a youtuber - quite a lot of stuff I see from makers should be regarded as "not necessarily practical in the real world - but I'm doing stuff like this because you'll pay me for doing it".

Pask has for the most part made things that are eminently practicle, but he gets paid no matter what he does (from views and patreon), so why not play around with stuff like this?

He obviously saw that joint someplace and thought "I'll have a lash" (have a go) and did, because he could.

This is how stuff gets invented, people messing around with stuff for the sheer curiosity of it - FH might want to remember that next time he uses his toaster or vaccum cleaner.
 

marcros

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I have seen this joint before, and if I remember it dates a piece of furniture to a period of about 10 years. I thought it was about 1890-1900, but it may well have been a bit earlier as suggested earlier in the thread at about 1870.

Then machine made dovetails took over.
 
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It's about the entertainment for the viewers, and the challenge for the creator.

Nothing to do with speed of manufacture or quality of the joint.
 

MikeG.

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transatlantic":10j4x248 said:
It's about the entertainment for the viewers, and the challenge for the creator.

Nothing to do with speed of manufacture or quality of the joint.
This copy, yes.......but the original was about mechanising a piece of work which had previously been done by hand, the corner joint. And there, obviously, it was about the speed and quality of the joint.

I sometimes speculate about what would happen in my workshop if I committed to producing Youtube videos. From the current situation where I work in bursts, project by project with gaps in between, I would have to timetable work to even out the flow/ video content. So the spontaneity and enthusiasm would go, replaced by the new predictable routine and the monotony of treating your workshop as a job. No thanks.
 
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MikeG.":316n3hm7 said:
transatlantic":316n3hm7 said:
It's about the entertainment for the viewers, and the challenge for the creator.

Nothing to do with speed of manufacture or quality of the joint.
This copy, yes.......but the original was about mechanising a piece of work which had previously been done by hand, the corner joint. And there, obviously, it was about the speed and quality of the joint.

I sometimes speculate about what would happen in my workshop if I committed to producing Youtube videos. From the current situation where I work in bursts, project by project with gaps in between, I would have to timetable work to even out the flow/ video content. So the spontaneity and enthusiasm would go, replaced by the new predictable routine and the monotony of treating your workshop as a job. No thanks.
I was responding to the "Why"


I think some of the better youtubers are those that do it as more of a hobby.
 

SamTheJarvis

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The "why" for the video existing is there's money in making videos about unique types of joinery. The "why" for the joint is it's easily machined and is strong enough for small items.
 
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