Workshop side door

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Hsmith192

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Advice on making a workshop door? ( in progress)

Obviously security is so important especially with our tools and workshops. I’m making a door from c16 and c24 timber, I get a good feeling with the mortises but I just wanted to get some advice on making it high security?
I have a five lever mortice lock so I’m just wondering what else I could/should do to make it secure and better than what I’ve made so far?
 

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One or 2 more rails? I find mortice locks secure to be honest(does anybody ever pick a lock?) Inside opening is much more secure and a Birmingham bar.
 
As @Jonnyb said but I think he meant to say outward opening? being more secure, stops them smashing the door inward, and yes to a mortise lock, even the best padlock won’t last a minute against a grinder or bolt croppers.
I always fit Jamb bolts into the edge of the door so that even if they attack the hinges the door is still secure. (coach screws with the heads cut off)
If you fit strap hinges always use coach bolts as well as screws.
I agree about thieves not picking locks, and a 5 lever will usually be better made than a 3 lever also if you need to claim on insurance a 3 won’t cover you.
If this side door is in addition to main front doors secure the front ones from the inside with a bar dropped into brackets, like they used to do on castle doors.
I really don’t want to think about how many breakins and attempts I have suffered over the years, so I speak from experience.
Ian
 
I always fit Jamb bolts into the edge of the door

Ian , could you explain more please, I can't visualise this. I need to make some workshop doors and would like to make them as secure as is practical. Thanks
 
Ian , could you explain more please, I can't visualise this. I need to make some workshop doors and would like to make them as secure as is practical. Thanks

Some people call them hinge bolts, they go on the hinge side in the edge of the door to add a bit more security. One way of breaking in is to remove the pins out of the hinges, hinge bolts mean even if you do this you still can't gain access.

You can buy them like this

https://www.screwfix.com/p/smith-lo...HxFOroaAfN7Qx9L9YYAaApdyEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Or some hinges have them built in

https://www.screwfix.com/p/smith-lo...XL52qggD_f3aS80KpQEaAoVZEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
 
Ian , could you explain more please, I can't visualise this. I need to make some workshop doors and would like to make them as secure as is practical. Thanks
Hi, it’s a cheap and easy way to protect doors from attack to the hinges which is sometimes an easier way to break in than going for the locks.
You will need a couple of carriage screws, say 2 1/2” or 3” these are screwed into the edge of the door on the hinge side leaving them stuck out about an inch, the next thing is to cut off the heads of the screws and close the door so that the cut ends mark the positions on the door frame. Then drill holes in the frame to accept the protruding shanks. Job done.
Ian
 
@SimonB other ways to make workshop doors more secure are, don’t have a traditional letterbox, they can use that to cut horizontally though the door allowing them to open the top or bottom of the door that isn’t then locked!
Galvanised tin sheet can be carriage bolted to the face of the door to prevent attack.
Best of luck.
Ian
 
If this side door is in addition to main front doors secure the front ones from the inside with a bar dropped into brackets, like they used to do on castle doors.

I have metal up and over doors. A quick and easy way to improve security is to drill c. 8mm through the side, the metal return, below the pivot point and continue the hole into the wooden frame. Insert a pin of some kind, I use tent pegs, invisible from outside. After a bit I painted the top of the pegs red, the number of times I forgot about them and cursed the door that refused to open.....
 
Advice on making a workshop door? ( in progress)

Obviously security is so important especially with our tools and workshops. I’m making a door from c16 and c24 timber, I get a good feeling with the mortises but I just wanted to get some advice on making it high security?
I have a five lever mortice lock so I’m just wondering what else I could/should do to make it secure and better than what I’ve made so far?
On a slight tangent, I would suggest wireless door contacts with a loud alarm. You can add more wireless devices (contacts and PIR detectors). Some companies do battery systems which stay powered for a couple years on one set. Get hold of a broken, disused CCTV camera and screw it up in a obviously viewable position. Deterrents work.
 
I did mean inward opening because you can always see the lock sash unless its stormproof. A Birmingham bar helps prevent inward kicks. Accoya is reckoned brittle on a security door.
 
On a slight tangent, I would suggest wireless door contacts with a loud alarm. You can add more wireless devices (contacts and PIR detectors). Some companies do battery systems which stay powered for a couple years on one set. Get hold of a broken, disused CCTV camera and screw it up in a obviously viewable position. Deterrents work.
A loud alarm, yes I have a Master Blaster in my workshop, designed to be so loud it’s disorientating and believe me it is, all you want to do is get out of there! BUT you do have to remember to hide the ear defenders.
Ian
 
I agree that Lathams doors are good, if you're doing a wooden door then a deadbolt in both top and bottom halves is a good idea as is a steel strip coach boletd to the door to cover the gap between the door and the frame as this protects the deadbolts, or at least acts as an additional pain in the butt for the burglars and so may put them off. Hinge bolts are a must.
 
If it’s a wooden building then don’t bother too much with door security as they will go through the wall next to it - had a few buildings done over like this and they go for the short length panels.

Lathams doors are excellent for brick buildings, only thing to remember is they also lock top and bottom and your cill needs a decent hole to receive the bottom bolt.
 
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