Workshop Flooring Options

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Puggers

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Hi,

Having recently relocated, we've bought a house with an 3m x 6m garden studio which after some finessing will become my workshop, this being an upgrade from the garage at our last house. It's log cabin style with plaster-boarded internal walls over insulation, with the ceiling to match.

The floor is also wooden and covered by a pretty basic thin carpet over underlay and before I finish the fitting-out, I need to make a decision on the floor covering which is where your experiences would help.

My initial thoughts were to use a flat rubber matting which will be durable and enable me to run any tools or cabinets on castors over it pretty easily. In addition, this would hopefully afford me some fatigue mitigation which is important as I have long-term issues with my lower back and calve muscles. I've all but decided against the interlocking gym mat style as whilst they may have the comfort factor at around 12mm thick, I can't envisage them lasting that long with any items moving across them on wheels and their "bouncebackability" maybe limited.

That's taken me down a route of looking at stable mats which come in sheets and can be purchased at 10mm thickness upwards - they're not cheap but they're clearly durable and have a smooth finish. I've also been shown some samples of a contractor level vinyl flooring (used in shop fitting) which is 7mm thick but I'm questioning whether the clear durability far outbalances the additional need for comfort when standing on it for a long while.

Of course, I could simply replace the carpet in the communal areas with something like contractor Berber type tiles (which will be a right pain to get the dust and shavings off) and then use a matting such as the ones in gyms against the benches but I don't want to create a trip hazard where the two meet, albeit, I could raise the floor where the 5mm carpeting lies to match the 12mm mats, but that seems like a lot of effort if there are more sustainable options out there.

This isn't a money's no object exercise but equally I want to try and do it once and do it right.

Any opinions on alternative solutions through personal experience would be welcomed. Thanks in advance.
 

mikej460

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I'm also pondering this question and have considered interlocked mats and horse mats so would be very interested in others' views
 

Blackswanwood

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There are some views here.


I have caberfloor also.
 

Puggers

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Thanks Blackswanwood, I had looked through the forum and read the 2016 post - ironic that fresh comments were only posted earlier today.

I’m familiar with Caberfloor at a high level only but a quick look at its properties don’t suggest to me that it will have the fatigue application I was looking for. If I’m wrong, please shout.

I’m looking for something that will go over the existing boards.

As the post goes back nearly 5 years, I was hoping some new stuff might be recommended but it could well be a case of what’s always been used is still suitable.

I appreciate you replying, many thanks.
 

Blackswanwood

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A friend of mine does up landrovers and has antifatigue matting from BigDug in front of his bench and machines. I just texted him to check where he got it from and he also suggested looking at a company called ecotile who he says do commercial garage and factory flooring.
 

Dave Moore

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Hi,

Having recently relocated, we've bought a house with an 3m x 6m garden studio which after some finessing will become my workshop, this being an upgrade from the garage at our last house. It's log cabin style with plaster-boarded internal walls over insulation, with the ceiling to match.

The floor is also wooden and covered by a pretty basic thin carpet over underlay and before I finish the fitting-out, I need to make a decision on the floor covering which is where your experiences would help.

My initial thoughts were to use a flat rubber matting which will be durable and enable me to run any tools or cabinets on castors over it pretty easily. In addition, this would hopefully afford me some fatigue mitigation which is important as I have long-term issues with my lower back and calve muscles. I've all but decided against the interlocking gym mat style as whilst they may have the comfort factor at around 12mm thick, I can't envisage them lasting that long with any items moving across them on wheels and their "bouncebackability" maybe limited.

That's taken me down a route of looking at stable mats which come in sheets and can be purchased at 10mm thickness upwards - they're not cheap but they're clearly durable and have a smooth finish. I've also been shown some samples of a contractor level vinyl flooring (used in shop fitting) which is 7mm thick but I'm questioning whether the clear durability far outbalances the additional need for comfort when standing on it for a long while.

Of course, I could simply replace the carpet in the communal areas with something like contractor Berber type tiles (which will be a right pain to get the dust and shavings off) and then use a matting such as the ones in gyms against the benches but I don't want to create a trip hazard where the two meet, albeit, I could raise the floor where the 5mm carpeting lies to match the 12mm mats, but that seems like a lot of effort if there are more sustainable options out there.

This isn't a money's no object exercise but equally I want to try and do it once and do it right.

Any opinions on alternative solutions through personal experience would be welcomed. Thanks in advance.
Hi,
Rubber matting might be available if you contacted a company that replaced conveyor belting. Normally there is some that’s perfectly acceptable for your use and you could be free.
 

sneggysteve

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Hi,

Having recently relocated, we've bought a house with an 3m x 6m garden studio which after some finessing will become my workshop, this being an upgrade from the garage at our last house. It's log cabin style with plaster-boarded internal walls over insulation, with the ceiling to match.

The floor is also wooden and covered by a pretty basic thin carpet over underlay and before I finish the fitting-out, I need to make a decision on the floor covering which is where your experiences would help.

My initial thoughts were to use a flat rubber matting which will be durable and enable me to run any tools or cabinets on castors over it pretty easily. In addition, this would hopefully afford me some fatigue mitigation which is important as I have long-term issues with my lower back and calve muscles. I've all but decided against the interlocking gym mat style as whilst they may have the comfort factor at around 12mm thick, I can't envisage them lasting that long with any items moving across them on wheels and their "bouncebackability" maybe limited.

That's taken me down a route of looking at stable mats which come in sheets and can be purchased at 10mm thickness upwards - they're not cheap but they're clearly durable and have a smooth finish. I've also been shown some samples of a contractor level vinyl flooring (used in shop fitting) which is 7mm thick but I'm questioning whether the clear durability far outbalances the additional need for comfort when standing on it for a long while.

Of course, I could simply replace the carpet in the communal areas with something like contractor Berber type tiles (which will be a right pain to get the dust and shavings off) and then use a matting such as the ones in gyms against the benches but I don't want to create a trip hazard where the two meet, albeit, I could raise the floor where the 5mm carpeting lies to match the 12mm mats, but that seems like a lot of effort if there are more sustainable options out there.

This isn't a money's no object exercise but equally I want to try and do it once and do it right.

Any opinions on alternative solutions through personal experience would be welcomed. Thanks in advance.


I bought one these back in November and very pleased. Very strong and easy on the legs and feet.

 

Puggers

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Hi,
Rubber matting might be available if you contacted a company that replaced conveyor belting. Normally there is some that’s perfectly acceptable for your use and you could be free.

I hadn't thought of this, Dave so will make some enquiries - many thanks
 

Puggers

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I bought one these back in November and very pleased. Very strong and easy on the legs and feet.


I'd trawled through the auction sites previously, Steve but not seen this particular one which seems to offer samples too. Larger orders are pallet delivered which would be useful so I'll make contact and see what stock they have as the advert suggests it's limited.

Thanks for the tip-off
 

Delwood

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I'd trawled through the auction sites previously, Steve but not seen this particular one which seems to offer samples too. Larger orders are pallet delivered which would be useful so I'll make contact and see what stock they have as the advert suggests it's limited.

Thanks for the tip-off
Make sure you can sweep across as well as along the embossing. I made the mistake of using corrugated rubber matting and it is a pain sweeping out from under the lathe.
 

Shane1978

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Hi,

Having recently relocated, we've bought a house with an 3m x 6m garden studio which after some finessing will become my workshop, this being an upgrade from the garage at our last house. It's log cabin style with plaster-boarded internal walls over insulation, with the ceiling to match.

The floor is also wooden and covered by a pretty basic thin carpet over underlay and before I finish the fitting-out, I need to make a decision on the floor covering which is where your experiences would help.

My initial thoughts were to use a flat rubber matting which will be durable and enable me to run any tools or cabinets on castors over it pretty easily. In addition, this would hopefully afford me some fatigue mitigation which is important as I have long-term issues with my lower back and calve muscles. I've all but decided against the interlocking gym mat style as whilst they may have the comfort factor at around 12mm thick, I can't envisage them lasting that long with any items moving across them on wheels and their "bouncebackability" maybe limited.

That's taken me down a route of looking at stable mats which come in sheets and can be purchased at 10mm thickness upwards - they're not cheap but they're clearly durable and have a smooth finish. I've also been shown some samples of a contractor level vinyl flooring (used in shop fitting) which is 7mm thick but I'm questioning whether the clear durability far outbalances the additional need for comfort when standing on it for a long while.

Of course, I could simply replace the carpet in the communal areas with something like contractor Berber type tiles (which will be a right pain to get the dust and shavings off) and then use a matting such as the ones in gyms against the benches but I don't want to create a trip hazard where the two meet, albeit, I could raise the floor where the 5mm carpeting lies to match the 12mm mats, but that seems like a lot of effort if there are more sustainable options out there.

This isn't a money's no object exercise but equally I want to try and do it once and do it right.

Any opinions on alternative solutions through personal experience would be welcomed. Thanks in advance.

What did you go for in the end? Im in the process of making the same decision.
 

Puggers

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Shane, I went for stable matting in the end from our local equestrian suppliers as they did free delivery and helped me lug them to the workshop. I paid £48 apiece for 6x4.
Their weight offsets any movement where I butt them up to each other although where I’ve cut them and the join is short (around a bench leg for example) I glued them on the edge.
They’re very similar to those in the link provided above but I just bought local.
I did buy 4 of the gym mats to test out - they were good enough but as above, I was a little concerned about long-term durability.
Cost difference between the two was negligible.
Let us know how you get on.
 

Shane1978

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Shane, I went for stable matting in the end from our local equestrian suppliers as they did free delivery and helped me lug them to the workshop. I paid £48 apiece for 6x4.
Their weight offsets any movement where I butt them up to each other although where I’ve cut them and the join is short (around a bench leg for example) I glued them on the edge.
They’re very similar to those in the link provided above but I just bought local.
I did buy 4 of the gym mats to test out - they were good enough but as above, I was a little concerned about long-term durability.
Cost difference between the two was negligible.
Let us know how you get on.

check out these options what do you think?:


14mm rubber/resin tiles
www.ebay.co.uk

Rubber Gym Floor Tiles | Heavy Duty 14mm Thick Interlocking 900 X 900mm for sale online | eBay
Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Rubber Gym Floor Tiles | Heavy Duty 14mm Thick Interlocking 900 X 900mm at the best online prices at eBay! Free delivery for many products!
www.ebay.co.uk

OR

15 or 20mm gym mats (polyurethane)
www.gym-flooring.com

15mm Sprung Rubber Heavy Duty Gym Tile
Our Sprung Rubber Gym Matting Is Perfect For Home Gyms & Commercial Gyms. Browse Our Full Range Online Now & Get Free UK Shipping Over £250.
www.gym-flooring.com
www.gym-flooring.com

OR

10/11mm EVA foam mats
Interlocking EVA Foam Workshop Mat Set 1200 x 1800mm | MIC1218 | 1 Year Guarantee | Sealey
Hard-wearing EVA foam anti-slip matting suitable for use in the workshop and machine room. Interlocks to make any length in units of 600mm. End section edges to prevent damage.
www.sealey.co.uk
www.sealey.co.uk
 

Inspector

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I have a wood floor with nothing on it. I used to work on concrete and found good boots was the best way to have happy feet and sometimes a change to a second pair mid-shift helps if you have foot problems. I found the anti fatigue mats that were soft were worse than bare concrete. Because of the give you sank in a bit and they would push on the arch more where the harder ones don't give as much so keep the pressure where it belongs. One thing I did find was that all mats made it hard to roll tool boxes and carts with parts. For that reason I won't put mats across a shop floor. If at all it would be localized to the front of a machine or bench. If you are moving machines etc due to space constraints just stay with the wood floor and skip the rubber.

Pete
 

Puggers

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Based on my experience, Shane, the first two options look decent. If I was looking again, I’d probably consider the first one initially. I’ve used Ark Solutions for other needs before.
I don’t have any items that need regularly moving around and so it’s worth bearing in mind Pete’s experiences too.
Cheers
 

MatMan

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Hi!

Sorry I'm late to the party, but wanted to offer some info in case it helps anyone else with the same problem.

Rubber Stable Matting - If it's good enough for horses, it'll be good enough for some trolleys and toolboxes. The advantages of this matting are that it is very durable and firm, so you can have a solid-enough surface to roll trolleys or sit on a stool without worrying too much about the matting damaging. The thickness will also provide good insulation, especially if used on a concrete floor, for better comfort. The downsides are that the solid rubber won't be the best for anti-fatigue properties and it can be quite expensive if covering a large area, although it will also be a long-term solution so stable matting could be worth the investment if it sounds right for you.

Studded / Dotted Rubber - A cheaper solution could be to use a rubber floor covering such as Studded Rubber Flooring. The 3mm or 4.5mm thickness options mean it won't offer anything in terms of anti-fatigue properties, you will also need to use an adhesive to attach it to the floor or else the edges could curl or lift. However, it will be a much cheaper way to cover a floor with a more grippy surface and it will have some "bounce" if you drop tools on it or have to kneel. To make the standing more comfortable, you could then use a standard anti-fatigue mat and just place it on top of it. For value, I'd recommend the AtEase Pebble Mat which is great for dry areas (woodworking and general crafts). For wet areas or metalworking matting tips, please feel free to ask.

PVC Tiles - Similarly to the Studded floors, the tiles are designed to be a floor covering product. They are normally around 4.5mm thick and made from rigid PVC. They provide fantastic durability in wet and dry areas, and are often used in professional car maintenance workshops. The interlocking design makes them the quickest and easiest to install in most cases. They'll probably work out slightly more expensive than the studded rubber flooring, but may well be cheaper than the stable matting. It's just a question of whether you want a completely firm floor (PVC tiles) or something slightly softer (Rubber). Again, you could simply place a standard Anti-Fatigue mat by your workstation. Lots of places sell these, so will be worth shopping around for the best deal.

I hope this info helps. Let me know if you have any more questions or need clarification on anything.
 
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