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Richard S

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I'm taking a second look at a workshop on Friday and I'm pretty sure it will do the job but I am unsure about the electrics. Currently power is connected through an old type cartridge fuse box. I would like to be sure that the system is capable of having additional lights and sockets fitted as well as a 16amp circuit. What determines the amount of power available?. If the feed is direct from a meter is it just a case of updating he fuse box to a modern RCD/MCB type with enough of he correct breakers for he circuits I need or as I suspect am I about to open a can of worms. I suppose what I need to know is, is there a quick way to assess the current systems capacity?
Thanks in advance
Richard
 

mbartlett99

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Breakers/fuses are there to protect the wiring ie they are no indication of the systems capacity themselves - people often make a mistake of adding the existing breakers capacities together and assuming that is the safe capacity of their supply. The first thing is to check the size of the incoming cable - hopefully its written on an accessible section of the cable in mm2.
 

Rob Bacon

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You need to look at the head this is where the company cable comes in and the companys fuse is,and depending on what fuse rating is marked if it is a single phase 240volt supply it may be 60 or 100 amps. Also check out if the fuse holder is metal or plastic if it is plastic it a modern type, you would need to contact your supplier if you need to upgrade from 60 to 100 amp as they are responsible for this fuse it is quite simple for them change the fuse in the plastic type but they normally have change the older metal fuse holder.If you are altering the fuse board fuse board and the circuits this would need to be certificated and a copy given to supply company before or at the time supply upgrade. Hope this helps

Rob
 

Blister

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Is it not best to get a qualified sparks in to give a report on the current condition and what needs to be done for your intended use ?
 

foxhunter

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Blister":2n9wv9g0 said:
Is it not best to get a qualified sparks in to give a report on the current condition and what needs to be done for your intended use ?
I agree!

Any decent electrician should not charge for giving a quote.
 

Richard S

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Thanks again Guys, I will in due course get a sparks in to quote but initially I hoped to be able to quickly ascertain the viability of the workshop. I suppose in reality what I need to know is, is the power supplied to the meter always the same and only what happens the consumer side of that open to variation depending upon installation or am I being completely dense?
 

9fingers

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As has already been said, the total permissible load is governed by the board fuse fitted upstream of the meter.
You will have a similar installation in your house - so go and have a look at that so you know roughly what to look for.
Most likely the fuse will be 60 or 100Amp and this will be prominently written on the outside of the fuse carrier.
Unless you have some huge machine aspirations, then this should be enough.

Bob
 
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