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Wolf Drill Overhaul

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Fergie 307

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You need a gear pulled that will go under the gear and then push on the end of the shaft. Only other thing you could try is to tap some wooden wedges under the gear, between it and the casing, then tap the end of the shaft with a rubber mallet, emphasis on tap. If you don't have a puller then take it to your local garage and I dare say they will remove it for you.
 

Fergie 307

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If you need to remove the bushes, and they are in blind holes, there are two ways. Firstly proper blind bearing remover if you can find someone who has the right size. Motorcycle repairer is probably your best bet. Secondly turn a piece of dowel so it is a really snug fit inside. Now pack the thickest grease you have in the bottom of the bush, insert your dowel and give it a smart thump. If you are lucky the hydraulic pressure will cause the grease to pop the bush out. You can buy replacements at your bearing shop, or from somewhere like simply bearings.
 

Fergie 307

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Once you have the gear off I suspect that you will be able to tap the shaft out by hitting the threaded end. Be sure to use a piece of wood, or a plastic mallet so you don't damage the threads. Check there is no circlip or similar round the shaft, I doubt there will be, it is probably retained by the gear. There may be shims or a spacer, in which case make a note of where they go. Once the shaft is out you will have to remove the bearings. They are likely to have a retaining clip or ring.which will have to be removed first, this is often a very narrow wire clip which is easily missed if you are not sure what you're looking for. Once you are sure you have removed any retaining clips then you can tap the old ones out using an appropriate sized bar as a punch against the inner races. This will damage the bearings so you cannot reuse them, but there is usually no way of avoiding this. Again if you have any doubts post some more pictures once you have the shaft out. How you for the new bearings is very important so you don't damage them. I expect the bearings will be a sliding fit on the shaft, and an interference fit in the casing. If this is the case then you need to get a piece of tube fractionally smaller in diameter than the bearing outer race. Drive the new bearings in squarely and ONLY apply pressure to the outer race. depending on how they are fitted you may be able to use the old bearings to drive the new ones in. Don't on any account drive them in by applying pressure to the inner race or you will wreck them. Good luck and keep us posted how you get on.
 

dickm

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Fergie 307, those are brilliant instructions! Hope the OP can follow them and win. Only one suggestion to add, local agricultural engineers can also be helpful with removing bearings, though their kit usually starts one size too big for drills and the like. Don't ask me how I know this!
While you are in informative mode, any suggestions for removing the rear wheel of an old Atco ride-on which has rusted pretty solidly onto the axle???
 

dickm

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I used to tell my team, "What Intel gives you, Microsoft takes away" I can't type a letter any quicker on my Win 10, Office 365 than I could with Window 2 ( Yes 2), on a 286 with Wordperfect V4 or 5
Ah, but what about the WordPerfect that was on CPM??
 

keithy1959

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Thanks Guys. I've just ordered a puller as it will come in handy for another silly project I've just bought on ebay. I'll keep you posted !
 

keithy1959

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Fergie 307, those are brilliant instructions! Hope the OP can follow them and win. Only one suggestion to add, local agricultural engineers can also be helpful with removing bearings, though their kit usually starts one size too big for drills and the like. Don't ask me how I know this!
While you are in informative mode, any suggestions for removing the rear wheel of an old Atco ride-on which has rusted pretty solidly onto the axle???
They certainly are - it's given me the confidence to go through the next gate. I'll update as soon as I'm through it
Richard
 

Stevekane

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Hi, I know nowt about Wolf drills Im afraid but if your saying that there is a threaded shaft sticking up out of the gear with the key that youve uncovered by removeing the nut,, have you tried giving this shaft a few solid taps useing a brass drift so as not to damage the threads? I cannot see any shaft in the photo so forgive me if Ive got the wrong end of the stick. As to bronze bushes, if you do replace them it often helps if you either dip or at least pour very hot water over the alloy caseing, somtimes the the bushes will then just slip in, saves walloping them and having to tidy things up afterwards.
Good luck.
 

Fergie 307

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Fergie 307, those are brilliant instructions! Hope the OP can follow them and win. Only one suggestion to add, local agricultural engineers can also be helpful with removing bearings, though their kit usually starts one size too big for drills and the like. Don't ask me how I know this!
While you are in informative mode, any suggestions for removing the rear wheel of an old Atco ride-on which has rusted pretty solidly onto the axle???
always a problem. Really all you can do is keep dosing it with a lubricant. Diesel is as good as anything. Then judicious application of heat. I have loads of different pullers, so usually have something about the right size. If it is really bad then try a weak solution of phosphoric acid. This will dissolve rust very quickly, but the parts need to be grease free first so use cellulose thinner or something. Just be aware that cellulose thinner will remove most types of paint, so be careful. If this is an issue then use meths or pure alcohol. There is no magic answer I'm afraid. If you can remove the whole assembly then you might be able to press the shaft out. Have you got a picture?
 

Fergie 307

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Steve's advice 're hot water is good, you can also use a hot air gun, and put the bushes in a plastic bag in the freezer overnight. If they are oilites then when you first fit new ones they should be on the tight side, so able to turn but with some resistance. They run in quite quickly on first use, so if you have them silky smooth initially then they will be a little sloppy after they have run in. Just make sure they are well lubricated and run the machine slowly for the first ten minutes or so before you put it under too much load.
 

Fergie 307

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Once you get the gear off the shaft will probably be able to be tapped out through the front of the case. You will need to remove the key first, should be easy once the gear is off.Just double check that there isn't a retaining clip on the front bearing. Clean out any crud at the end where the bulbous part of the casting is. You should hopefully be able to see the bearing. If there is a retainer then it may be a regular circlip with ears on each end with holes or hooks for circlip pliers. Also common are wire clips, these are often only 1-2 mm in diameter and sit in a groove directly above the outer race, and have no protruding ends so they can be hard to spot. If you have this type then there will be a gap in it somewhere. You need to use a fine pick, or small screwdriver to pop one end out, then just slide the tool round to ease it out of the groove.
 

keithy1959

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Hi, I know nowt about Wolf drills Im afraid but if your saying that there is a threaded shaft sticking up out of the gear with the key that youve uncovered by removeing the nut,, have you tried giving this shaft a few solid taps useing a brass drift so as not to damage the threads? I cannot see any shaft in the photo so forgive me if Ive got the wrong end of the stick. As to bronze bushes, if you do replace them it often helps if you either dip or at least pour very hot water over the alloy caseing, somtimes the the bushes will then just slip in, saves walloping them and having to tidy things up afterwards.
Good luck.
I'm quite possibly using the wrong terms so bear with me !! the puller arrived in the post today, so I'm going to have a little play this evening when it gets a bit cooler.
Richard
 

dickm

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Really all you can do is keep dosing it with a lubricant. Diesel is as good as anything. Then judicious application of heat. I have loads of different pullers, so usually have something about the right size. If it is really bad then try a weak solution of phosphoric acid. This will dissolve rust very quickly, but the parts need to be grease free first so use cellulose thinner or something. Just be aware that cellulose thinner will remove most types of paint, so be careful. If this is an issue then use meths or pure alcohol. There is no magic answer I'm afraid. If you can remove the whole assembly then you might be able to press the shaft out. Have you got a picture?
Tried all those except phosphoric acid! It's actually now half off, with the aid of a ball-joint splitter from a new local classic car restorer, but it's *%!?^ stubborn! Have had to leave it for a while with other priorities, but the machine is now needed, so the pressure is on. Am tempted to cut the wheel down so it's possible to use the puller that was neededl for taking back drums off my various Volvo 120s. Nothing, but nothing, resists that plus a sledgehammer!
 

Fergie 307

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Tried all those except phosphoric acid! It's actually now half off, with the aid of a ball-joint splitter from a new local classic car restorer, but it's *%!?^ stubborn! Have had to leave it for a while with other priorities, but the machine is now needed, so the pressure is on. Am tempted to cut the wheel down so it's possible to use the puller that was neededl for taking back drums off my various Volvo 120s. Nothing, but nothing, resists that plus a sledgehammer!
You have my sympathy. Faced with a similar problem on I think a Westwood lawn tractor, we ended up having to cut the wheel off. Fortunately we were able to get hold of a replacement fairly easily. Just a question of deciding which part can be replaced and is therefore potentially expendable. Hopefully if it has started to move it will give up the fight!
 

keithy1959

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Well, it's all apart - no shims , springs or circlips, just two spacers and a ball bearing race. the two spacers are worn where the balls touch, so that's probably the up and down play. That's me off to our local bearing shop !!

IMG_20210616_204732.jpg

There appears to be 2 bronze bushings in the casing, one at the top and one at the bottom, and they are quite a tight fit on the shaft. I'm not sure if I should risk trying to tap them out, just in case I can't get replacements and damage them ??
IMG_20210616_204749.jpg
but I'm interested in what the grooves are at 12:00 and 8:00 - this is the bottom bush - any ideas what they are for ?

Any advice much appreciated

Richard
 

Fergie 307

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Really surprised it has bushes rather than ball races, but they clearly work. As Kathy 1959 says the grooves are there to keep grease in the bushes. If the sideways play in the shaft is acceptable then leave them, if not then they are easy enough to remove. Not sure you will find it easy to get grooved replacements, the modern way of doing this is that the bushes have numerous holes or indentations in the bearing surface to retain lubricant. Your bearing shop should be able to give you advice on this, and if you take it along will probably be happy to measure it for you. Most machines use standard diameter combinations. If you can't get the bushes ready grooved then any small engineering shop will be able to cut grooves into plain bushes for you, this is a simple job with a keyway broach. They should also be able to ream the bushes to size if required. They are very possibly phosphor bronze bushes, rather than oilites, again the bearing people can advise you. A new thrust bearing and washers should fix the endfloat. Nice simple repair in the end. Always very satisfying to give a nice old machine a new lease of life.
 

Stevekane

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Tried all those except phosphoric acid! It's actually now half off, with the aid of a ball-joint splitter from a new local classic car restorer, but it's *%!?^ stubborn! Have had to leave it for a while with other priorities, but the machine is now needed, so the pressure is on. Am tempted to cut the wheel down so it's possible to use the puller that was neededl for taking back drums off my various Volvo 120s. Nothing, but nothing, resists that plus a sledgehammer!
Ive had great success with Plus Gas on things like King Pins, if youve been able to get it to move perhaps a good squirt of Plus Gas and knocking the parts back on before trying again, Ive got difficulty visualising what your doing,,is it a wheel with built in hub onto a keyed shaft?
Steve.
 
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