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What tool to add to the collection next?

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m1ke_a

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New workshop is on order and I'll finally have a decent sized space to work fully under cover.

I've recently fallen into the Festool trap and now have a MFT3, TS55 and CTL midi :roll: :lol: . Also added a Makita 1/2" router to go with a 1/4" Dewalt. Other random kit includes a old Burgess BK3 band saw, a small Trend craft router table and a cheapy belt sander.

I'm intended on adding a fixed bench to link in with the MFT3 and was wondering what would make sense as a semi permanent tool?

My woodwork skillz are very limited and I don't see myself carving or turning wood so no need for a lathe. I'm most likely to focus on DIY type work, including kitchen cabinets, fitted wardrobes and so on.

I'm thinking router table / cabinet or a table or band saw.

I know the MFT3 was spank me expensive but compared to and old workmate and a limited run of kitchen worktop, it's been a real pleasure to use, and portable. I know I can get a table saw conversion for the TS55 but isn't the cheapest of options and I dare say I could get something better for less pennies.

Any suggestions?
 

Digit

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For cabinetry I would say, table saw.
Currently I'm rebuilding our kitchen and the TS produces the cut sheets, 18mm ply in this case, rabbets, grooves and face frames.

Roy.
 

Dibs-h

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m1ke_a":pg61a88c said:
My woodwork skillz are very limited..
You can't buy those in green and black. I'd concentrate on increasing and expanding those skills and buying tools as needs\jobs arise.

Otherwise you risk having a well kitted workshop producing nowt.

Dibs.
 

theturner

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I agree with Dibs, buy what you need when you need it
otherwise you will end up with an expensive load of junk.
Yes someone would take it off your hands but at a fraction
of its cost.
Roger.
 

m1ke_a

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Dibs-h":kwcc8imj said:
m1ke_a":kwcc8imj said:
My woodwork skillz are very limited..
You can't buy those in green and black. I'd concentrate on increasing and expanding those skills and buying tools as needs\jobs arise.

Otherwise you risk having a well kitted workshop producing nowt.

Dibs.
:lol: Know what you're saying though I'm sure I'm not the only one guilty of throwing money at toyz. :wink:

As a cyclist, I'm well kitted out with tools that don't get a lot of regular use but are a godsend when you need them; wheel truing stand, 1 - 20Nm torque wrench, specialist bearing presses, chain wear gauges, you name it. Agree there's no point buying things that'll just collect dust but I'm not totally adverse to spending pennies on stuff that will last and give me the impetus to try new things.

As a slight aside, I suspect many on here would be horrified over the pricing of bike equipment. Don't get me wrong, these wheels are bludy expensive but just about everybody I know has a disc wheel for racing.
 

Dibs-h

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If it don't save time, money or make me money - I'm (almost always) not interested TBH.

Impetus - something black and green isn't going to give you that, nor does it come with with a power lead.

A Mathieson plane on the other hand would certainly give impetus in learning new skill. Or a Sauer & Steiner if funds go that far! But there are cheaper options.

I'd be buying hand tools and giving the power tools a miss.

Different strokes, different folks I suppose.

Dibs
 

9fingers

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I can see that you are a near hopeless case.

Tools should be purchased on the basis of need or efficiency and do not compensate for low skill levels
Wean yourself off any more of the lime green stuff until you have worked out what you are going to make and hence which tools you need.

Bob
 

woodbloke

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9fingers":1m9h830r said:
I can see that you are a near hopeless case.

Tools should be purchased on the basis of need or efficiency and do not compensate for low skill levels
Wean yourself off any more of the lime green stuff until you have worked out what you are going to make and hence which tools you need.

Bob
Rubbish Bob...I'm just weaning myself onto the lime green and black stuff :mrgreen: :lol: :lol: - Rob
 

m1ke_a

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Dibs, 9 fingers, I think I've spent enough on Festoon for the time being though the vac has been great with clearing dust and rubble from some wall chasing. Ooops that's not wood working....

However I'll have to disagree about no impetus as I have in a round about way, rekindled a desire to develop my skills more. The mft has already helped in fitting new doors and I can't wait to finally get an insulated, lit and powered workshop.

As you know, having the right tools (powered or otherwise) makes a world of difference and whilst a fool and his money may be easily parted, it is my money and all that. :D

Cheers

Mike
 

Cheshirechappie

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Arguably, project number one in any new workshop should be the largest, most solidly built bench the shop can sensibly accommodate. With that in mind, maybe the next purchase should be a good vice. Or vices, face and tail.
 

woodbloke

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Cheshirechappie":3flu6g45 said:
Arguably, project number one in any new workshop should be the largest, most solidly built bench the shop can sensibly accommodate. With that in mind, maybe the next purchase should be a good vice. Or vices, face and tail.
+1 - Rob
 

m1ke_a

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Cheshirechappie":2jkvvnjr said:
Arguably, project number one in any new workshop should be the largest, most solidly built bench the shop can sensibly accommodate. With that in mind, maybe the next purchase should be a good vice. Or vices, face and tail.
The MFT will still need to be portable and is approx 1100mm. I reckon I can add another of 1m of fixed bench so that should cover most lengths.

I'll need to accommodate my mechanics vice which you wouldn't ordinarily want to put on top of a (wood) working bench. Have people fitted them flush and parallel with say a face vice?
 

marcros

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I would be tempted to make the mechanics vice removable. It neednt be a big task to put it on the bench when needed, but I think that you will find it gets in the way otherwise.
 

m1ke_a

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Tis only a baby 1 ton vice but does get used quite a bit so I'd rather keep it fixed down. I guess there's no reason why it can't be put on a shelf on the side of the bench.
 

Tony Spear

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m1ke_a":1j9nndox said:
New workshop is on order and I'll finally have a decent sized space to work fully under cover.

what would make sense as a semi permanent tool?

I'm most likely to focus on DIY type work, including kitchen cabinets, fitted wardrobes and so on.

I'm thinking router table / cabinet or a table or band saw.

Any suggestions?
From your description of what you're intending to make I would say table saw over bandsaw, followed by a decent Router Table (loads of info on here about how to make one).

After that, a decent dust extraction unit (vital when working with MDF), loads of cramps/clamps, shooting board and a decent plane to go with it!
 

Cheshirechappie

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On the vice question, in an ideal world you'd have different benches for wood and metalwork, kitted with the appropriate vices.

However, in the real world with it's constraints of available space, time and beer tokens, another possibility is just one bench, built for woodworking. On the top, lay a sheet of ply or hardboard (shiny side up), cut to the same size as the benchtop. Place the metalwork vice on top of this, and bolt through both ply and benchtop. The ply thus takes all the metal filings, oilstains, spilled paint, ferret droppings and other undesirables that tend to accumulate on benches. When you need to do some 'clean' woodworking, unbolt said vice, stow on shelf, and lift off ply. The holes through the benchtop are very unlikely to be any bother. Once 'clean' jobs are done, re-instate ply and metalwork vice.

Bit of a pain having to unbolt, but it means the metalwork vice is available at short notice, and the 'general' bench surface can be replaced easily if necessary.
 

woodbloke

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The other way to do this is to get hold of a lump of 18mm ply around say 600x600mm or a suitable size for your bench. Then cover this with a bit of galvanised steel, screwed into the ply in appropriate places, bolt your vice to the ply/galsteel from the underside (using coach bolts) in a position close to the front, so it's easy to use. Then, and hears the clever bit :wink: screw a piece of wood to the underside as well at the front, so that it'll clamp into your woodwork vice ...sort of like a bench hook.
You now have a completely separate metalwork station, with it's vice, that can be dropped on top of the wood bench and held securely in the woodwork vice, so that when you're done with the ferret droppings :lol: , unscrew the woodvice, lift off the metalwork table, lob it into a corner and get on with some woodwork - Rob
 

dickm

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woodbloke":ju34fwil said:
lob it into a corner and get on with some woodwork - Rob
If you try and lob a metalwork vice anywhwere, even on its own, let alone with all that metal attached, you won't be doing any woodwork for a while :( DAMHIKT
Unless you have a d**n good chiropracter!
 

m1ke_a

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woodbloke":181lqw8d said:
Then, and hears the clever bit :wink: screw a piece of wood to the underside as well at the front, so that it'll clamp into your woodwork vice ...sort of like a bench hook.
- Rob
That's brilliant and yet so glaringly obvious at the same time. God bless t'interweb and all that sail in her. 8)

Now, anyone fancy coming up with a solution for a bench mount bike repair stand - http://www.parktool.com/category/bench- ... unt-stands ? :wink:
 
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