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What oil/wax/varnish/stain to use when turning?

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=Adam=

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Hi guys!

I am a newcomer to the wood turning game and would like some advice on what to use to finish the project off. I haven't started anything yet, I just want to get an idea of what to use so I can buy some :)

I have been watching YouTube videos and there is one guy who applies a wax/stain to the sandpaper and the sands and coats at the same time, is this a good technique or is it used to save time?

The person I bought the lathe off recommended chestnut brand which I have heard of before. Would this be my best option or are there cheaper/better alternatives out there?

When cleaning out the work area yesterday I came across a few tins of bee's wax (for wood application) and these seem fairly good, are these recommended?

Thanks for looking and sorry for all of the questions!


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Katchin

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Best advice really is experiment, you'll want to try many finishes, and will use various finishes depending upon what you are making.

I use sanding sealer and microcrystaline wax a lot, because is easy, quick, and very effective. On pens I use a mixture of Boiled Linseed Oil and superglu. Other items look better with different finishes, but experimentation is the best method.

The Chestnut brand is very good, but i'm sure others are equally good.
 

CHJ

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Cellulose sanding sealer and chestnut woodwax22 is about the easiest route.
Fine for anything that does not have to be handled a great deal and not subject to water splashes. WW22 is a soft blended wax based on Beeswax so is melted by hand temperatures.

Sanding sealer and Microcrystalline wax for anything subject to a lot of handling or the occasional water splashes, the wax has a higher melting point and needs a little more friction heat generated than beeswax when polishing off to get best effect.

Those are the two simplest methods in my opinion, (or the equivalent from other brands) once mastered and built up turning experience then you can try friction polishes and oils etc. if you desire to try other matt or semi gloss finishes.

The main criteria with finishing is to prepare the wood surface to the point that there are no tool marks or abrasive scratches visible before attempting to apply a finish. When you have achieved this status then is the time to apply the sanding sealer, (or oil) don't be surprised at this stage if scratches suddenly show up, that's the nature of the woods reaction to being wetted, just go back through the sanding grits to remove them, this is often best done with the lathe stationary and remember, Sand with the grain whenever possible, any scratches run with the grain and are less visible.
 

RogerS

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Any suggestions for a finish that does not impart it's own colour to the wood...ie stop your beautiful pale ash going orange/yellow/brown ?
 
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