Quantcast

What cramps does the home workshop need?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Cheshirechappie

Established Member
Joined
30 Jan 2012
Messages
4,730
Reaction score
13
Location
Cheshire
All the textbooks say, "you can never have too many cramps". For a communal workshop, with commercial pressures on time, I can see the sens in this.

However, for us amateurs pottering away in the garage, what cramps do we actually need?

My arsenal, accumulated over about twenty years, consists of 48", 30" and 18" sash cramps, 4 off each, 6" and 12" F-cramps, 4 off each, and a motley collection of mostly smaller G-cramps. The 6" F-cramps get the most use by far.

My work so far has been a bench (which taught me how not to design and build a bench), a toolchest (great fun - 30" long dovetail joints!), various cupboards and boxes. Now it's time to think about some decent furniture for the house - wardrobes, chests of drawers, writing tables and the like, from hardwoods. So carcase work, frame-and panel doors, proper drawers and the like.

What should I add to the cramping equipment, or can I get by with what I have?
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
That's about what I've got...I maybe have a few more, but it's about that. I found a selection of cheapie spring clamps very useful...four of each, small and large - Rob
 

Paul Chapman

Established Member
Joined
26 Jan 2006
Messages
8,657
Reaction score
0
Location
Bookham, Surrey
Cheshirechappie":zv0l21yn said:
What should I add to the cramping equipment, or can I get by with what I have?
I would say you have it about right for hobby use. It you need any more, it will become self-evident. If your sash cramps are the Record style, two can always be bolted together if you need any really long sash cramps.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,289
Reaction score
36
Location
In the eternally wet North
Rule One - you never have a clamp of the right size

Rule Two - if you have a clamp of the right size, your project requires two or three or even more

Rule Three - the nut holding the wee bar that turns the clamp will always fall off and you will lose the wee bar. Said loss not coming to light until you are well into the glue-up and simply MUST have that extra clamp

Rule Four - you only discover after applying at least six clamps that they are actually the wrong way round and that you cannot get the winding sticks anywhere sensible.
 

Rob Platt

Established Member
Joined
21 Nov 2010
Messages
583
Reaction score
0
Location
Merseyside
1 one more than you`ve got generally speaking.
2 depends on what you`re going to build
3 need and want are not the same thing
4 sit down and plan what you`re going to build next and work it out
all the best
rob
 

Cheshirechappie

Established Member
Joined
30 Jan 2012
Messages
4,730
Reaction score
13
Location
Cheshire
Thank you, gentlemen.

woodbloke - I was thinking about making some Bob Wearing drawer slip cramps, but following your tip I see that APTC do 2" capacity spring clamps at about £1-50 each. Couldn't buy the materials for the Bob Wearing ones for that! Thanks!

Paul C - I was mulling the possibility of a set of four extension bars for the sash cramps to cover long jobs; it hadn't occurred to me to bolt 'em end-to-end. That saves me the thick end of a hundred quid! Thanks!

artful - not sure I'm ready for Zen and the art of Wood Squeezing. The question was "what do I need", and the answer has come forth!

RogerS and Rob - do I detect the resigned tone of bitter experience? But the point about planning ahead is a good one, Rob - thanks!

While I was in the early stages, and possessing not a single sash cramp, I bodged a method of edge-jointing boards by using two pieces of 3"x3/4" about a foot longer than the job, with a 1" hole about 3" from each end. One of these went above the job, and one below, then two short pieces of 1" dowel went through the holes to connect them. A piece of packing between the lower dowel and job, and a pair if folding wedges between the upper dowel and job finished it, and applied the pressure. Worked fine, except that the dowels kept dropping out at inopportune moments. For extra pressure, use slower-sloped wedges and bits of parallel packing. Doesn't work for a carcase, though - sash cramps are more versatile!

You can wangle all sorts of dodges for the cost of some cheap softwood and a bit of time.
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
Steve Maskery":qx1z98sd said:
I always found that Luthier clamps were as good as anything for lightweight assemblies. Easy to make and cheap as chips:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjKglYx2XTE

S
Agreed, they're very good and I made one using Steve's method, but as I'm a bit of clampklutz it took me about three goes to get it right...got there in the end:



...though and they do work well. This one in maple with ebony dowels, but any decent hardwood will do - Rob
 
Top