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TS2500ci Status Report

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Martin

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...Well it arrived, and it's bl**dy big and bl**dy heavy! The truck driver and I struggled to get it into the workshop (in fact the main unit had to be taken out of its packaging because it wouldn't go through the front door otherwise (only means of access to workshop). Even then it was tight.

Actually the truck driver was really good - he could have been mean and just left the pallet at my front door, but he helped none the less (despite the weight). I tipped him a fiver in the end, which I felt was the least I could do given how helpful he'd been.

As noted in other reports on the 2500CI, the manual is really just the old manual (from the non-CI version ) with a different front cover. This makes it a challenge, since there are a number of new design features which makes the instructions next to useless. However, if you were good at mechano in your youth then you shouldn't have a problem. Really just a case of trial and error. The main differences (so far) are the fixings to the CI table (not surprising) - particulary the NVR switch - and an extra panel round the back for the dust extraction port.

The saw comes mostly assembled, with the main unit, motor, blade, CI table all assembled. For the most part it's just a case of putting the feet, panels and other "external" bits on like the fence.

Currently I'm about 3 hours into the assembly, which has speeded up considerably once I worked out which bits went where - there were a few U-turns on the way. Very impressed with the build quality. Everything oozes durability and quality - even the side extension table, which I feared might be on the flimsy side, but it is surprisingly heavy/stable given that it's not CI.

Having got this far I've now realised that my little Perform vacuum/extractor just isn't going to cut it here - the design of the dust extraction (which has a 100mil flexible hose running internally from the saw blade assembly to the outlet in the casing) really needs something better sucking away at it - so the HA2600 extractor just got added to the list of new toys :evil: (don't tell SWMBO)..

Anyway, that's just a brief (?) status report - I'll post a full review + pictures once I've got it all sorted out.

Incidentally, I noticed today that NMA are advertising the slot cutter (dado head) attachment which fits on this new version for £99 - I called D&M tools and they obliged by sorting it out the same day - so they're still available (I had thought they'd gone up in price again). This is a real bargain - list price for the these cutters is around £260. Yet another purchase that can be blamed fairly and squarely on his Normness.

Martin.
 
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Anonymous

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Hope you get good use from it my non ci version has served me well, now enough waffle get starting on a project to break it in ohh and dont forget some nice pictures please :lol:
 

Martin

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tx2man":j5m2n4h0 said:
congrats Martin, :mrgreen:

from he who has nuurrthing :cry:

TX
Thanks TX - I also started with nought, and after 10yrs or so am still collecting the bits for my dream workshop (I should have bought quality from the start, but there you go...)

anobium - will post some piccies and more details once I've finished assembling (didn't manage it last night). There's certainly a project waiting in the wings - I have some nice White Oak in stick, sitting ready to become a coffee table (part of the reason for the upgrade - the thought of cutting expensive hardwood on my old TS doesn't bear thinking about...).
 

Digizz

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Told you it was heavy ;)

I'm disapointed the instructions still haven't been sorted, makes putting it together rather more difficult (although the challenge is fun!).

Didn't help that the bags of bits were all labelled in German and didn't really seem to be grouped logically!

Must investigate the Dado head - sounds interesting.
 
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It doesn't seem long ago that the mere mention of the word "Dado"would bring down the wrath of the forum on your head. Guess it's becoming more acceptable to use one now.Many forum members claim it is easier to make a trench (housing/dado) with a router but having tried both the dado set is much simpler for me, quicker to set up and no wander or clamp slide.
 

Digizz

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I've got a woodrat - what could I do with a dado cutter that the woodrat can't? i.e. do I need one ;)
 

Midnight

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I've got a woodrat - what could I do with a dado cutter that the woodrat can't? i.e. do I need one
speaking as someone with neither pest cntrol nor dado cutter probs, I'd say the short answer is... make trench cuts without burning out straight cutters every hour... routers may be cheaper but trench cuts will eat your straight bits at an alarming rate.... simply because it's able to throw more carbide at the task, a dado head will stay sharper...longer... provided you treat the sucker with the utmost respect....
 

Martin

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Thanks all for your kind words - still setting the beast up - but I did manage to get the wiring complete last night (n.b. it comes with a special plug that slots into the NVR switch, but you have to wire up your own lead from that to a domestic plug). Switched it on and it's amazingly quiet compared to my previous TS. Still haven't cut anything with it yet - waiting for the DE before I start using in anger...

I've also still got to set-up the sliding table. The set-up is taking longer than I imagined, although the instructions are often less than clear.

The other set-back was that I managed to set up the guide rail and fence, calibrated it all nicely, and then moved on to fit the side extension table only to find that this involved removing the guide rail support (that I'd just calibrated) on the RHS :evil:. So if you buy this as part of the kit with the side table, just bear this in mind when assembling and you'll save yourself some time...

Digizz":h6520kcx said:
Told you it was heavy ;)
You can say that again. I've now mounted it on one those HTC mobile bases - so moving it is a breeze. It now sits in a gap next to the wall, alongside my workbench. When I need to use it I just flip the mobile wheels and pull it out a couple of foot. Works very well. Very much recommend the HTC bases (£50 from D&M)...

Digizz":h6520kcx said:
Didn't help that the bags of bits were all labelled in German and didn't really seem to be grouped logically!
From the look of it, what they've done is to use old stock of "bags of bits" from the previous version of the saw, and just added the new components into other bags. As you say, it does make it very confusing at times because the parts you need are often split over multiple bags. It also means that you have bits left over (that were needed in the old version presumably) that don't seem to fit anywhere...

Digizz":h6520kcx said:
Must investigate the Dado head - sounds interesting.
Still waiting for it. I'll let you know what I think when it arrives. One slight downside is that it's HSS only I think...

jaymar":h6520kcx said:
Guess it's becoming more acceptable to use one now.Many forum members claim it is easier to make a trench (housing/dado) with a router but having tried both the dado set is much simpler for me, quicker to set up and no wander or clamp slide.
I've tried doing this with a router before, but I agree with you - I just can't imagine it being any easier than using a Dado (although I don't have a Woodrat admittedly). Time will tell - this project in Oak has a few dado jobs in it....
 

Alf

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jaymar":3lhm9hn1 said:
It doesn't seem long ago that the mere mention of the word "Dado"would bring down the wrath of the forum on your head. Guess it's becoming more acceptable to use one now.
Nah, don't think so. It's just too boring repeating the same old arguments that's all.

Cheers, Alf
 

Rattie

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Martin":1dd61hi9 said:
(n.b. it comes with a special plug that slots into the NVR switch, but you have to wire up your own lead from that to a domestic plug)
And if it's anything like the HMS260ci P/T, then the induction motor will occasionally burn through your domestic 13A fuses in said plug on start up, forcing you to lay in pukka 16A sockets for the beasts.

Bought it all, just waiting until I get a free day to add in the 16A MCB to the Consumer Unit.

Martyn
 

Martin

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Rattie,

Yep - I've been slightly worried about that, despite the adverts stating 13A supply required. My brother used to be a sparkie, and he's down to visit us this weekend so I think I'll pick his brains on that one.

Last thing I want is to re-wire the entire workshop - but presumably it's just a case of putting in a 16A MCB and a 16A fuse in the plug to the TS (forgive my ignorance of all things electrical!). That is, I assume the cabling to the sockets is rated much higher (30A?), and that the sockets themselves are rated above 13A?

Martin.
 

Digizz

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You also need to put in 16A socket(s) - the blue round ones and make sure the supply to the workshop is beefy enough (although in reality it's not going to make much difference unless you start running loads more kit).

In my recently completed workshop, I ran a 10mm armoured cable from the house consumer unit (from the non-RCD side) via a 45A MCB. The workshop had it's own consumer unit and was grounded locally as I also fitted an RCD there (so I didn't have to go back to the house if it trips). I had two lighting circuits on the non-RCD side for strip lights (high freq daylight) and outside light (two circuits as they are both X10 computer controlled like the rest of the house - that's a different story!). I also had a 13A ring main protected by a 32A MCB (on the RCD side) and 5 16A MCB's (B Type for motors) 'star' wired to 16A sockets using 2.5mm cable.

I'm not suggesting you do anything like this but I thought it might help a little?
 

gidon

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I have the same planer but without the cast iron top. I run it off a 13A fuse. It does blow the circuit if I run another high power machine like my table saw, but as long as I avoid this I don't have a problem.

But handy you have an electrician coming round to check things out.

Cheers

Gidon
 

Martin

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Thanks guys. I hope I'll be OK - doubt I'd want to run anything as powerful as the TS at the same time - more likely the TS + extractor together, which should draw 11 + 2.5 amps respectively (13.5A total).

Hopefully that'll not give me problems - but I'll ask my brother to take a look anyway...

Martin
 

Rattie

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I hope you have better luck than me. My P/T will burn a 13A fuse if my Trend T30 vac is also running. If it's not, I'll usually get away with it.

The problem is the induction motor, hell of a surge current on startup. That just knocks it over the edge for a split second. Hence the need for 16A. YMMV, but I'd get your brother in straight off to sort it out. Free sparkies, excellent :wink:

Cheers

Martyn
 

Martin

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Rattie,

I spoke to my brother about this and he reckons that the initial surges on these machines will over time cause a fuse to weaken, so he wasn't surprised to hear that they blow occasionally. He also said that fuses are designed to cope with short surges above their rating - since the surges themselves are usually very short.

Given that I'll be running the extractor + TS off of separate sockets, I don't see how running them together can cause one to blow (at the plug). Also, the fuses in the fuse box will be rated far higher, so again, I don't see a problem so long as I don't try plugging multiple machines into a single socket through a 4-gang or something..

Martin.
 
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