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D_W

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I'm figuring he may have seen my videos - but if he hasn't, no big deal. I'll direct him then. If he follows your advice, he'll need a giant tub of wood filler, but he's welcome to do that if that's how he'd like to go (I doubt that's the case).
 

Jacob

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I'm figuring he may have seen my videos - but if he hasn't, no big deal. I'll direct him then. If he follows your advice, he'll need a giant tub of wood filler, but he's welcome to do that if that's how he'd like to go (I doubt that's the case).
I'd like to see them too.
Don't get carried away - woodfiller (putty) is useful on painted work, cheap materials, unskilled simple joinery, as in your example.
PS OK I've spotted one! This is you isn't it?



3 or 4 minutes useful and half an hour of meandering waffle - sounds about right?
You've said it all by about 6 minutes in and what you are describing is just fairly normal freehand sharpening!
Well done!
There are variations of course but essentially very similar to Paul Sellers - except he goes for expensive diamond plates and the convex bevel.
Myself ditto except I go from medium Norton to fine Norton for most purposes, but one or two more steps for extra special sharpening to a fine arkansas and/or strop on leather.
Personally I would hold a long chisel like that by the end of the handle and other hand somewhere near the middle, to get more pressure (faster), to maintain the 30º in a controlled way (and lower as you dip) and to keep my fingers out of the oil.
Holding the chisel so near the pointy end looks like someone still recovering from honing jig addiction. 😁
PS I wouldn't put a fine chisel like that parer near a powered grindstone - it's unnecessary if you sharpen a little and often, but more importantly - for novices grinding can cause problems , not only the messy effect but also the over heating and blued edges.
 
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Sgian Dubh

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Are you going to tell Ozi how to sharpen then, or just waffle on meaninglessly? :rolleyes: We are all agog! :ROFLMAO:
I usually find these p*ssing exchanges between yourself and David somewhat amusing, and sometimes informative, but now it's all just getting tedious. Slainte.
 

Jacob

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I usually find these p*ssing exchanges between yourself and David somewhat amusing, and sometimes informative, but now it's all just getting tedious. Slainte.
Don't read them then, you are under no obligation.
These things come round continuously the conversation will never stop as new people enter and others leave the room.
 

Sgian Dubh

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Don't read them then, you are under no obligation.
These things come round continuously the conversation will never stop as new people enter and others leave the room.
Of course I'm under no obligation to read, but if I don't check the threads out from time to time, I'd miss the amusing and informative bits. It doesn't eliminate the tedious business of having to sift through the cr*pola to find the useful nuggets. Slainte.
 

D_W

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I'd like to see them too.
Don't get carried away - woodfiller (putty) is useful on painted work, cheap materials, unskilled simple joinery, as in your example.
PS OK I've spotted one! This is you isn't it?



3 or 4 minutes useful and half an hour of meandering waffle - sounds about right?
You've said it all by about 6 minutes in and what you are describing is just fairly normal freehand sharpening!
Well done!
There are variations of course but essentially very similar to Paul Sellers - except he goes for expensive diamond plates and the convex bevel.
Myself ditto except I go from medium Norton to fine Norton for most purposes, but one or two more steps for extra special sharpening to a fine arkansas and/or strop on leather.
Personally I would hold a long chisel like that by the end of the handle and other hand somewhere near the middle, to get more pressure (faster), to maintain the 30º in a controlled way (and lower as you dip) and to keep my fingers out of the oil.
Holding the chisel so near the pointy end looks like someone still recovering from honing jig addiction. 😁
PS I wouldn't put a fine chisel like that parer near a powered grindstone - it's unnecessary if you sharpen a little and often, but more importantly - for novices grinding can cause problems , not only the messy effect but also the over heating and blued edges.


That method is fine, but it was done by request for someone who sent me an email and said "please do a video of sharpening a tool with two oilstones instead of just a washita".

The second stone is expensive, the principles are still the same, but my method is completed more successfully than yours, and 30 degrees would be demolished by the pine that I showed planing above.

It only matters if you want to do it well.

Grinding isn't difficult - it's only described as difficult by people like you who have a strong sense of failure and don't figure it out. I mentioned before and it remains true, most people who send me planes or give me planes to look at with issues and who have tried your so called rounded bevel method grind a lack of clearance by hand over time and the issues with plane performance are clearance based.

Only raffo on here has given me a plane with a rounded bevel where he actually worked all the way to the edge -the others were clearance combined with an unfinished edge.

you do this less well than I do, and while I meander, I can explain and prove why something doesn't work well and something else does. You can run a shaper making window parts and post on a hand tool forum.

I posted this set of chisels yesterday in the build thread in the upper forum. They are ground after the chisels are hardened. None of them got hot enough that I couldn't hold them and they don't get dipped while grinding the bevels. They are as manufactured, only struck so far to set the handles. Eventually, the bevels will get neater - not for show, but to do the business at the end as well as possible.
20210425_192901.jpg

You are all talk - I've never seen any proof from you of anything other than sanded stair parts and some used test wood - and a plane sole that was unevenly finished. There's little I'd take a suggestion from you on because I don't think you have the nerve endings to know what's good and what's not.
 
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D_W

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.. like that by the end of the handle and other hand somewhere near the middle, to get more pressure (faster), to maintain the 30º in a controlled way (and lower as you dip) and to keep my fingers out of the oil.

I'm sure your chisels show the result of grasping up away from the end with one hand - in uneven bevels. I'm sure you have no idea why one of my hands is steering and applying pressure near the bevel end at the same time. I like the attempt at a slight about a construction lumber simple bed that I made - for being simple after I described why it's simple. I've met real makers, real doers - and talk to one on a regular basis. you're a cog in the wheel of the lower tier at best - a barn builder, and you call yourself a professional.

I'm just an amateur, and comfortable with it. I'm not looking for people who know too much to learn from people better than them or who work to low standards as you show - I learn from people like George Wilson who set standards and meet them. George would have no clue who you are - but there are a couple of people he's met who bother me about posting things like making chisels who say "ask George who I am". I have no idea what they expect, and I don't prime him about the situation, but he identifies them and says "he's a terrible craftsman". I'll pretend he knows you.
 

D_W

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Both you and Jacob post useful 'nuggets'. Sorry to accuse you both of usefulness. Slainte.

Seems a high bar to have to hurdle - such an obligation it is!! Of course, I don't trouble you much because you're full of....

..wait for it...

legitimacy and credible proof. It pours out of your work history. When you tell me yay or nay on hand tools, it's colored by need. When you mention issues with silica and lines on mahogany (which I've inadvertently solved), it's credibility - you can tell me exactly why it doesn't matter to you - because your customers don't care in most cases and want an even surface, so those bits are sanded out. That's reality, I appreciate it.
 

Jacob

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Both you and Jacob post useful 'nuggets'. Sorry to accuse you both of usefulness. Slainte.
Well thanks for that Richard!
Can't say I entirely agree about you know who !
He's gone into trying to be even more offensive so I've put him on ignore for the final time.
Perhaps someone will let me know if he ever says anything interesting, which looks increasingly unlikely. He's said his all, at great length! :LOL:
 
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Sgian Dubh

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Perhaps someone will let me know if he ever says anything interesting, which looks increasingly unlikely. He's said his all, at great length! :LOL:
Both of you say interesting things. But I do wish you'd both stop butting heads. Each of you come from very different experience and backgrounds. My background and experience is different again, and whilst I can be strongly fixed in my point of view or position, I've usually found that analysing the perspective and experience of someone else worthwhile because it might be useful to me.

By the way, you too are pretty resolute in saying your all at great length. I've never seen any reason to put someone on ignore in this forum. If I'm aware that a poster here is an incorrigible plonker, I can always just zoom through any contribution he/she makes. Publicly declaring you're ignoring someone does seem to me to a bit petty and huffy. What's the point, I don't get it. Slainte.
 
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Jacob

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Both of you say interesting things. But I do wish you'd both stop butting heads. Each of you come from very different experience and backgrounds. My background and experience is different again, and whilst I can be strongly fixed in my point of view or position, I've usually found that analysing the perspective and experience of someone else worthwhile because it might be useful to me.

By the way, you too are pretty resolute in saying your all at great length. I've never seen any reason to put someone on ignore in this forum. If I'm aware that a poster here is an incorrigible plonker, I can always just zoom through any contribution he/she makes. Publicly declaring you're ignoring someone does seem to me to a bit petty and huffy. What's the point, I don't get it. Slainte.
I get cascades of abuse and I assume nobody is particularly interested in reading my return comments. I've conceded victory on the insult front!
 

D_W

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I've never seen any reason to put someone on ignore in this forum. If I'm aware that a poster here is an incorrigible plonker..

It's an excellent way to keep from having the red bell show that you've got new posts to read only to find out that they're all from one person following you around, but to me, it's never needed more than temporarily for that. Silent application is advisable if the point is to avoid conflict.
 

Inspector

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Question when you put someone on Ignore you don't see any of their posts. Do they still see yours? Apologies for straying even further from the topic.

Pete
 

D_W

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Question when you put someone on Ignore you don't see any of their posts. Do they still see yours? Apologies for straying even further from the topic.

Pete
Yes, they still see yours, but you don't see theirs or get notification that they're quoting you.
 

Sgian Dubh

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It's an excellent way to keep from having the red bell show that you've got new posts to read ...
Red bells? Interesting, because I've never seen such a thing when visiting this forum. I suspect that's because of my user settings in which I specified that I didn't want notifications of responses to messages I've posted. I can't see the need to be notified about such things because I know where I've posted, and therefore generally know which threads to keep a bit of an eye on to see how things develop. I suspect it helps that I'm not an especially prolific poster (I can go days, even weeks making no contribution) so I don't have that many threads to monitor.

Still, any contributor that I think turns out to be copper bottomed b*llend isn't, to me, worth putting on ignore - if necessary, I just scroll quickly past any post they make. Slainte.
 

D_W

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That's just unfair to builders of barns everywhere.

I respect a good barn builder who says they're one, that's for sure! Why? Other than for no reason not to, my parents sold their farm only this last year (though it had gone to rent decades ago). I spent my share of time as a kid putting hay bales in a barn that was well over 3 digit temperatures. Funny (unrelated), I saw a this-old-house time lapse last night where they were making a hip roof barn and it was made entirely of glue lam and plywood. I didn't even know you could do that and call it a barn (they're all timberframe where I'm from - some of them are shot from the civil war cavalry battles being close by - one with a droop in the center from being shot in the beam under the roof by a cannon - it's been like that since 1863 and still standing - just droops a little in the middle).
 

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