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twothumbs

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I am hoping someone can give me some help. I want to make small boxes for the tooth fairy or something similar for my new granddaughters as keep sakes. One is in America and I want to use old apple wood from the family garden to make it worth keeping in the future......a link to the old home and all that, although it could be any wood. I have yet to cut up the apple wood into small (say 10mm thick) but the wood will be hard now and possibly split so am happy enough to use the wood turners trick of epoxy filled splits, possibly colour as in gold or silver. Some looks as if it may be burred (?). Really something which will be liked when received and appreciated long after I am long gone as I may never meet the ‘wee one’ in America. The wood is several years drying out as logs so should be dry. An indication of where I could look for ideas would be appreciated as I have no ideas myself. Best wishes to you all.
 

doorframe

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And best wishes to you too, twothumbs.

A really nice project for you. For ideas, have you had a look in the Box Challenge WIP's in the projects section?
 

AndyT

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How about this style of box?



This one is about three inches long. You can make them from any scrap of wood - your old apple would be ideal.
According to Roy Underhill it's a traditional grease box, to hold tallow to lubricate the sole of your plane - but it would be ideal for a tooth or two.

The lid slides and swivels so that the dovetail part locks it, which is very satisfying. I really enjoyed making this one which I use to keep small drill bits in.

The video on how to make them is here:

http://video.pbs.org/video/1425807116
 

barkwindjammer

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AndyT":35dppk60 said:
How about this style of box?



This one is about three inches long. You can make them from any scrap of wood - your old apple would be ideal.
According to Roy Underhill it's a traditional grease box, to hold tallow to lubricate the sole of your plane - but it would be ideal for a tooth or two.

The lid slides and swivels so that the dovetail part locks it, which is very satisfying. I really enjoyed making this one which I use to keep small drill bits in.

The video on how to make them is here:

http://video.pbs.org/video/1425807116
What a brilliant little box Andy :) ,
And great idea Twothumbs-good luck with the Apple wood
 

twothumbs

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Thank you guys. The box looks great and would make a very suitable present. I will make a start on cutting my Apple and Plum branches and trunks and see how it they shape up. The American video looks very useful so good too. Had a quick look at the Box Challenge and will work through them at length as there is some fine work and interpretation of ideas. Thanks for your kind help. Will let you know how it goes when I get down to it. Suspect I willl do a dumm- run in Redwood first. Thanks again.
 

custard

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Two Thumbs, what a lovely project and I wish you every success!

I'd just say that there's usually a massive difference between trunk wood and branch wood. Branch wood is full of tensions (a bit like the wood from trees that have grown on sloping ground), and in my experience they hardly ever yield satisfactory timber as it just seems to keep on warping. I'd be tempted to concentrate on the trunk wood and save the branches for the wood burning stove.
 

Steve Maskery

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Can someone explain to a thicky like me why the top appears to be in two layers? Whet does the upper top do that the lower top doesn't?
S
 

John Brown

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I think the top layer has a round hole at the pivot point, whereas the lid below has a slot, so swinging the top layer out of the way allows you to slide the lid out of engagement with the butterfly dovetail (or whatever it is). So the top layer is, in effect , a locking device.

Just guessing...
 

AndyT

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John Brown got it right. The locking mechanism is simple but pleasantly effective.

Here are some more pics to make it clear for anyone without access to video:







But this is not the only possibility - what about a turned box or a bandsawn box? Someone else must have some suitable examples!
 

bugbear

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Pete Maddex":1vuiitlv said:
Hi, Steve

Should have watched the video :roll: :D

Pete

Yeah - Andy described it, albeit in a very concise manner, and linked to a video. I don't quite understand the questions.

BugBear
 

Steve Maskery

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Indeed I should. BUt my internet connection is sloooooow and video gets streamed in 10 second bursts, so it isn't worth the aggro. BBC iPlayer isn't so bad as I can download and then watch.
But I get it now. Looks a nice little project.
S
 

Harbo

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Yes endless possibilities with that mechanism? Mutton Tallow I think not?

You have my sincere sympathises Steve - until our village received BT Infinity a couple of years ago I could never download any videos - even now I keep forgetting I can?!

Rod
 

Dangermouse

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Be aware the USA has lots of laws about what you cant import and if my memory serves me right, some types of wood are on that list. So best check out first.
 

bugbear

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Dangermouse":3s8fig1r said:
Be aware the USA has lots of laws about what you cant import and if my memory serves me right, some types of wood are on that list. So best check out first.
Looks like you're OK,other than CITES, which (should) apply worldwide

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail ... ted-states

http://www.iwpawood.org/displaycommon.c ... Z9mfJXniBs

Oh - here's the doc you want:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export ... /cites.pdf

Page 26 has "the lists"

BugBear
 

twothumbs

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Thank you for the USA wood matters. It never crossed my mind although I knew I would probaly have to describe for customs what was in the parcel. I can now write a 'Malus domestica' tooth fairy box and potential family heirloom! Sounds OK to me. Value = priceless.

Thanks again.
 

JakeS

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twothumbs":2r3pvsck said:
Value = priceless.
For what it's worth, in case you're unaware - the price cited on the package is used to determine the amount of any applicable import duties. I don't know what the duties are like in the US, but in this country it's something like 20% VAT on anything over £15 and 6.5% import duty on anything over (IIRC) around £100. Plus an arbitrary handling fee from your courier/postal service! It's obviously a legal requirement to be accurate with the value representation, but it's definitely worth not inflating your estimate!
 

bugbear

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JakeS":2kx2uvad said:
twothumbs":2kx2uvad said:
Value = priceless.
For what it's worth, in case you're unaware - the price cited on the package is used to determine the amount of any applicable import duties. I don't know what the duties are like in the US, but in this country it's something like 20% VAT on anything over £15 and 6.5% import duty on anything over (IIRC) around £100. Plus an arbitrary handling fee from your courier/postal service! It's obviously a legal requirement to be accurate with the value representation, but it's definitely worth not inflating your estimate!
Given the low prices for "craft items" (see other threads), I suspect £10 (or even £5) is defensible.

BugBear
 

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