The Face Mask Store?

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Chris152

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Has anyone used them and have any thoughts? I'm looking at a (brand) new welding mask that's a good price, but comes with no manufacturer's warranty when most suppliers include the warranty, and I wonder why.
Thanks, Chris.
 
I bought some disposable masks from them last year, and they were very good. There was some slight issue, they sent the wrong ones or something, can't really remember, but their customer service was excellent. Very fast communication and no quibbling. I'd recommend the company based on my experience.
 
Thanks.
Any thoughts why a retailer might have a new welding mask but not be able to offer the maker's warranty? Refurb or something?
 
Thanks.
Any thoughts why a retailer might have a new welding mask but not be able to offer the maker's warranty? Refurb or something?
I'd give them a call to discuss the question. It does seem quite odd. Hopefully they'll have a decent explanation but if not you'll know not to buy it.
 
I don't really understand how a product can be sold with no warranty.
Are you sure they're legit ?
They score 89% five stars from 738 reviews on Trustpilot so I guess that's mostly legit. Hard to know these days!
 
If you look at the contact details on the website they give the company as
A Lucre Musket Ltd.
It's registered at companies house, a bit recent, only 3 years old or so, but they have about £1/2 million on the balance sheet and look to paying down a loan that accounts for a sizeable chunk of this at a rate of £100k a year.
The owners are Sam (Samuel Peter) Tucker and his wife. No one attempting to hide there.
Google "A Lucre Musket Ltd" and they have 170 odd listings on amazon including some top spec air fed welding masks.
It all looks pretty legit, just that an important part of their business is based on buying cartons of product, breaking them down and selling singles.
Lots of online sellers do the same with power tools, breaking down kits and selling the bits individually. It isn't the sort of business that a top end manufacturer is likely to be courting as an important route to market but if their money is good why wouldn't anyone supply them...
BUT if (say) a full air fed welding kit is given a single serial number by the manufacturer and then sold in pieces to multiple customers, those multiple buyers may not be able to register for the factory warranty with a shared serial number because that isn't how the manufacturer sold it.
You can find exactly the same problem if you buy a cordless tool battery of charger that came from a bundle. Try to register the charger say and you find 2 batteries added to your list at the same time. If the buyers of those batteries then try to register them, they'll be refused.
On expensive pro gear, 3 year warranties are expected and these will involve you registering with the manufacturer. That's where it will all fall down. I'd want discounts of 30% vs the authorised distributor pricing if I was going to lose an extended warranty so make sure you are getting a heavy discount.
 
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If you look at the contact details on the website they give the company as
A Lucre Musket Ltd.
It's registered at companies house, a bit recent, only 3 years old or so, but they have about £1/2 million on the balance sheet and look to paying down a loan that accounts for a sizeable chunk of this at a rate of £100k a year.
The owners are Sam (Samuel Peter) Tucker and his wife. No one attempting to hide there.
Google "A Lucre Musket Ltd" and they have 170 odd listings on amazon including some top spec air fed welding masks.
It all looks pretty legit, just that an important part of their business is based on buying cartons of product, breaking them down and selling singles.
Lots of online sellers do the same with power tools, breaking down kits and selling the bits individually. It isn't the sort of business that a top end manufacturer is likely to be courting as an important route to market but if their money is good why wouldn't anyone supply them...
BUT if (say) a full air fed welding kit is given a single serial number by the manufacturer and then sold in pieces to multiple customers, those multiple buyers may not be able to register for the factory warranty with a shared serial number because that isn't how the manufacturer sold it.
You can find exactly the same problem if you buy a cordless tool battery of charger that came from a bundle. Try to register the charger say and you find 2 batteries added to your list at the same time. If the buyers of those batteries then try to register them, they'll be refused.
Really helpful research there - thanks Sideways. The price they're asking for the kit isn't so far above a very clean/ little used kit on the bay, and standard consumer rights from a retailer necessarily apply, so I guess on that basis it's not a bad bet. Hmm...
 
If you look at the contact details on the website they give the company as
A Lucre Musket Ltd.
It's registered at companies house, a bit recent, only 3 years old or so, but they have about £1/2 million on the balance sheet and look to paying down a loan that accounts for a sizeable chunk of this at a rate of £100k a year.
The owners are Sam (Samuel Peter) Tucker and his wife. No one attempting to hide there.
Google "A Lucre Musket Ltd" and they have 170 odd listings on amazon including some top spec air fed welding masks.
It all looks pretty legit, just that an important part of their business is based on buying cartons of product, breaking them down and selling singles.
Lots of online sellers do the same with power tools, breaking down kits and selling the bits individually. It isn't the sort of business that a top end manufacturer is likely to be courting as an important route to market but if their money is good why wouldn't anyone supply them...
BUT if (say) a full air fed welding kit is given a single serial number by the manufacturer and then sold in pieces to multiple customers, those multiple buyers may not be able to register for the factory warranty with a shared serial number because that isn't how the manufacturer sold it.
You can find exactly the same problem if you buy a cordless tool battery of charger that came from a bundle. Try to register the charger say and you find 2 batteries added to your list at the same time. If the buyers of those batteries then try to register them, they'll be refused.
On expensive pro gear, 3 year warranties are expected and these will involve you registering with the manufacturer. That's where it will all fall down. I'd want discounts of 30% vs the authorised distributor pricing if I was going to lose an extended warranty so make sure you are getting a heavy discount.
Never even thought of this but it certainly seems feasible given the multiple deals offered online of makita , dewalt and Milwaukee etc . I watched a video a few months back on a guy who purchased 3 pallets of Milwaukee gear - there was supposed to be a percentage of power tools with minor damage , scuff marks and scratches etc but he got a couple of damaged drills and lots of empty cases loads of hole saws and these weird drain cleaner kits - I guess if your not concerned with warranty’s and registering your kit you can potentially get a good deal but personally I’d feel safer with a main dealer and full warranty . Excellent information though 👍👍
 
I picked up a big Fein 4 speed 18V drill a few years ago. It was part of a big bundle of new tools stolen and later recovered. The insurers had paid out for the loss so they auctioned off the recovered consignment to a chap who sold them individually on ebay.
All the serial number labels were removed by the insurer so it was impossible to register them for warranty. It looked a little suss so I was diligent about checking the story before handing over my ££ but the seller was totally genuine and excellent.
There's more money at risk but buying top brand kit, the quality control tends to be good so if it works when you receive it, it will probably stay that way.
 
I bought a new simple automatically darkening welding mask on eBay for about £20 (with warranty) about 5 years ago. It's worked flawlessly since. Has a grinding setting that prevents the darkening cutting in. They seem pretty cheap and ubiquitous these days.
 
u would be suprised how good the Lidil ones are.....for semi pro and DIY use perfect....
I have an expensive one £125 which isn't that expensive anymore.....
Having 2 welders in 2 diff places it's easier to have 2 lids.......
I cant find any difference between em.....
I prefer the self charging sort to the batt powered type......
my average amperage used is between 125 and 250......

they are in store next week here......yeah, yeah, it's all Greek to me as well........
IMG_9542.jpeg
 
OK, I've managed to get a draft, 12-month warranty from them, which is good.
But can anyone tell me the meaning of this - in particular, if it negates standard consumer rights?
"This warranty is given in lieu of all other warranties, expressed or implied, including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose"

Apparently it's a common one, but I've searched the net but it's all very legalese. Apart from consumer rights (which I assume can't be excluded?), the warranty states earlier:
'This warranty covers the repair or replacement of the product, at The Face Mask Store discretion, should it become defective during the warranty period.' (My emphasis)

It's not a house or car I'm buying, but for me it's a fair whack of money and I'd like to be clear what this means in practice.
Thanks for any thoughts.
 
Others will chime in but I think basic consumer rights include fit for purpose and definately of merchantable quality. So just ignore those exclusions.
For a period after purchase, you have the consumer right to demand a refund. Even on something like a brand new car. If it has a defect in the early days you don't have to let the seller fix it. Just demand a full cash refund. It gives you an almightly strong negotiating position.
After the item has been in use for a while, it migrates to a right to have a defective product repaired. It is common for the seller or manufacturer to want the right to replace a product at their discretion because they may not be able to get parts or the repair might be uneconomic. That term wouldn't concern me.

No terms and conditions written by the seller can usurp your statutory consumer rights. They override anything. People writing contracts habitually write this garbage in and as long as you know the current consumer legislation you can simply ignore anything that conflicts with it.

I had one like this a year or two back.
Seller advertised something online that I bought and paid for.
They shipped something else.
I complained.
They claimed "e&oe" on the website (errors and omissions excepted) and offered a refund.
I had to point out to their sales director that "e&oe" wasn't worth the pixels used to display it. It's a legacy set of weasel words that haven't been enforceable for years.
After a couple of assertive emails they sent the product they had advertised at the (rather good) price I'd paid for it ...
 
Aha, so 'warranty covers the repair or replacement of the product, at The Face Mask Store discretion' means that they can do either/ or, but under consumer rights they must do one or the other (for the first six months - I did a bit more reading). I was reading it as saying that they could do either of those things or nothing at all, depending on whether or not they wanted to - which would overwrite my consumer rights and thus be illegal.
OK, so the warranty is worth having, but not as good as the 3M one that'd come with it from authorised resellers.
Really appreciate you explaining that for me, Sideways.
 

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