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supplier of replacement chisel handles?

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disco_monkey79

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Years ago, my grandad gave me a couple of chunky Sorby pig-sticker morticing chisels. I'm finally using one on my latest project, but the other's handle is split, and needs replacing. Any idea on where I could source a replacement? I don't have a lathe to make my own.

Also, are there any threads on how to fit a new handle to a chisel? I've seen plenty on the pros and cons of wood/plastic, but none with a how-to guide for fitting.

Thanks
 

disco_monkey79

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Great, thanks for that. Mine has a four-sided tang, but I don;t see why the principles wouldn;t apply.

Will source a chunk of beech or similar, and give it a go!

Incidentally, is this the process you'd follow for replacing a "normal" bevel/former chisel handle?

Thanks!
 

marcros

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Those tend to be turned. i have a part set of stanley socketed chisels to do at some point when i get a lathe, some turning tools and some ability! I may complete the set and then treat myself to a days instruction, with the aim being to make the half dozen whilst there.

Have a look at post692238.html?hilit=stanley%20chisel%20challenge#p692238

How big a chunk of beech do you need. I may just have a bit you can have save you buying it.
 

Jacob

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They are really easy to make freehand. The trick is to get the tang fitted first into your blank, and only then start shaping it so it'll line up with the blade. Use plane, spokeshave, axe, draw knife, penknife, rasp, sandpaper, whatever you have to hand.
The right sized hedgerow stuff is perfect as it'll be straight grained and usually useless for anything else but firewood. Anything bigger is best reduced by cleaving so the grain stays straight.
 

jimi43

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All the pig stickers I have seen have had oval handles....



Here is one I repaired (the broken one above...



...purely to keep most of the original handle but if you are replacing one..I would definitely go for ash cleaved along the grain and then shave it down using a block plane...

I wouldn't even bother with sanding down afterwards...you should be able to get a fine, even oval without resorting to rubbing down and all the originals are quite rough anyway.

As for fitting the tang into the block you are going to use...I measure the width across the flats at the fat end and then choose the nearest narrower drill to drill into the block....only about 1/3 of the way. Then repeat with a smaller drill....and finally a smaller one leaving it about an inch shy of full depth.

Then fit the tang into the hole and tap the block on the bench...the tang will disappear and lock so firmly you won't be able to get it out if you wanted to!

As for replacement handles...I love boxwood ones...

You can often buy these on Fleabay as sets of handles removed from old chisels...or go to a bootfair and get some rubbish chisels with great handles about the same size and swap them over. I wouldn't fit new handles to the old ladies unless there isn't any alternative.

Jim
 

Argus

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Pig-Sticker chisels have oval section handles. These are fairly straightforward to do, and you don't need a lathe at all.
Derek Cohen posts here occasionally and has written it up on his blog.

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRestor ... hisel.html

You just need a chunk of Beech and a few basic hand tools.

If you're stuck send it to me....

.
 

Vann

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jimi43":5nr7ci41 said:
....and finally a smaller one leaving it about an inch shy of full depth.
Interesting. I have a few chisels that need rehandling (none OBM unfortunately as they fetch too high a price over here).

I have been intending to follow the same method as you describe, BUT I was going to take the final drill to about 1/8" shy of full depth - for fear of splitting the new handle (when I get a round tuit of course :oops: ).

Cheers, Vann.

Incidently: do you guys use the " symbol to indicate inches? You alway seem to write the word inch, whereas over here we nearly always used " in the days when youngsters knew what 25.4mm really was.
 

RogerP

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Vann":13a7hpwq said:
jimi43":13a7hpwq said:
....
Incidently: do you guys use the " symbol to indicate inches? You alway seem to write the word inch, whereas over here we nearly always used " in the days when youngsters knew what 25.4mm really was.
I generally do but you're right it does seem to be going out of fashion on the forum. Maybe because many now were brought up with the metric system.

It's left to us oldies to continue using ". :)
 

jimi43

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Yes Vann....it really is a toss up between potentially splitting the wood and tightness. For the first few, I would err towards deep drilling all the way with a smaller bore.

During the "official" metric transition a few years back now...I ordered some tools for work from a large supplier with "the" catalogue....

I wanted a 1" sheet metal hole punch and they put it on back order. The excuse? They were now only on special order as the new ones were metric. The nearest one could be supplied if I wanted....it was....yup....you guest it didn't you? 25.4mm!!

:roll:

Jim
 
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