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Some beginners technical terms questions

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Darren D

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There are some recurring topics and terms that come up in the forums that everyone seems to understand. Except me. Could someone please give me a hand with the following...

  • What is a Galoot and where did the term come from? I think it is something to do with using older tools or doing things traditionally but I can't quite put my finger on the definition. Who are the most and least galootish members of the forum?

  • Why do the English think dado cutters are dangerous and Americans don't? What does the rest of the world think? Who is right?

  • And a couple of plane questions as there is an interesting thread going on elsewhere full of terms and numbers that are confusing the life out of me. I understand the difference between bevel up and bevel down. And I thought that low angle was just an alternative term for bevel up. However, it now seems that I can buy a low angle smoother and a bevel up smoother and they are different. That's just not fair.

  • Finally, while I'm at it. Is there any logic to the Stanley (I think) plane numbering conventions? There doesn't seem to be. The 2 numbers/plane types I'm most interested in right now (I hope I've got this right) are 62 1/2 and 102 1/2. I think these are similar size block planes but one is a bit more adjustable than the other or have I missed the point completely! If so, why are the numbers so different.
Darren
 

Pete W

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The galoot derivation is fully explained here:
http://www.brendlers.net/oldtools/oldtools.html#Galoot

Even a brief look at the Hand Tools forum will reveal the uber-galoots :)

Use the 'search' feature for the complete history of the dado debate. I think anyone would agree that any sharp object spinning at high speed is dangerous - the question is whether it's acceptably dangerous. Some say yes, some say no.

The 'low angle' thing was the more usual description of bevel-up planes until quite recently. Then a flurry of debate pointed out that you could technically have a low-angle plane that was also bevel down, so 'bevel up' seems to have become the preferred usage.

There may have been some logic to the Stanley numbering once upon a time, but eventually, I think, the addition of extra planes forced them to abandon the logic. I'm sure Alf can give you chapter and verse on this one.
 

Alf

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Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
There are some recurring topics and terms that come up in the forums that everyone seems to understand. Except me.
I doubt you're alone, Darren. :D

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
What is a Galoot and where did the term come from?
Pete's pretty much covered the origin, but current use is slightly ambiguous. Personally I would say all Galoots are Neanderthals, but not all Neanderthals are Galoots. Others feel the terms are synonymous. I dare say at some point there'll be heated discussion about it. Again. Galoots are members of the Old Tools List and like Old Tools. Neanderthals are anybody's for the price of a drool of a hand tool of any vintage. Galoots In Training or GITs are properly offspring of Galoots, but sometimes new Galoots will refer to themselves as GITs. If they gloat about really cheap tools I tend to refer to them as GITs too... :wink: Some Galoots, like myself, are really closet Normathals or Neanderites with Tailed Apprentices and other Foul Things a Galoot Should Not Wot Of in Public. There is a move by one burgeoning magazine to call this "Blended" woodworking, but personally I don't want to sound like I mash up fruit to make smoothies, but whether I'm alone in this remains to be seen. The key thing to remember is all of these persons will respond to the term "woodworker". Unless they're c*ll*ct*rs, but that's a whole different thread.

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
Who are the most and least galootish members of the forum?
BugBear and, erm... Newbie_Neil maybe? He tends to break out in a rash if he wanders into the Hand Tool forum by mistake. :lol:

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
Why do the English think dado cutters are dangerous and Americans don't? What does the rest of the world think? Who is right?
Because 'Murricans laugh in the face of danger and believe freedom to kill yourself is a given right (see the Constitution), while the English have a mysterious body called the HSE who believe no-one has the right to snag so much as their tights 'cos it causes too much paperwork (see the absence of a Constitution). Which isn't a serious answer, but beats just saying "the archive has much discussion on this one".

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
I understand the difference between bevel up and bevel down.
Good man. Can you explain it to me? :D

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
And I thought that low angle was just an alternative term for bevel up.
It was, and indeed still is. Calling them "Bevel Up" is just a way to get folks to stop thinking of them as planes just for end grain with low cutting angles. But low angle is still applicable because the bedding angle remains low.

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
However, it now seems that I can buy a low angle smoother and a bevel up smoother and they are different. That's just not fair.
It's not is it? Blame that naughty Mr Lee; it's all his fault.

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
Finally, while I'm at it. Is there any logic to the Stanley (I think) plane numbering conventions?
If there is, it escapes me. Well there is a little bit, but as soon as you try to explain it about a dozen exceptions immediately spring to mind, so no, there's no logic.

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
The 2 numbers/plane types I'm most interested in right now (I hope I've got this right) are 62 1/2
Never a Stanley but the designation given to the wider L-V low angle/bevel up jack plane

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
and 102 1/2.
No such animal as far as I know. The nearest would be the #102.

Darren D":2qm35i2r said:
I think these are similar size block planes but one is a bit more adjustable than the other or have I missed the point completely!
I think some time spent on Blood & Gore as linked to by Adam, and possibly this section of the Old Tools FAQ may help. I would guess the first one you mean is the #60 1/2 low angle adjustable mouth block plane and the second the #102 low angle non-adjustable mouth block plane. Those are the two the decision usually comes down to anyway. :D

Cheers, Alf
 

Darren D

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Some Galoots, like myself, are really closet Normathals or Neanderites with Tailed Apprentices and other Foul Things a Galoot Should Not Wot Of in Public. There is a move by one burgeoning magazine to call this "Blended" woodworking
Well that's cleared that up then! #-o

You may also find some info on numbering here:

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html
Nice link thank you. Should keep me quiet for a bit.

Ta for your help
Darren
 
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