Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Sole of iron plane builds up with resin

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Marcel

Established Member
Joined
4 Jan 2010
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
In the middle of nowhere, Stevns, Denmark
Hello...

I have tried to search for an answer for this as it seems something very commom for hand plane use - maybe me not having an English mothertongue has been part of that..

Currently I am working on a table top that I 've made of sticks of Norwegian Pine glued together.

Now after the scrub plane I am using and no. 7 iron plane to get the top flat.

Due to the characteristics of this wood ( slow grown, lots of resin ) the sole of my plane is full of small particles that just stick to the sole and I can't get it of easely...

I would like to ask the forumates ( sp ?? ) if there is an easy way to get rid of this build up on the sole

Thank you in advance

Marcel
 

LuptonM

Established Member
Joined
2 Sep 2010
Messages
457
Reaction score
0
Location
Callington
Acetone on a paper towel. Works for allot of things (I haven't had this problem yet but I think it could work)

You could also try white spirit but the problem with white spirit is that it always seem to leave behind some oily residue
 

Harbo

Established Member
Joined
13 Nov 2006
Messages
5,548
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Not tried it myself but would rubbing the sole with candlewax prevent the build up resin?

Rod
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
Harbo":4wrm4me7 said:
Not tried it myself but would rubbing the sole with candlewax prevent the build up resin?

Rod

Yes, wax prevents build up, but it wears off and a plane sole can become gunged up with resin within seconds.
 

snikolaev28

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2011
Messages
28
Reaction score
0
Location
Ukraine, Dnepropetrovsk
I think you will need to renew wax from time to time - candle wax. But recommend you not use beeswax - it's sticks well.
Probably instead methanol you can dissolve resins with ethanol? Methanol isastrong poison in worldly very small cincentrations.

Serge
 

dunbarhamlin

Established Member
Joined
8 Jan 2007
Messages
936
Reaction score
0
Location
West Cornforth
Unfortunately our caring state likes to poison it's winos, so denatured eths usually has added meths (and other nasties)
 

MIGNAL

Established Member
Joined
6 Nov 2005
Messages
2,688
Reaction score
7
Location
W.York's
For a number of years I was under the same impression. It seems we are much kinder to the Winos than you think.

http://www.southend.nhs.uk/pathologyhan ... pirits.htm

It seems that you would have to be drinking the stuff in decent quantities to suffer damage. Very short skin contact and the risk must be either non existent or absolutely minimal.
The confusion may have occurred because in the US the methanol content can be much higher.
 

dunbarhamlin

Established Member
Joined
8 Jan 2007
Messages
936
Reaction score
0
Location
West Cornforth
Ah ok good. Will still pay the premium for the low pong, low meths, untinted stuff. Makes FP much more pleasurable. Though using poteen is a little too dear, and (just slightly) too watery (90% abv)
 

Jacob

Established Member
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
16,119
Reaction score
3
Location
Derbyshire
dunbarhamlin":2mjs07e7 said:
Unfortunately our caring state likes to poison it's winos, so denatured eths usually has added meths (and other nasties)
It still works tho', for everything except getting pineappled! It's an acquired taste (I'm told).
Surgical spirit has a less unacceptable bouquet.

Resin - hot air gun (or any source of warmth) and scraper.

NB its not "very commom for hand plane use" it's the wood's fault - or possibly the glue's.
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,029
Reaction score
472
Location
Bristol
I believe this problem (of resin build-up on the sole) was the reason why steel plane makers introduced corrugated base planes. The trouble is that as they are no longer made, they are rare and collectable, so may cost more than you want to pay to solve the problem.

This sort of thing:

 

Richard T

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2009
Messages
1,743
Reaction score
0
Location
Wet Midlands
The best solvent for pine resin that I have found is butter. Butter IMHO is the best for getting it off everything except a band saw .... you don't want buttery bandsaw tires.
But everything else - great! - Hands, arms, handles, blades .... and, of course, the butter can then be washed off with soap and water.
 

Vann

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2008
Messages
1,836
Reaction score
8
Location
Petone, New Zealand
AndyT":2lnnva40 said:
I believe this problem (of resin build-up on the sole) was the reason why steel plane makers introduced corrugated base planes. The trouble is that as they are no longer made..
...except by Lie-Nielsen.
AndyT":2lnnva40 said:
...may cost more than you want to pay to solve the problem.]
That's certainly true of Lie-Nielsen planes, with or without corrugations :!:

Cheers, Vann.
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
Marcel":20qqq55h said:
**SOLVED**

Thank you all for most your valuable input.

Since I had the Methylated spirit and a scraper, that was te solution I opted for and it worked wonderful.

If planing particularly resinous timber I generally keep a shallow tub of methylated spirit nearby so I can occasionally dip the sole of a plane to disolve resin and wipe the sole using either paper towel or a cloth before re-waxing.

We tend to keep our corrugated planes solely for resinous timbers such as teak, pine, etc. and simply ensure their soles are well waxed before and after use.
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
bugbear":isoay4a8 said:
GazPal":isoay4a8 said:
our corrugated planes...
Loving the plural.

BugBear
It's no good working in a cabintemaking workshop and having to share tools when using the same timber types, so yes, we have a few corrugated soled planes, but all were bought well before collectors began driving prices higher. :)
 

Latest posts

Top