Sharpening a gouge

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disco_monkey79

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Apologies if this is well-trodden ground, but I wasn't able to find an answer with the search function.

Anywho, I have rounded gouge, where the bevel is on the inside of the curve(if that makes sense), so I'm not sure how to sharpen it? One website suggested using a grinding stone in a pillar drill, but this doesn't sound like the way it would have been done (but I'm prepared to be corrected!).

Your advice is much appreciated, as I need to use it to make part of the OH's christmas prez!

Thanks
 

disco_monkey79

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Hi,

Many thanks for the reply. I can;t quite make it out in the pic, but I take it the edge/s is/are profiled?

Thanks
 

Racers

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Hi,

Yes the long edges have a profile on so you can do the inside of a gouge.


Pete
 

Richard T

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slip.jpg


In nicked this photo off the interweb.
They are sometimes described as tapered or teardrop slip stones and come in both oil and water varieties.
 

woodbloke

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disco_monkey79":2y3rer91 said:
I have rounded gouge, where the bevel is on the inside of the curve(if that makes sense)
If I understand you correctly, what you have there is a scribing gouge and it's very difficult to sharpen accurately (which means getting the honed angles correct and keeping the edge square to the sides) I use a Proxxon mini-grinder with very fine grinding wheels to get the edge, then a shaped mdf wheel running in the pillar drill for the final polish - Rob
 

CHJ

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Last time I recovered some badly damaged Incannel gouges for someone I used a narrow white oxide grinding wheel with the periphery contoured to just under the smallest radius and used that to put new bevels on, then polished up with Slipper stones by hand, followed by final burnishing on a MDF disc.

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bosshogg

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OK, use and sharpen incannel gouges all the time, I just call them inside gouges, and the opposites outside gouges.
I suppose they can be difficult to sharpen if your not used to it, I learned so long ago...Ahhh!... anyway, here's my technique - (by the way, never grind across the gouge as this produces grinding marks in the wrong direction) if grinding at all do so like a chisel i.e. with the wheel turning towards you. Basically I grind on the corner edge of the wheel when the gouge size allows, otherwise a coarse slip (as shown in Richard's post) either using the big or small diameter as required. I mount mine in the vice, either longitudinally or perpendicular to the jaws, it doesn't matter, a little oil on the stone and holding the gouge at the angle you wish to produce, go back and forth, keeping the angle constant (admittedly I tend to use a diamond hone for my small dia. gouges these days)
gouge honing set up.jpg
Continue this until you get a singular grain running from front to back. You should rotate the gouge through it's ark on the stone until you get the same profile at the back, as you have at the front of the bevel, but don't worry if this is not perfect, something like this is ok -
gouge shape of bevel.jpg
or this -
gouge bevel.jpg


Hope this helps...bosshogg :)

I never teach my pupils. I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.
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Melzy

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I have never heard of an Incannel gouge before!! what are the purpose of these then?!

Intrigued!

Mel

:roll:
 

CHJ

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Think in terms of carving chisels, the outer form produces the hollow shape most near that which you require, the cutting edge relief being on the inside of the curve.
 

AndyT

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Melzy":11xgca3d said:
I have never heard of an Incannel gouge before!! what are the purpose of these then?!

Intrigued!

Mel

:roll:

The classic use is in making a scribed joint, as on a moulding where one piece meets another at right angles.

IMG_3470.jpg


You could just make a mitre, but that could shrink and open up; a scribed joint makes a cut on one piece that fits the outside of the other.

First, you make a mitre like this:

IMG_3475.jpg


Then you use an in-cannel gouge to cut a curve (on plan) with the tool held vertical:

IMG_3476.jpg
 
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