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Sealing up a garage door

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vaderag

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So I'm in the process of planning my workshop build.
We have a terrible garage - one of the old concrete prefabs with asbestos roof. It has holes everywhere and the wood (where it has it) is rotting

First step is to fix up the rotten soffits and window frames, which is all well and good, then we're rendering the thing for attractiveness (and somewhat sealing)
But one job I'm not sure how to tackle is the garage door

We've lived here 3 years now and I havent had the door open once, and I can't see me ever needing to (I don't actually have the key!) but I've been storing my lumber on a table in front of it for now. I'd like to actually board the inside of it and add some french cleat storage on that wall

The main issue I have is that the garage door has a huge threshold underneath that lets in water when it rains heavily... it also has gaps at the top since it was fitted poorly orginally... so looking for some thoughts/advice on sealing it up

Current thought is to run an angled plinth at the bottom on the outside, attached to the door to divert water, silicone from the inside to block as best as possible, then run a dpm across the wall before sticking some OSB in front attached to some vertical beams.
But, it feels a bit bodgey, so very open to other thoughts!

Thanks!
 

vaderag

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If it is going to be a permanent thing then could you block or brick up the opening ?
The thought did occur to me, but was thinking that I would like to keep the garage door as a 'just in case' - i.e. if i decide to build something 'big' in the future or if we decide to sell and the new buyers would prefer a garage door etc...
So demolishing a bit of wood panelling in that case would be a little easier
 

pe2dave

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I've an up and over door that let in water if the wind blew in X direction.
Treated timber, 2x1 (ish). Layer of (any sort of) waterproof mastic kind of stuff on the floor.
Carefully position the timber up to (not interfering with) the door.
Screw through to the floor (concrete in my case).
Watertight to 'blown' wind ever since.

Lux bit.
In case you need to wheel stuff over the threshold, shape it to make that job easier?
A (rectangle with inward sloping sides?) - todays geometry test! ;-)
 

Craig22

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I count myself lucky - my workshop is in the single width garage. Up and over door, and not one drop of rain gets in. Dry leaves in Autumn, and spiders, yes. And whoever built the garage put a slight fall in the concrete floor towards the door, which I'm sure is a contributory factor to lack of rain access.

The only time the door gets opened (other than sweeping leaves out!) is if I'm putting long timber through the bandsaw. I put a couple of roller guides on the drive, set to the same height as the bandsaw table.

So I'm not sure what the solution is to the OP's particular problems though. Getting the door working, or replacing it might be a good start. That will probably be necessary to get any machines in. The asbestos roof made me shudder though.
 

vaderag

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I've an up and over door that let in water if the wind blew in X direction.
Treated timber, 2x1 (ish). Layer of (any sort of) waterproof mastic kind of stuff on the floor.
Carefully position the timber up to (not interfering with) the door.
Screw through to the floor (concrete in my case).
Watertight to 'blown' wind ever since.

Lux bit.
In case you need to wheel stuff over the threshold, shape it to make that job easier?
A (rectangle with inward sloping sides?) - todays geometry test! ;-)
Thanks! Sounds like the exact problem I have! Is the bar inside? (Sounds like it just wanted to confirm)

I count myself lucky - my workshop is in the single width garage. Up and over door, and not one drop of rain gets in. Dry leaves in Autumn, and spiders, yes. And whoever built the garage put a slight fall in the concrete floor towards the door, which I'm sure is a contributory factor to lack of rain access.

The only time the door gets opened (other than sweeping leaves out!) is if I'm putting long timber through the bandsaw. I put a couple of roller guides on the drive, set to the same height as the bandsaw table.

So I'm not sure what the solution is to the OP's particular problems though. Getting the door working, or replacing it might be a good start. That will probably be necessary to get any machines in. The asbestos roof made me shudder though.
That's a good point actually. I think most of what I want in at least today goes through the side door, but maybe I should consider the future expansion. That's said, if I do need to use the door I could always remove the board, but maybe I should leave the door available... Only problem is that I actually lose half the space to the kids garden stuff so was hoping to gain an unused wall.. l. Food for thought
 

pe2dave

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@vaderag - yes, I closed the door, aligned the wood (make sure the door opens OK. Marked with chalk, then fastened it down.
And yes, the door is still usable? My door opens outwards at the bottom, so the wood doesn't get in the way of opening.
 

Lons

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I did something for one of my mates about 15 years ago but on a 4m wide garage door. The door was set back into a reveal so about 75mm brickwork available and I just made up a frame from 50 x 50mm timber to be a tight fit, kept the bottom rail 50mm high off the concrete and pinned a length of DPC to the front along the bottom before cladding for which I used hollow pvc cladding, the stuff I used was 300 wide but with the effect of 3x100mm planks, I glued it to the frame with no nails type adhesive and pinned through the back part of the groove at each point of contact with the frame, totally waterproof, maintenance free, looks like a garage door from a distance, draughtproof and removeable with very little repair work needed as I fitted with just a few screws into the original door frame, I decided not to use silicone so just stuck window draught foam tape around the door frame so even less work on removal. It's still there as originally fitted and he cleans it regularly so it's still looking good.
Cladding was fitted horizontally which is what he preferred but vertical would have been cheaper as less waste and the bottom row fitted to overlap the frame down on to the DPC just a few mm above ground level to accommodate the uneven concrete drive, as long as the DPC is pushed down on to the ground there's no water ingress.
 

Sachakins

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Maybe consider building a frame and fit a standard house door to one side. Easy to seal the frame, then board and insulate. The offset will give you wall space and the door access for larger stuff. Go for a three foot door, or even four foot French door pair. Easy to secure internally and gives large access if you need it in the future.
 

Sachakins

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Have a look in for sale section, nice garage door at reasonable price😎
 

Wood&StuffLtd

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So I'm in the process of planning my workshop build.
We have a terrible garage - one of the old concrete prefabs with asbestos roof. It has holes everywhere and the wood (where it has it) is rotting

First step is to fix up the rotten soffits and window frames, which is all well and good, then we're rendering the thing for attractiveness (and somewhat sealing)
But one job I'm not sure how to tackle is the garage door

We've lived here 3 years now and I havent had the door open once, and I can't see me ever needing to (I don't actually have the key!) but I've been storing my lumber on a table in front of it for now. I'd like to actually board the inside of it and add some french cleat storage on that wall

The main issue I have is that the garage door has a huge threshold underneath that lets in water when it rains heavily... it also has gaps at the top since it was fitted poorly orginally... so looking for some thoughts/advice on sealing it up

Current thought is to run an angled plinth at the bottom on the outside, attached to the door to divert water, silicone from the inside to block as best as possible, then run a dpm across the wall before sticking some OSB in front attached to some vertical beams.
But, it feels a bit bodgey, so very open to other thoughts!

Thanks!
When I turned my attached garage with its metal up and over door into a wood turning workshop I got a double glazing firm to install a screen with double doors and side windows with top hung vents. Works very well but did cost £2k. It matches the doors and windows of the rest of the house including lead pattered glass.
 

RichardG

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I converted my double garage, in one door I fitted a pvcu french door, I ended up buying new as the height was a little lower that most of the used ones available and I got fed up waiting. In the other door I got a window from the same company but it was a mis measure so it was half price. I built a 3 brick plinth and then filled in with studwork, then covered the whole front with breathable membrane and feather edge. You'd never know it was a garage now.

Definitely worth checking with the local pvcu companies, one near us has a room full of miss measures and un collected items, surprising number of used on Guntree if you can collect and not fussy on size/colour.

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