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scribing to fit conundrum

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Bluekingfisher

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Morning fellahs - As part of the kitchen refit I have built a breakfast bar and intend to use a single large wood veneer panel matching the cabinets to cover the back of the kitchen base units.

The units protrude 90 degrees from the wall and measure 72" long. I have fitted the wooden worktops and then realised I will have to srcibe the panel to fit between the underside of the work top and floor. The measurements of which vary between 34 - 34 1/2" (not in a continuous slope) so will need to be scribed.

I am confident on how to scribe the lenght against the wall but how do I scribe accurately between the underside of the work top and floor?. Obviously I don't want to remove the work top as it is connected to the other worktops.

I suppose I could just cut it to the highest point dimension and use a lenght of bead to cover the gap but this doesn't seem the way forward for a woodworker??

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

David
 

RogerM

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How about scribing a shorter offcut of something, like mdf or hardboard and then use that as a template to cut the veneered board?
 

bugbear

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RogerM":3m6cu75v said:
How about scribing a shorter offcut of something, like mdf or hardboard and then use that as a template to cut the veneered board?
Yes - that's roughly similar to how tilers do it.

BugBear
 

fuster

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Agree the only way you can do it right is to use a template. Use two pieces of mdf/hardboard or plastic that overlap in the middle, one for the top half and one for the bottom and mark the line where they overlap,
 

Bluekingfisher

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Thanks fellahs, why I never thought of that I don't know. I guess I was looking for the difficult way to do it #-o
 

Jacob

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Get the bottom edge to fit first and then just take off the straight top edge until it fits under the top The top edge will be hidden by the overhang of the top anyway, so a little error will be invisible (if I've understood it correctly!).
 

scholar

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The way I do this is to cut some strips of plywood - 6mm is ideal - and scribe one to each of the sides of the space to be fitted. I usually roughly mitre the corners for a good fit into the corners.

I then join the corners with some small plywood or mdf plates hot glued, sometimes with some additional bracing across the template, if it is a bit unwieldy. Then you have a perfect template to mark up the finished piece.

Here is one I did earlier



Hot glue is really useful for these jobs...

Cheers
 

wcndave

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If there's a toekick at the bottom, (where else...), then the top edge is hidden under overhang, and the bottom edge can be straight...
 

moppetsdad

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When I worked in a boatyard the way that the boat fitters did things like that was they first cut a sheet of hard board well under size then went all round the edges with two inch masking tape then scribed all round using a piece of wood or something like and then transfered the measurements to the wood that had to be fitted and bingo a perfect fit every time. They did that with some very funny shaped bulkheads and it worlked every time.
 
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