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steve355

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Hi guys

I’m coming to realise that putting a consistent profile on the bottom of a moulding plane is an extremely difficult business, due to the requirement for longitudinal flatness along all the surfaces.

So I need to upgrade my little home-made scratch stock, to incorporate a fence et cetera.

My question, though, does anybody have any thoughts on what is the best type of blade material to use? The only spring steel I have lying around is a couple of sheets that were spare from when I re-bladed my dovetail saw. It is 0.3 mm. I think it is a little flimsy for a scratch stock.

My tenon saw blade thickness is 0.6 mm. This looks a lot more suitable. So I could order a piece of that. Shame that the car boot sales have now finished this year.

Steve
 
Just the teeth.

Some recent ones I made for doing stuff.


Scrapers resize.JPG
 
I have a metre lenghth of a large bandsaw blade, (about 50 mm wide and 1mm thick) from a Timber Mill. I have been cutting off pieces for years for scratch stocks. I cut a piece about 150mm long that I have cut profiles all around its circumference, which I use as it is.
 
Hi
Hi guys

I’m coming to realise that putting a consistent profile on the bottom of a moulding plane is an extremely difficult business, due to the requirement for longitudinal flatness along all the surfaces.

So I need to upgrade my little home-made scratch stock, to incorporate a fence et cetera.

My question, though, does anybody have any thoughts on what is the best type of blade material to use? The only spring steel I have lying around is a couple of sheets that were spare from when I re-bladed my dovetail saw. It is 0.3 mm. I think it is a little flimsy for a scratch stock.

My tenon saw blade thickness is 0.6 mm. This looks a lot more suitable. So I could order a piece of that. Shame that the car boot sales have now finished this year.

Steve
 
Hi Steve.
I used an old metal ruler . Made the shape with a grinder in a mini drill. It performed well and stayed sharp moulding beech profile.
 

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or you could take a boot sale handsaw and cut up the blade. Score em with a carbide laminate cutter and they break (DO wear safety glassses) and you've got a lifetime supply for a few sheckles
 
A little chamfering and oil and mine looks more respectable.

Obviously these are usually used for putting decorative profiles on the edges of things. I have a couple more requirements though, given it’s purpose is to true up moulding plane profiles.

1) the cutter needs to be registered square to the stock and stay put
2) the “bar” of the scratch stock needs to act as a depth stop, meaning that there should be a means to make sure the depth of the cutter can be fixed
2) the cutter needs to be ground very accurately

That’s todays project then.


IMG_4424.jpeg
 
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