RUST Prevention on TOOLS- I am giving up on Camellia Oil...

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bentontool

Retired... with no complaints!
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Hello Brothers,
I have read so many positive comments on the use of camellia oil for rust prevention that I bought a big (huge) bottle of it... only to be sorely disappointed! :((n)(n)(n)
I am going back to using paste wax!
The problem that I have found with camellia oil is that it gums-up on whatever I coat with it! It also has gummed-up on my oiler-in-a-can (as in Paul Sellers).
Each time I go back to using my stored tools, I have to use a thinner on the item to remove the gummy oil residue, even after only a few days! VERY ANNOYING!
Has anyone else had this problem?
What are you all using? :)
 
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Hello Brothers,
I have read so many positive comments on the use of camellia oil for rust prevention that I bought a big (huge) bottle of it... only to be sorely disappointed! :((n)(n)(n)
I am going back to using paste wax!
The problem that I have found with camellia oil is that it gums-up on whatever I coat with it! It also has gummed-up on my oiler-in-a-can (as in Paul Sellers).
Each time I go back to using my stored tools, I have to use a thinner on the item to remove the gummy oil residue, even after only a few days! VERY ANNOYING!
Has anyone else had this problem?
What are you all using? :)
My go to is acf 50 and yes you will need to wipe it off prior to using the tool but you only need a little and it wipes off easy . Available in aerosol and atomiser type bottle..
 
My go to is acf 50 and yes you will need to wipe it off prior to using the tool but you only need a little and it wipes off easy . Available in aerosol and atomiser type bottle..
Thanks for the tip. I was doing a little research and found that some of these anti-rust products contain PTEF. Have you found any problems with "orange-peel" effect on finishes like one may get with silicone products? I do not know if PTEF causes the same issues.
 
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Thanks for the tip. I was doing a little research and found that some of these anti-rust products contain PTEF. Have you found any problems with "orange-peel" effect on finishes like one may get with silicone products? I do not know if PTEF cause the same issues.
No all good , if I’m doing anything that will be finished with anything like oil varnish or wax etc I make sure the tools are clean and free from any anti rust coating. I’ve learned the hard way that you can easily cross contaminate oil from tools to your work and it not visible until the finish goes on ..
 
Has anyone else had this problem?
What are you all using? :)
No. And i'm surprised.
Camellia is almost water thin and you don't use lots. A slightly dampened cloth or a few drops on your palm and wipe it on as a thin film. Think wet it then wipe it all off. It's the residual trace that lingers in the surface irregularities of the metal that you want. It's something to protect your tools day to day in use. Anything longer than a week or two and they are still at risk of rust.
If you are having problems of gumming up, it sounds like your oil is much thicker than it should be, more cooking oil than sewing machine oil, and you're applying far too much.

There are better modern alternatives, but as a natural product camellia is nicer when you are routinely wiping it on and off with your hands.
 
I find paste wax to be the most convenient method, which works most of the time against moisture in the air. It does not do much against active water droplets (e.g. when my bandsaw was left next to the open garage door and it was windy and raining outside.).

If you have not seen these yet, they might be worth watching:


 
I've always found that a heat source in a tool cabinet is the best way to prevent rust build up; no oils or waxes ever needed. The old photo below shows a 25 watt bulb in one of my tool cabinets. Bulbs were a bit of a pain needing frequent replacement and care in putting tools in to avoid breakage of the bulb. For the last twelve or so years the lightbulbs have been replaced by small 20Watt anti condensation heaters (small image from Farnell at end) which seem to last forever having been left running continuously since their installation, with just one eventually failing a couple of years ago and needing replacement. Slainte.

Toolboxheated.jpg


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Another vote for ACF-50 and Liberon Lubricating Wax.

I have a shed workshop and live on the coast so have lots of humidity + salt that attacks tools and machines. I am winning the fight to keep on top of corrosion and rust, but it is a constant effort. I do find that ACF-50 if applied too liberally does gum up.
 
I've always found that a heat source in a tool cabinet is the best way to prevent rust build up; no oils or waxes ever needed. The old photo below shows a 25 watt bulb in one of my tool cabinets. Bulbs were a bit of a pain needing frequent replacement and care in putting tools in to avoid breakage of the bulb. For the last twelve or so years the lightbulbs have been replaced by small 20Watt anti condensation heaters (small image from Farnell at end) which seem to last forever having been left running continuously since their installation, with just one eventually failing a couple of years ago and needing replacement. Slainte.

I like this, but if a lightbulb is on 24/7 it's costing you £55 a year to keep that cupboard warm.
Worth spending a little on something with a thermostat.
 
No. And i'm surprised.
Camellia is almost water thin and you don't use lots. A slightly dampened cloth or a few drops on your palm and wipe it on as a thin film. Think wet it then wipe it all off. It's the residual trace that lingers in the surface irregularities of the metal that you want. It's something to protect your tools day to day in use. Anything longer than a week or two and they are still at risk of rust.
If you are having problems of gumming up, it sounds like your oil is much thicker than it should be, more cooking oil than sewing machine oil, and you're applying far too much.

There are better modern alternatives, but as a natural product camellia is nicer when you are routinely wiping it on and off with your hands.
Hello Sideways,
Thanks for your reply.
Addendum: mine is not "water-thin". It is more like a light cooking oil. It certainly has some body to it.***
If memory serves, I purchased a small spray bottle of Camellia Oil from one of the larger woodworking tool outlets years ago that was made in Japan. I did not use it on an "oil can" at the time. In retrospect, I do not recall having the same gumming issues with that small bottle.
My current bottle of camellia oil was purchased on Amazon: "Dr Joe Lab Camellia Seed Oil is 100% Natural Pure Cold-Pressed Japanese Camellia Seed Oil Grade A". They fail to specify where it is made... China, I suspect. ***Perhaps I have purchased an adulterated product?
How does one prevent the oil from gumming-up on the cloth of the oil can, where it must be applied liberally?
I am thinking of experimenting with a dilution of 50% Camellia Oil and 50% paint thinner.
 
Another vote for ACF-50 and Liberon Lubricating Wax.

I have a shed workshop and live on the coast so have lots of humidity + salt that attacks tools and machines. I am winning the fight to keep on top of corrosion and rust, but it is a constant effort. I do find that ACF-50 if applied too liberally does gum up.
Hello sams93.
As suggested by you, themack, and bingy man, I am eager to try ACF-50 (I wish it were less expensive!). But apparently, it also may gum-up on my oil can (according to the YouTube videos I have watched, it may gum-up if applied liberally).
How do you get around that? You do not use an oil can?
So, in summary, I suppose I am looking for a product that is reliably "anti-rust" but does not gum-up!
I will certainly purchase a bottle of "Liberon Lubricating Wax"! (again an addendum: it appears to only be available in the UK! :()
 
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How does one prevent the oil from gumming-up on the cloth of the oil can, where it must be applied liberally?
I am thinking of experimenting with a dilution of 50% Camellia Oil and 50% paint thinner.
I've never used rag in a can with camelia. You need so little that wetting a cloth would increase consumption 20x. A cloth damped with camelia is dry the next day. It must evaporate or dry.
I use a pump spray bottle, small squirt onto my palm or fingers and just wipe it on the blade, swiping off at the sharp end :)
I use mostly with chisels.

Another suggestion is hydrogenated mineral oil. Completely clear. This is like sewing machine oil. Thin. Hydrogenation resists polymerising so doesn't want to gum up. Use sparingly for a barely visible (microns) film.
 
I use Bri-wax ie: "furniture wax" have used it for years one thing I found warm up the metal first and the wax will soak in a little.
I even used Bri-wax on my garden spade and fork just need to re-coat more often.
 
Hello sams93.
As suggested by you, themack, and bingy man, I am eager to try ACF-50 (I wish it were less expensive!). But apparently, it also may gum-up on my oil can (according to the YouTube videos I have watched, it may gum-up if applied liberally).
How do you get around that? You do not use an oil can?
So, in summary, I suppose I am looking for a product that is reliably "anti-rust" but does not gum-up!
I will certainly purchase a bottle of "Liberon Lubricating Wax"! (again an addendum: it appears to only be available in the UK! :()
ACF-50 lasts for absolutely ages. You can get it either in an aerosol can or in a pump spray bottle.

The thing is, there isn't a product that will work for everything. For tables i.e planer table or table saw, you're better off with a paste wax or liberon, for hand tools, whatever you use will wear off in use, so I prefer to give the surfaces I hold a wipe of ACF-50 before putting them away.

The other thing which is really useful for tools which are hard to reach or where it is irritating to keep oiling them are VCI corrosion inhibitors. Effectively they are bits of paper or discs which have been impregnated in a volatile substance which then leeches out into the air and coats everything metal around it. They only work in enclosed spaces i.e boxes etc, but if you store you tools in a toolbox then it works well. I put a lot of my tools in plastic tubs for storage i.e tracksaw and it works very well for these kind of things where you cannot possibly hope to oil them completely after each use. Again these last for years, and are actually quite economical (box of 10 ends up at £3 per disc). I use these ones from Shield Technology in the UK but i'm sure there must be someone making them in the US. They don't leave any noticeable residue but I will warn you if you touch the paper and then somehow get it in your mouth they taste bloody awful!!!

A cursory google suggests you can get them across the pond: https://www.corrosionvci.com/corrosion/products.php?cat=72
 
I like this, but if a lightbulb is on 24/7 it's costing you £55 a year to keep that cupboard warm.
Worth spending a little on something with a thermostat.
I don't know if a thermostat exists with the type of heaters I showed. Anyway, I really don't mind, if your number is right, paying about £1 per week to prevent rust on quite a lot of my tools; it might even be cheaper than letting my tools get rusty leading to repair or replacement. Also, bear in mind the picture showed just one half of a tool cabinet; the hidden half stores routers and router cutters, plus a bunch of stuff in the drawers at the top. Slainte.
 
I don't know if a thermostat exists with the type of heaters I showed. Anyway, I really don't mind, if your number is right, paying about £1 per week to prevent rust on quite a lot of my tools; it might even be cheaper than letting my tools get rusty leading to repair or replacement. Also, bear in mind the picture showed just one half of a tool cabinet; the hidden half stores routers and router cutters, plus a bunch of stuff in the drawers at the top. Slainte.
I have a dehumidifier running 24/7 in the shed workshop, it draws 30w = £60 per year. Agree that is a bargain for keeping my tools and machines rust free!
 

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