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Rounded opening hollow form

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SVB

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Folks,

Output from the b/h weekend. Simple hollow form in rippled ash. Coloured with chestnut sprit stains, gloss cel lacquer finish and burnished to deep shine.

I tried something different with this one, added 1/8” plain timber base post colouring to give the piece some ‘lift’ when placed on the dark wood sideboard surface at home. Not sure about it, may or may not keep it in the long term.

Comments welcome.

Simon


79770B41-5076-46CF-87FA-CB0C6E688A9A.jpeg


FC2B3CBC-0FB0-48EC-8E31-66107278210C.jpeg
 

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Dalboy

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I like the shape of the hollow form it is well preportioned, but feel that the little base does nothing for it. As for the staining, the black is good but would like to see maybe a red, blue or green complementary colour.
Other than that a good piece but please remember this is just my thoughts and does not mean it is wrong in any shape or form.
 

SVB

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Many thanks for the comments and constructive thoughts. Building on a couple of your points....

Dalboy":2kn9964l said:
feel that the little base does nothing for it.
Thanks for honesty - as I said, I wan’t sure on this one but wanted to try something different (even if it is to know it is wrong rather than be ever wondering!)

Dalboy":2kn9964l said:
As for the staining, the black is good but would like to see maybe a red, blue or green complementary colour.
Maybe my poor photography here, the base colour is royal blue, sanded back and purple over laid, sanded back again and light blue applied before final sanding. Looks dark but as light catches it the colours come through, esp on the ripple.

Simon
 

Dalboy

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SVB":3qnxfded said:
Maybe my poor photography here, the base colour is royal blue, sanded back and purple over laid, sanded back again and light blue applied before final sanding. Looks dark but as light catches it the colours come through, esp on the ripple.

Simon
This is something that many people find getting the colours or an effect to show up on a photo can be a nightmare. It is like taking a photo and then realising that there is a sanding mark or some other fault that you missed.

This is two of the centrepieces that I did for one of my latest pieces which I stained black then rubbed back to leave some of the stain in the softer wood before going over with the lighter colour, in this case, red and green

20190825_172707 (768x1024).jpg
 

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KimG

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Nice Hollow form, good shape and nice to see some adventurous use of colour, even if it doesn't come through in the pic, the description showed the work.

Feet are tricky things, I am often in two minds about having them or not, especially on bowls, they tend to be redundant on stuff like hollow forms though, which really need that flowing uninterrupted curve to make their statement.

I like the two coloured centers as well, must be a trick of the light but the red one is very Salvador Dali, looks like it is melting over the table edge! Good colouring though, I would be well pleased with a result like that.

Incidentally, when colouring with several colours, it is best to use the lightest colour first, and to leave a small area or two not overlaid with the next colour, this helps to show off the variety, or to thin the next colour for the overlay in parts. Using the dark colour first will prevent lighter colours from showing well.
 

Dalboy

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KimG":3tvfd9ur said:
Incidentally, when colouring with several colours, it is best to use the lightest colour first, and to leave a small area or two not overlaid with the next colour, this helps to show off the variety, or to thin the next colour for the overlay in parts. Using the dark colour first will prevent lighter colours from showing well.
I would normally agree Kim but for the two centre burrs I did for my Two Faces piece the technique is dark colour first then rub down leaving the dark colour in the soft grain and sanding back to natural wood before adding the colour of choice(lighter colour)
 

RickG

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Nice shape there, Simon. I like the soft contour of the opening and the overall shape.

If you're going to make a foot, I believe it should be more obvious and give something positive to the composition of the piece. I'm sure this isn't so with this, but with a subtle base such as this, fellow turners could easily mistakenly think it covers a problem where you went through the bottom.
Thanks for posting though. Its thought provoking.
 

KimG

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Dalboy":1fcx7jmf said:
KimG":1fcx7jmf said:
Incidentally, when colouring with several colours, it is best to use the lightest colour first, and to leave a small area or two not overlaid with the next colour, this helps to show off the variety, or to thin the next colour for the overlay in parts. Using the dark colour first will prevent lighter colours from showing well.
I would normally agree Kim but for the two centre burrs I did for my Two Faces piece the technique is dark colour first then rub down leaving the dark colour in the soft grain and sanding back to natural wood before adding the colour of choice(lighter colour)
True enough Derek, Like all things to do with artistic expression, there are always exceptions to the rule, it all depends on what outcome you want.
 
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