Removing a wash hand basin

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Jacob

New Luddism. Awake and resist!
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Ordinary modern WHB on a pedestal, VitrA S20 against tiled plasterboard. I've got to take it off. Can't see how.
Have peered into holes with a mirror but seems to have no fixings other than white mastic itself.
Is this likely, or could there be hidden fixings? Some sort of french cleat which you could drop it on and cover?
 
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Has no fixings or has no other provision for fixing?

Quite possible given the mistaken sense of self-importance many so-called plumbers live beneath (far too busy/skilled/well paid people to be drilling holes through tiles and installing suitable plasterboard anchors).

This is not helped by the claims of the people marketing CT1 adhesive/sealer/magic.

Toilet cisterns are another class of item that is now "fixed" in the same way.

Best thing I found to remove them is the square-section wire used for cutting out car windscreens.
 
Has no fixings or has no other provision for fixing?
Is already fixed, nothing visible in the holes in the back.
Trying to remove it, but no sign of fixings other than mastic.
Sounds like I've got to cut through the mastic?
Haven't got any suitable wire - might try a guitar string.
 
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It's not the most common type but some handbasins are hung on brackets pre fixed to the wall and the basin drops on so you can't see the brackets. More often when there's no pedestal and they are a pain to remove without taking off at least one row of splashback tiles.
Just an option to think about, they do exist because I've fitted them, just make sure possible bolts between basin and pedestall are removed and all silicone is cut to release it.
 
You may find there’s rom to use a hacksaw blade to slice through the "glue" Jacob, it will also show you where any screws are. Are you concerned about damaging the tiles?

EDIT, I have never understood why more people don’t stash away the unused bits and pieces like tiles from work in their houses, always handy and good to hand onto the next owner of the property.
 
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depends on the age, solid fixings were once used but would be evident, then we used brackets that used rubber bungs that expanded when tightened that went into holes in the rear of the sink but with torch and mirror should also be evident and now it seems the trend is for mastic / silicon on everything so a sharp serrated bread knife can work depending on the style of the sink. Another option is silicon remover to help break it down,

https://www.wickes.co.uk/UniBond-Silicone-Sealant-Remover-Tube---80ml/p/287737
 
....a sharp serrated bread knife can work

That is a good idea. Some lubrication with soapy water can help it go through the cut. Silicone is quite 'grippy', so once an incision is made, a small wooden wedge is good to stop the cut closing up.

Any of the slicing methods would deny or confirm the presence of other fixings in a manner non-destructive to those fixings were they to exist.

Guitar string is a good idea. Maybe a watch once used by 007 could be used.
 
I've removed a few from tiles that have been well sealed with silicone. It will break both the basin and pull the tiles from the wall if you try to force it. I have a roll of fishing trace wire that i fasten to a couple of pieces of wood to make a garott and saw through the sealant. I have never seen one you could slide a blade down behind, The gap is less than 1mm once the basin is pressed up against the wall.

Gerry
 
I had to use a piece of broken bandsaw blade to remove the toilet cistern at our last house to get through the silicon. As it is thin, flexible and has decent coarse teeth it makes a great pull saw in tight spaces. I now keep a broken blade for such jobs.

Colin
 
Thanks for the comments. Looks like I've got to cut it off then!
The problem is that they have put copper pipes in which make it impossible to reach the trap and unblock it, which needs doing. The pedestal is loose but can't get it past the bowl. I might have a look at it again before I saw the sink off the wall. Might be simpler to smash the pedestal and replace it with something nice and woody.
 
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A couple of months ago I removed a WHB that was fixed to the wall using a couple of french cleat style brackets (each one about 1" long). It just lifted off. Of course I didn't realise that until I'd started removing screws. Yours could be similar but with the screws hidden under the basin.
Have fun
Martin
 
A couple of months ago I removed a WHB that was fixed to the wall using a couple of french cleat style brackets (each one about 1" long). It just lifted off. Of course I didn't realise that until I'd started removing screws. Yours could be similar but with the screws hidden under the basin.
Have fun
Martin
Right I'll have a closer look. I only need to lift it a few mm to be able to pull out the pedestal - and problem solved, perhaps.
 
dynamite.png
 
I've shifted a blockage with a wet rag in the overflow and a vacuum cleaner nozzle on the outlet before now. Doesn't work every time but enough to be worth a try before breaking out the sledgehammer
 
Thanks for the comments. Looks like I've got to cut it off then!
The problem is that they have put copper pipes in which make it impossible to reach the trap and unblock it, which needs doing. The pedestal is loose but can't get it past the bowl. I might have a look at it again before I saw the sink of the wall. Might be simpler to smash the pedestal and replace it with something nice and woody.
Have you got inline shut off valves? If not then it might be a chance to do two jobs at once. Cut the copper, sort out the trap, refit copper with inline valve
 

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