Quantcast

Jones & Shipman Drill Restoration

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

SkinnyB

Established Member
Joined
23 Jan 2014
Messages
135
Reaction score
2
Location
West Sussex
I have really been looking forward to getting around to cleaning this machine up. Had a bit of time so have made a start on it.

Follows on from this thread:
anyone-know-about-a-a-jones-shipman-drilling-machines-t115828.html

IMG_3391 by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Started by taking the motor off. Bit awkward as it is held by a bearing at the top as well as the motor base bolts and kind of all slots in together. Not really noticing this I undid the 4 motor mount bolts first and then looked upwards at the bearing cover above.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Gave it a little wiggle and whole motor dropped... (standing on a stool at the time) Luckily I didn't fall with the shock weight of it and didn't drop it either.

This is the stepped pulley attached to the motor. Seems that at some point someone may have used some pulley pullers and broke the casting.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

The bearing came off very easily so I guess they succeeded in the end. Time for the pulley to come off.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

This shaft!! Will it come off! Removed the three grub screws, filled and left overnight with penetrant. tried heating. Tried to wedged it off either side. Stumped on this one as ideally I would like to to get into that motor.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Another fix here. A couple of layers of MDF to mount the motor further back. I later found the motor adjuster had seized quite badly hence this fix.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

This part is to adjust the motor back and fourth. Couple of taps of the mallet and it popped out. Just very rusty.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Electronics

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Only this far through so far...

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

4 bolts and 2 alignment pins to adjust to undo this top part.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

One long shaft for the chuck.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Very well oiled this part. Looks new.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Tacking the base and the other cast parts.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

First I am going to pressure wash them and use some degreaser.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Starting to see some original paint work.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Removing the old paint.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Leaving too dry.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Can now see what those dimples were in the base. They are screws inserted into threads in the base. I presume for mounting work holding options. These screws act as bungs and are in place for when the machine was using coolant.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Hitting the parts with a wire wheel. I find the removing as much of the old paint chemically really get into the crevices where a wire wheel would not. This is also the area which is most likely thick with dirt and grease etc. I can then go in quickly with a small wire wheel on a Dremel to ready for painting.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Tacking the rusty coolant 'moat'

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

First of all I duck taped the underside of the drainage hole and then applied hot glue to seal the hole further.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Now I am going to fill with Evapo-rust.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Glad I left a container underneath just in case.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

A screw had been broken off so I used a cut off wheel to make a small slot and unscrewed it.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Starting to mask off the parts to be painted.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Back to the base. I used a drill to remove the glue and started to drain the moat.
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Much Better!

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Started on some paint work. Again I'm favouring the black and white look.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Brushed on Combi Colour.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Should get myself some fancier tape. Bled a little so cleaned up with spirits as it stayed soft under the tape.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Masked off the Moat ready for painting. I was going to leave this bare metal but then I got white paint in it so...

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

The drill came on this sturdy rusty base which I will use for now. Quickly went over the outside with a wire wheel.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

I want to use this drill a precision drilling drill. I got myself a cheap XY table to mount on top. Hopefully with a vice it should still give me some z height to work with.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Mounting location.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Got the base on the big drill press.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Tapped
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

One pesky screw would not budge from either side. Penetrant applied over a week and still no good. I drilled it out to 5mm (I tried tapping to an m6 bolt to it but stripped the head on that bolt too) taking my time to get it in the middle. I then got a larger drill and with it running slow speed rammed it into the top. The drill grabbed the screw and twisted it out the bottom of the base.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

I wasn't to sure if/how well this would work but I ground off the paint on the letters then clear coated. I like it. Could have been a little less heavy handed with the clear coat though...

Got the top mounted to the base too.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

I got an ultrasonic cleaner recently and put it to the test on these bolts. My method needs some work but I got good results.
5mins degreaser.
5mins Phosphoric acid (removes the rust)
5mins Soapy water
If there was still rust after the acid it would go in again, as I am polishing the bolts head it was only the threads I was interested in getting clean. Some of the stubborn parts I removed with a small wire brush, maybe longer in the cleaner it would have gotten them.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Polishing the Bolt heads. Is started with a 80g on the angle grinder. I had the intention of swapping to a finder grit but could I find any discs...

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Then to the polisher.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Could be better... Could be worse...
Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

These came out nice.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Shiny old bolts to start bolting things back together.

Jones and Shipman drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Thats where I am at so far and hoping to pick it up again soon.
Thanks for Reading.
 

AES

Established Member
Joined
18 Feb 2011
Messages
4,288
Reaction score
87
Location
Switzerland, near Basel
Blimey, WHAT a beastie!

Makes my "big" Rexon look like a toy. You've done a lovely job there Jamie, and assuming that you're "only" about 10 years old (!!) it should outlast you, your kids, and their kids too.

Great job Sir. =D>
 

SkinnyB

Established Member
Joined
23 Jan 2014
Messages
135
Reaction score
2
Location
West Sussex
Had a look at the Jacobs chuck today, I couldn't quite work out how to get it off to start with; presumed it was a taper fitting.

I opened the jaws of my vice so the shaft would fit through but not the chuck. A couple of gentle taps of the chuck against the vice the shaft popped out.

From the looks of it someone mush have tried to get this out before, there were some plier marks around the outside and some small wedged shaped indentations.

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

I then placed the chuck in the ultrasonic cleaner for about 20mins and it came out like this.
5 mins degreaser, 10 min phosphoric acid, 5 mins scale remover, rinsed throughly then sprayed in WD40.

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

I quick go over with a wire wheel and a few minutes on the polisher and its looking good.

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

The drill has this quirky little oiler thing. Unfortunately the two pieces of glass are broken. The seals are gone too but easily replaced. Not sure I will be able to find glass in both the correct diameter and length. We will have to see. I am going to clean it up anyway if I can't find anything perhaps a plastic or 3d printed option may be easier to source.

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Got almost all the other part cleaned up ready to be fitted. Some cast iron capping parts still need some paint.

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and Shipman Drill restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr
 

wallace

Established Member
Joined
13 Feb 2011
Messages
1,949
Reaction score
5
Location
county durham
Nice work. I've found the best tape to use is yellow frog tape. Weirdly the cheapest place to get it is B&Q. Its great for clean paint line and comes off so easy
 

SkinnyB

Established Member
Joined
23 Jan 2014
Messages
135
Reaction score
2
Location
West Sussex
marcros":3hk4zdd6 said:
Any idea on the age of the drill?
I have found a similar drill to this dated 1932. Im guessing that mine is around that age. Im finding that looking up Pollard branded drills brings up a lot more similar styles with later dates.

Trevanion":3hk4zdd6 said:
Not sure if it's any use to you Jamie but you can pick up drip-feed oilers from various places and I think they've stayed pretty much the same forever so I reckon it's just a case of finding the right size.

https://www.rdgtools.co.uk/acatalog/Drip_Feed_Oilers-1.html

You could possibly even butcher one for the glass and seals and keep the original one going.
Ahh Brill! Ill look into getting a replacement then, had no idea you could still get them. Cheers
 

SkinnyB

Established Member
Joined
23 Jan 2014
Messages
135
Reaction score
2
Location
West Sussex
Made some more progress this evening.

Mounted the small pulley on the lathe and dressed it with a wire wheel and some light sanding. I was hoping to get a high polish from this but the scratches and rust spots were very deep.

Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Putting the adjustable quill assembly back together. Had this apart so many times as a lot of parts have to be attached in the correct order.

Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

I am wanting to use an X Y table with this drill and a vice. I was hoping to get away with not raising the column but look as if I am going to need to raise it a fair bit. I need to make a block that goes in-between the column and base at some point.

Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Got the shaft of the lever polished up and the two Bakelite? End caps.
Jones and shipman restoration by jamie skinner, on Flickr

Next job will be to tackle the motor which I am having trouble with. The extended shaft just won't budge so going to need to come up with a plan for that.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,440
Reaction score
261
Location
Pembrokeshire
It's looking good! I like these older machines especially the ones with the clipped together flat belts that make that clacking noise as they go around.

SkinnyB":15dh59nr said:
Next job will be to tackle the motor which I am having trouble with. The extended shaft just won't budge so going to need to come up with a plan for that.
It's hard to say without being there in-person and looking at it closely but have you tried unthreading the end at all? It wouldn't be the first time I've seen something like that threaded onto the end of a motor spindle which may be why you have a few grub screws at the base of the spindle holding it in place.
 
Top