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Preparing timber components to size

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Orcamesh

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Hi

I know this is probably a bit of a daft question/comment, but if my planer/thicknesser has a maximum thicknessing capacity of 150mm and I want to produce two matching single piece sides (of a cabinet) which are 160mm wide then of course I am only able to pass them through the table saw/band saw and then hand plane them (both of them held together in a vice)?

I've done this on my project but there are discrepancies between the two pieces and it seems however I try to keep them together in the vice whilst hand planing the edges, they always seem to end up being very very slightly different (we are talking shavings but you can feel a difference with your fingers). The pieces straight off the table saw are also not exactly the same due to the piece moving very very slightly during pushing it through.

I didn't want to cut the side pieces in half along their length because they were perfectly sized for the job in hand so only needed minor amount removing off the width before hand planing. I didn't want to cut them in half to then thickness them in the P/T and to then rejoin them together again because I wanted them to look continuous as you look at the side of the cabinet, hence the single piece for each side.

and before you mention it, yes, I am aware that P/T's can be bought which have better max thicknessing capacity! :)

Does anyone use a special jig for hand planing boards to width so that several boards come out all exactly the same width? Any plans available? I have a shooting board but of course that is usually used for end grain, I wondered if there was an equivalent for planing with the grain? Or do you have any other advice?

Any help or tips would be appreciated.

ta
Steve
 

Steve Maskery

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If the difference is only palpable rather than visible, does it really matter? You can plane the front of the cabinet flush after glue-up.
There is no reason why you can't use a shooting board for edge-grain, if it is long enough.
Perhaps just persevering with a hand-plane is the answer, it's all good practice!
S
 

Orcamesh

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Steve Maskery":2mz1uand said:
If the difference is only palpable rather than visible, does it really matter? You can plane the front of the cabinet flush after glue-up.
There is no reason why you can't use a shooting board for edge-grain, if it is long enough.
Perhaps just persevering with a hand-plane is the answer, it's all good practice!
S
Aye, you're probably right Steve. I do know I need to practice my hand planing technique!

Whilst I agree with the above, the problem here was that I then had to drill accurate shelf position holes in these side pieces, and this is where the discrepancy came in such that because the two pieces were not identical when they were placed in my new pillar drill jig, the errors forced the holes to end up slightly out of position.

I will just have to individually craft the shelf supports now to make up for the errors where they are.

But next time, I definitely agree that my hand planing has to improve!

cheers
Steve
 

Jacob

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Do all your measurements from best face and edge (marked with face and edge marks) also only put best edge up to any fence on your pillar drill (or anything else)?
 

Steve Maskery

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That's good advice.
As for shelf holes, I always drill them by hand after assembly. I make a board with holes in on the drill press, mark one end as the datum and then use a cordless drill through that template, with the template sitting on the cabinet floor. That way all the holes are the same distance from the floor, regardless of anything else. It works for me and my shelves never rock! :)
S
 

Midnight

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I found the most reliable way (for me) to generate matched sets of stock was to build a long grain shooting board... nothing fancy about it... just 3 sheets of ply in a sandwich, top one's adjustable to allow varying widths of stock, centre has the stock rest on top of it and serves as a stop, lower one is the bed the plane rides on while shooting. shooting stock longer than the board is a bit of a farf, but it's doable with patience... better to make the board much longer than you think you'll need; there's always another project that needs longer stock...

speaking of which... I need to re-make this jig... it suffered while in storage...
 

Orcamesh

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Some good comments chaps, thanks. I have clearly made a pigs ear of this. Still, luckily it can be remedied. I shall definitely be doing this differently next time. Thanks for your help.
 
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