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Noise reduction, annoyed neighbour appeasement

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johnelliott

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Does anybody have any thoughts about this subject? I am moving to a new workshop (at last, got the keys yesterday) and although good in most other respects, it is quite close to a couple of houses.
I think my noisiest machines are the table routers. Currently these are open at the front, so I am going to box those in. The dust extractor can provide ventilation, but they are only on for 10 minutes or so at a time, anyway. Pretty soon I hope to replace them with a spindle moulder, which should be somewhat quieter.
Also, I expect to be doing quite a bit with MDF, which I know makes less noise (though a lot more dust!) when it is cut.
Any other thoughts? How do you guys keep your neighbours happy?
John
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi John

Congratulations o nthe new shop, must be an exciting time. :)

I attacked the sound poroblem with a chipboard wall infort of existing one and covered this with green insulation tiles that are meant to go under laminate floor - they are rated for sound and heat insulation.

A picture is in the gallery here:
https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/gallery/det ... age_id=168

I have started up my dust extractor, table saw and planer and went outside to check (very subjective) and I could only hear a slight hum if I stood right next to shop wall and listened hard. Clearly machining operations, especially with brushed motors, will be much louder but I have had no complaints in the 6 months I've been there even though I have been round neighbours and asked if noise is a problem.

Good luck

Tony
 

Pete W

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Assuming you're in line with planning permissions for the premises, a reasonable amount of noise shouldn't be a problem. In my opinion, the best thing would be to introduce yourself to the nearest neighbours and explain what you'll be up to.

Tell them you'll be taking steps to reduce the noise, but some will be inevitable. I think most people are reasonable and as long as you don't run the screaming demons early in the morning or late at night, you shouldn't have a problem.

I think noise is something the woodworking industry as a whole doesn't take seriously enough, particularly since the growth of the hobby market in the last few years. The magazines could (and should) make noise a major issue in reviews.
 

Adam

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I agree, I like to see noise figures quoted for most machines - my Mafell router was the first I bought, and it's only since using a few others I have realised just how smooth and quiet it is - this was complete luck.

When buying other machines now - although very subjective, I find noise is a good indicators of the quality of machining on the shafts that pass through bearings, any surface undulations, or bent shafts definatly cause a louder noise to be produced.

Adam
 

johnelliott

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Tony":37cfegpx said:
no complaints in the 6 months I've been there even though I have been round neighbours and asked if noise is a problem.
Treating neighbours as if they matter is a big part of it, and I shall be getting round all my new ones and telling them what I intend to do to keep noise below the annoyance level. Hopefully I will make a good enough impression that they will keep an eye on my place and ring the BIB if they hear anyone breaking in.
Adam's point about the quality of the equipment is a good one, too. It's no surprise to me that my noisiest stuff is also the cheapest (B&Q 1/2" routers).
John
 

Steve Maskery

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When I built my workshop about 10 years ago, I made my own doors. They are normal braced-frame and clad doors, and I filled them with glass wool and covered it in with MDF on the inside. The glass windows are double glazed. The personal door at the back is made similarly. I didn't clad the walls or floor, but I wish I had. Concrete is hard to stand on all day, and in an argument between the floor and anything else, the floor always wins.
The workshop (tandem garage) also joins onto next-doors kitched, which is also and extension. It means we are no longer technically detached. But I got then in on the plans at architect stage, we wanted access to their path for scaffolding etc, and we had no problems. I have a cavity wall, they have a cavity wall and there is a cavity between the two walls. I do check every now and again that they are not disturbed, and I don't do anything too antisocial outside normal working hours, and never on a Sunday.
So far I've not upset anyone.
Personally I find the noise of someone mowing the lawn or playing the hifi like a PA system or screaming kids, all on a Sunday afternoon (and a vicar the culprit!) far more annoying. Snooze time!
Cheers
Steve
 

ike

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Don't rely on unending goodwill from neighbours. I'd go for insulation and peace of mind. Plus you can keep it warm in the winter without sending the electric meter into a frenzy.

I built my workshop 4" block rendered to 4 courses then 2x4 framed and trussed roof. Soundproofed with 4"cavity wool and 18mm chipboard lining Roof the same but with 6mm MDF lining. Also secondary DG units (salvaged) - you could still DG reasonably cheaply with acrylic sheet but brittle when that long timber you're about to feed through the saw whacks it. I also added a square mesh grille on the inside of the DG for safety and security.
 

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