Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Newbie Alert.

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

disco_monkey79

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2009
Messages
584
Reaction score
14
I've only done one (a few years ago now), but I understand the content varies. Mine was in Hertfordshire, and we had the morning in the classroom. In the afternoon, we went out one-on-one with an advanced driving instructor. It was actually really good.

Anywho - welcome!
 

XH558

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
9
Location
Sawbridgeworth
I did my motorcycle advanced riding course.....best money ever spent....
the test was done by a Police motorcyce instructor...the main test was urban but then we had to do an open road ride....
his words were "if u can keep up safely u've passed".....it was set in the Yorkshire dales....he was riding a Police Beemer....
those stone wall look awfuly solid....hahaha.....
what a great bloke.....
now 72, still riding.......happy days.....

oh, welcome to the mad place, very informative and so many interesting views n people....
If you can keep up you've passed. If you stack it you will have failed.............. Sounds about right. I've also done my RoSPA car test and have tutored people to the correct standard. 5 Gold Awards so far. Open Roads (Rural roads) are a blast. Especially the narrow lanes................
 

Dibs-h

Established Member
Joined
23 Jul 2007
Messages
4,213
Reaction score
4
Location
West Yorkshire
Hi Nick,

Welcome to the forum.

On the subject of SAC's - I did one about 5yrs ago. I had recently passed my bike test (hadn't bought a bike tho) but remember one of the SAC folk saying that the speed limit was a target and not a minimum - fair enough & made sense.

But I asked him if he could explain why on a bike Mod 2 test - if you rode at say 5 mph less than any speed limit, you got failed for "failing to make progress", i.e. on a Mod 2, you were expected to ride literally at the speed limit (weather and all other things permitting).

I did confirm that at the test centers when doing my Mod 1 tests as I thought the bike instructors were making it up.

The SAC chap didn't know what to say. LOL

Dibs
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,312
Reaction score
237
Location
Pershore, Worcester
I too got marked down on my driving test many years ago for not going fast enough by about 5mph.

I don't mind getting done for speeding. It's a fair cop. Put the average speed cameras on all the motorways as I find they work great at stopping people sitting on my bumper and driving better in general. It's also a lot safer if everyone is rocking along doing the same speed.

On the occasions when I've just stuck my cruise on at 65 and wafted home I find I'm way less stressed than if I'm trying to do... Other numbers.. and you keep coming up behind berks in the middle lane for no reason doing 50.

What annoys me about getting done for speeding is that it's easy to catch people doing it, so lots of people get done for it. Conversely people playing on their phones which I see allllll the time is much harder to catch and so less people get caught despite being, I believe, much more dangerous on the road than me doing 72 on a bit of motorway that's been reduced to 60 to help clean up the air.
 

billw

The Tattooed One
UKW Supporter
Joined
26 Apr 2009
Messages
804
Reaction score
212
Location
Sutton Coldfield, UK
The faster you drive the more you pay attention. It's the people who are too nervous to drive on motorways but still do so in the middle lane at 60 that should get the points.
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,312
Reaction score
237
Location
Pershore, Worcester
The faster you drive the more you pay attention. It's the people who are too nervous to drive on motorways but still do so in the middle lane at 60 that should get the points.
Were this blanket statement in any way accurate there would be a lot less hot hatches in crumpled wrecks and a lot less people dead as a result.

As I said earlier, there are more issues on the road that I think cause danger for others that barely get caught or punished at all. There are plenty of people that don't feel nervous on the motorway at all but don't know how to drive on one either. Be that tailgating, incorrect lane usage, playing on the phone, brake testing, insane weaving, even racing.
 

billw

The Tattooed One
UKW Supporter
Joined
26 Apr 2009
Messages
804
Reaction score
212
Location
Sutton Coldfield, UK
Were this blanket statement in any way accurate there would be a lot less hot hatches in crumpled wrecks and a lot less people dead as a result.

As I said earlier, there are more issues on the road that I think cause danger for others that barely get caught or punished at all. There are plenty of people that don't feel nervous on the motorway at all but don't know how to drive on one either. Be that tailgating, incorrect lane usage, playing on the phone, brake testing, insane weaving, even racing.

Yes it was a flippant answer, but speed isn't the only issue on the roads and I don't even think it's the foremost problem but obviously it's very easy to measure and fine people for.
 

Andy Kev.

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
20 Aug 2013
Messages
1,307
Reaction score
72
Location
Germany
Yes it was a flippant answer, but speed isn't the only issue on the roads and I don't even think it's the foremost problem but obviously it's very easy to measure and fine people for.
IMO speed is OK if the conditions allow it. For instance a more or less empty motorway could have a relatively high speed limit. In the rush hour, it could be optimal to have the limit at less than 70.

I remember reading some years ago that there should always be at least a two second gap between you and the car in front of you, irrespective of what speed you are both travelling at. It's easy enough to count two seconds while using a marker e.g. a display gantry.

The problem with speed is where it limits your options to act safely in the event of the unexpected.
 

Nigel Burden

Established Member
Joined
23 Oct 2018
Messages
366
Reaction score
70
Location
Dorset
Ok, cat among the pigeons time.

Speed doesn't kill. Bad driving does.

The majority of British drivers drive too close therefore restricting their vision, causing them to drive in a reactionary manner. Also many drivers seem to be unable to assess a SAFE speed thinking that if they stick to the posted limit they'll be safe, which is utter rubbish.

I don't have the latest statistics, but in his 2016 book "How not to crash" Reg Local, ex traffic officer and ex Police driving instructor lists causal factors in accidents in declining order. This book lists the most common causes of accidents according to the DFTs statistics for 2014. The book is 290 pages long and is split into nine different categories.
Driver/Rider error 72% of all accident is the main contributory factor of all accidents, and in that category 42% failed to look properly being the main cause.

Down here in Dorset the course is called a Driver Awareness Course which covers other minor offences, and is delivered in a very non judgemental way. The course was delivered by a civilian police driving instructor and a traffic officer. We were told that they weren't interested in what offence that was committed, but whatever it was, it was way down the low end in relation to seriousness, otherwise we wouldn't be there.

Nigel.

Retired ADI (Approved Driving Instructor)
Ex Qualified IAM Observer
 

Nigel Burden

Established Member
Joined
23 Oct 2018
Messages
366
Reaction score
70
Location
Dorset
By the way. Welcome to the forum Nick

Nigel.

Retired ADI and fellow wood mangler.
 

Horsee1

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2015
Messages
52
Reaction score
2
Location
London
Welcome.

To continue on the tangent;
I’ve just completed a speed awareness course online and found it to be pretty good. Fairly engaging and much better than taking the points.

It was 2.5 hours long and no forced group interactions. Did find it quite weird seeing a load of strangers in webcams.
I hadn’t realised that national speed limit for vans on country roads is 50, not 60 as it is for cars so I did learn something.
 
Last edited:

XH558

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
9
Location
Sawbridgeworth
Welcome.

To continue on the tangent;
I’ve just completed a speed awareness course online and found it to be pretty good. Fairly engaging and much better than taking the points.

It was 2.5 hours long and no forced group interactions. Did find it quite weird seeing a load of strangers in webcams.
I hadn’t realised that national speed limit for vans on country roads is 50, not 60 as it is for cars so I did learn something.
Thank you for the welcome. The course increases in length by 15 minutes in January. It's a really good course. I enjoy delivering it. Most peoples concept of speed limits is 'interesting'................
 

XH558

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
9
Location
Sawbridgeworth
Ok, cat among the pigeons time.

Speed doesn't kill. Bad driving does.

The majority of British drivers drive too close therefore restricting their vision, causing them to drive in a reactionary manner. Also many drivers seem to be unable to assess a SAFE speed thinking that if they stick to the posted limit they'll be safe, which is utter rubbish.

I don't have the latest statistics, but in his 2016 book "How not to crash" Reg Local, ex traffic officer and ex Police driving instructor lists causal factors in accidents in declining order. This book lists the most common causes of accidents according to the DFTs statistics for 2014. The book is 290 pages long and is split into nine different categories.
Driver/Rider error 72% of all accident is the main contributory factor of all accidents, and in that category 42% failed to look properly being the main cause.

Down here in Dorset the course is called a Driver Awareness Course which covers other minor offences, and is delivered in a very non judgemental way. The course was delivered by a civilian police driving instructor and a traffic officer. We were told that they weren't interested in what offence that was committed, but whatever it was, it was way down the low end in relation to seriousness, otherwise we wouldn't be there.

Nigel.

Retired ADI (Approved Driving Instructor)
Ex Qualified IAM Observer
Dorset do not subscribe to the National Model.........

Impact is what actually kills.coming abruptly and often violently to a halt.

93% of collisions are down to Driver/rider error.
 

Horsee1

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2015
Messages
52
Reaction score
2
Location
London
Thank you for the welcome. The course increases in length by 15 minutes in January. It's a really good course. I enjoy delivering it. Most peoples concept of speed limits is 'interesting'................
I can imagine.

It’s certainly a good chance to reflect on ones own driving habits and I didn’t find the tone patronising at all so good work all!
 

AJS2018

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2018
Messages
19
Reaction score
3
Location
North Yorkshire
I did a speed awareness course in London about 8 years ago with the sole intention of avoiding 3 points on my license. At the very end of the session and as we stood up to leave, the guy who was running it said “now don’t forget to inform your insurance company you have been on this course”. Of course I didn’t and have never discovered if you should do this, I’ve heard people say that your insurance can be voided if you don’t. I’m interested if anyone else has had this experienc.
 

Padster

Established Member
Joined
16 Jan 2020
Messages
31
Reaction score
7
Location
Leicester
Welcome - and I have done a SAC a while back - I have to say my experience with the instructor I had was he like you said tried to make it fun to deliver, makes a difference to being lectured and as I regularly present in my day job is something I always try and include.
 

XH558

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
9
Location
Sawbridgeworth
DBT.

Getting caught. Quite agree. The difference is, before cameras, all one needed to do was keep an eye on the rear view mirror. It was easy to read the word police, written in 'mirror writing"!

John
ECILOP.............
 

XH558

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
9
Location
Sawbridgeworth
I did a speed awareness course in London about 8 years ago with the sole intention of avoiding 3 points on my license. At the very end of the session and as we stood up to leave, the guy who was running it said “now don’t forget to inform your insurance company you have been on this course”. Of course I didn’t and have never discovered if you should do this, I’ve heard people say that your insurance can be voided if you don’t. I’m interested if anyone else has had this experienc.
The guidance I give is to go home and READ THE SMALL PRINT. That is it as we are not specialists in that field.

WITHOUT PREJUDICE

If you are worried then call your insurance company. 'Asking for a friend insured with you', is a common opening line............
If the small print requires you to declare any courses and you fail to disclose, then as your material facts have changed you might find yourself uninsured. Thats 6 points and £200 fine. Oh they impound your vehicle too.
Some insurers increase your premium but hell, you have just completed an approved training course to make you a bit safer so ask for a discount.

When you change insurers, you are obliged to declare.
Hope that helps.
 
Top