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Making Imperial size floorboards

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Anonymous

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Hi,

I need to replace some 7/8" thick tongue and groove floorboards in my Victorian hovel, I'm an ancient electrician so know how to use most tools - what economical tools should I buy to make these boards - presumably a planer/thicknesser and router set-up would suffice but having little experience of these I need advice before buying. Alternatively does anyone know someone in East Yorkshire who could make them for a reasonable price?
 

JFC

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You should be able to get 7/8 from stock . If not most timber yards will mill it up for you cheaper than the cost of a planer/thicknesser . to tounge and groove it all you need is a router and a rebate cutter . if its not a run of boards and just one here and there then you wont need to cut the bottom half of the groove as you wont be able to get the board in . But then you probably knew that . :D
 

ProShop

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there's a couple of timber yards around here that stock the new & old size (7/8ths). So they must be others about the country. Try the usual YP.

Hope this helps
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks George_N, JFC, FelderMan, I didn't think true 7/8" planed would still be available, it'll be great if I can source some. I have searched a number of architectural salvage yards but so far no joy, I think with all the house renovation programmes on telly nowadays items like floorboards don't last very long in these yards but I'll keep looking nevertheless.

>>to tounge and groove it all you need is a router and a rebate cutter . if its not a run of boards and just one here and there then you wont need to cut the bottom half of the groove as you wont be able to get the board in . But then you probably knew that>>
A rebate cutter! Never thought of that, I was looking at a tongue and groove cutter, but that's why I asked the question, if you guys don't know no one does!
Actually I'm taking up the whole floor including the 5x3 joists some of which need replacing because of rot, so slotting new T&G boards together wouldn't be a problem, however I could still miss of the bottom half of the groove if I have to machine them myself, it'll be a damn sight easier.
Thanks again for the advice guys I appreciate it, cheers.
Btw, what in your opinion is the best buy non-pro router on the market?
 

Scrit

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Hi Geoff

When you're putting in floor boards make sure that you either have a pair (or more) of flooring cramps or at least some home-made equivalents (double wedges) to get the joints nice and tight before nailing. Irwin Record still make these (#153), but they are horrendously expensive at about £150 a pop - making hire or home-made a must. Also be wary of old s/h boards. Pitch pine in particular becomes very hard and brittle with age and can crack when you attempt to lift it or saw it. Plain boards are easier to lay/repair if not as draught-proof, so the double rebate idea works well for me, too. If buying salvage you can tell the age of the board to an extent by the finish - older boards will have a rough (band or sometimes circular sawn) back and a planed face (match boarding 4-sided planer/moulders came in in a big way the early 20th century). As for new boards 1 in R/S (rough sawn) should translate to 7/8in finished (i.e. 1in nominal).

Are you intending to replace the nails with the same pattern - you'll probably need cut clasps - which I've never seen in B&Q alkthough many builders merchants stock them.

Scrit
 

ProShop

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SCRIT WROTE:

you'll probably need cut clasps
Aaahhh now theres a blast from the past, there's a few out there with remnants of my skin on :D :D :D :D.

Some very good tips there Scrit. :)
Just to add another couple if your using old pine boards as Scrit says the pitch pine is extremely brittle even if you use nails. Drill an appropriate sized pilot hole first. (screws work well with these old boards. Pitch pine when cut or machined has imo a wonderful smell.
And if you haven't got any cramps or double wedges you could try using cargo straps (not as good as cramps) but better than nothing.

I'm sure you used to be able to hire some from specialist hire firms. worth checking out.

Hope this helps
 

Alf

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Scrit":238jhaja said:
Are you intending to replace the nails with the same pattern - you'll probably need cut clasps - which I've never seen in B&Q alkthough many builders merchants stock them.
Perhaps surprisingly, so do Focus. I thought B&Q did too, but I don't get in there much.

Cheers, Alf
 

Scrit

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FelderMan":3uxzqdjs said:
Drill an appropriate sized pilot hole first.
Thanks for picking that up John, forgot to mention it! :oops: I agree with you about the smell, marvellous! Some of the pitch pine flooring I've had in the past started as a dirty, sooty, black colour but once sanded had the most delightful pinkish hue, although with age that floor is now a mellow golden brown.

The other cramping device which might work is the Bowrench used by deck builders. Although the beauty of the Record cramps is that they will exert a huge amount of pressure and are self locking.

Alf

Focus :shock:

Scrit
 

Scrit

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Alf":cgf82nj5 said:
Don't look at me; the wrinklies have a touching fondness for the place. ](*,)
Who're you calling a wrinkly :wink:

Scrit
 

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