Quantcast

Lubricate rope to fit it through a tight hole?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
I'm making a rope bridge for the children's climbing frames, and the base consists of pieces of 3x2 with some 25mm rope through it. I've just cut the 25mm holes, and I'm struggling to get the rope though as it's a really tight fit. Should I try something to lubricate the rope, and if so, what should I try (washing up liquid, WD40, motor oil)?

Thanks
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,023
Reaction score
464
Location
Bristol
[disclaimer - I've not done this!]

It will depend on whether your rope is made of something natural (which would absorb water) - but I don't think old motor oil would be very nice on the children's hands!

Assuming you can't enlarge the holes a bit (coarse sandpaper round a bit of piping...) I would try just wetting the rope - it will presumably get rained on in the garden - and see if that lets you stretch it so it goes a bit thinner.
 

wabbitpoo

Established Member
Joined
21 Aug 2008
Messages
332
Reaction score
0
Soap/Fairy Liquid?*





*Other makes of washing up liquid are available
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
AndyT":3lj4rmk5 said:
It will depend on whether your rope is made of something natural (which would absorb water) - but I don't think old motor oil would be very nice on the children's hands!
It's man made rope. Motor oil wouldn't be nice, I'll try and avoid that (although this goes through wood under their feet, so won't be touched).

Assuming you can't enlarge the holes a bit (coarse sandpaper round a bit of piping...)
I probably could do that (homer)
wabbitpoo":3lj4rmk5 said:
Soap/Fairy Liquid?*
Going to have a quick go now.
 

xy mosian

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2009
Messages
2,805
Reaction score
2
Location
West Yorkshire
I don't know how you are attempting to get the rope through the hole. But if you are pushing it, try pulling. This will reduce the diameter slightly whereas pushing will enlarge it. Put something thin, but strong, through the hole attach it to the end of the rope and pull. Think builders nylon twine through the hole wrapped tightly around the rope end. It may not work, but it may save making a mess, although that can be fun.
xy
 

Eric The Viking

Established Member
Joined
19 Jan 2010
Messages
6,595
Reaction score
55
Location
Bristle, CUBA (the County that Used to Be Avon)
Talcum powder. Keep it dry, too.

If you can, wrap some insulating tape tightly round the rope for a couple of inches (do it a several inches back from the end), then cut the rope across the middle of the insulating tape.

That should allow it to go through, but TBH 25mm rope through a 25mm hole is tight, and you may not compress it enough.

A quick and dirty (and smelly) way to seal it is to pass a lighted match over the end, get it well alight, then dip the end quickly into cold water, but this will spread the end too.

Polypropylene and Nylon both expand slightly with water, too.
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
Thanks all for the advice.
xy mosian":tsz0y7x3 said:
I don't know how you are attempting to get the rope through the hole. But if you are pushing it, try pulling. This will reduce the diameter slightly whereas pushing will enlarge it. Put something thin, but strong, through the hole attach it to the end of the rope and pull.
I don't have anything suitable, and I expect tying the thin bit to the end would be a challenge.

I've got one bit through with effort and fairy, using a twisting motion. I'm not sure the fairy did much. I wouldn't be able to do that for the rest anyway, as the twisting would mean not just twisting the rope but all the wood that's already attached.

I tried sanding the inside of another with 22mm copper and rough paper. Sanded for a bit, tried, then repeated a lot. Eventually made it work, but it was too much effort.

Decided to re-drill the holes with a 28mm flat bit. Not ideal when the holes are already drilled, but done now. The rope is still a squeeze, so I'll do some light sanding on each. Cup of tea first though :)

Eric The Viking":tsz0y7x3 said:
Talcum powder. Keep it dry, too.
That sounds like an excellent idea, but I don't have talc.

adidat":tsz0y7x3 said:
lard? unless your veggeys!
Not veggies but don't have that either :)

Anyway, should be sorted now. I'll try and finish it in the morning and post a piccie :)
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,023
Reaction score
464
Location
Bristol
Would it help to drip some candle wax onto the rope at the same time as you twist it together?

Also, if you have not got a tidy end, melt the fibres together over a flame, then roll them together so they melt into a lump (don't use your fingers to do the rolling).
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
AndyT":32hnuvpi said:
Also, if you have not got a tidy end, melt the fibres together over a flame, then roll them together so they melt into a lump
All ends were cut with a hot knife, so all tidy, but where cut the edge is stiff and not circular.

Anyway, all done now, save for one piece of wood that I'm saving as a template for the holes in the climbing frame. Wasn't a problem once the holes were 28mm and sanded.

So, 28mm holes in 42mm timber #-o I hope it's stronger than it sounds.
 

parvum

Established Member
Joined
15 Mar 2009
Messages
100
Reaction score
0
Location
South Bucks
Hi ,If Its laid rope, ie three strands twisted together, try twisting the rope in the direction of the lay as you push it through the hole. This should reduce its diameter a little and exercise your wrist

regards Paul.
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
parvum":127jr6uk said:
Hi ,If Its laid rope, ie three strands twisted together, try twisting the rope in the direction of the lay as you push it through the hole. This should reduce its diameter a little and exercise your wrist
Thanks, I did, and then twist in the opposite direction when it gets to the other side (so you're effectively wringing it).


Anyway, one (small) rope bride:



to attach two towers:



And so to the next question. Now that the rope for the bridge has been tied, how can I best tighten it? As soon as the kids stand on it, it will sag more than I'm wanting. So I was thinking of making some wooden wedges to push the knots away from the joist:



Does that sound like a plan, or can you suggest an alternative?


Thanks
 

Noggsy

Established Member
Joined
28 Dec 2011
Messages
590
Reaction score
8
Location
Runcorn
Looks good and has made me think about making something similar for my niece. To tighten, perhaps loop some strong cord (maybe a couple of loops of paracord) around either knot and then use some form of twisting to pull the knots together. That way, you could continue to tighten them in the future if needed. I can see the sense in wedges, but you would be limited by how long you could make them and they might fray the rope as you knocked them in further.
 

JakeS

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2011
Messages
947
Reaction score
0
Location
Grantham
Triggaaar":1l1bbml5 said:
And so to the next question. Now that the rope for the bridge has been tied, how can I best tighten it?
I'm afraid my first thought was "move the towers further apart"... !




Perhaps you could slot a U-shaped batten in between the wooden platform and the straight pull of rope, the bridge side of the knot? Moving that straight bit down would also have the effect of reducing the slack on the bridge, after all, and a U-shaped piece would be less prone than wedges to falling out through movement in the future.
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
Noggsy":2w6d4emm said:
Looks good and has made me think about making something similar for my niece.
Thanks.
To tighten, perhaps loop some strong cord (maybe a couple of loops of paracord) around either knot and then use some form of twisting to pull the knots together. That way, you could continue to tighten them in the future if needed.
I'm not sure what paracord is. What sort of thickness are you thinking? Sounds like an option, thanks.
I can see the sense in wedges, but you would be limited by how long you could make them and they might fray the rope as you knocked them in further.
I don't think they need to be long, and I could prevent fraying just by placing something between the rope and wood.

JakeS":2w6d4emm said:
I'm afraid my first thought was "move the towers further apart"... !
Fortunately for us all, your first thought wasn't your last :)

Perhaps you could slot a U-shaped batten in between the wooden platform and the straight pull of rope, the bridge side of the knot?
That was my first thought. I might be being naive, but I don't want all the weight the bridge bares to be on the timber closest to the bridge. I made the hole in that piece of timber a little lower than the hole in the timber closest the not, and I'm hoping that piece of timber takes some of the weight. If I were to stretch that short section of rope I think all the weight would go on the first piece of timber, which wasn't designed to support weight.
 

Noggsy

Established Member
Joined
28 Dec 2011
Messages
590
Reaction score
8
Location
Runcorn
Paracord = parachute cord. Beloved of the army and extremely high size to strength ratio. It's a few mil thick. The length I was meaning on the wedges was that if they are short (as defined by the space they have to fit into) then you won't be able to keep adjusting them if the rope gets slacker in the future.
 

RogerM

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2006
Messages
1,274
Reaction score
2
Location
Devon
Triggaaar":t6fq33w3 said:
As soon as the kids stand on it, it will sag more than I'm wanting. So I was thinking of making some wooden wedges to push the knots away from the joist:
Looks like a fun piece of kit. If you tension the ropes, what's to stop the tension pulling the two towers together, or for them simply to rack? Can't help feeling that a diagonal brace might not come amiss to prevent racking. If you want that rope walk-way to be really tight those towers will need to be seriously rigid. Maybe a short length of timber connecting them together at the sides, and at the same height (or similar) to the the rope walk to prevent the towers moving inwards? Certainly using a wedge under the knot should provide the tension you want.
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
RogerM":3rkm5qoe said:
If you tension the ropes, what's to stop the tension pulling the two towers together, or for them simply to rack?
I think I have to fit something between the two towers to stop them coming together regardless whether I make the bridge tight or not, but simply to allow for kids to be jumping up and down on the bridge. The 4 legs of each tower are screwed into concrete, but I still think I should fit something between them. I was going to wait until it's nearly finished so I can choose a subtle place to put the support - maybe at the back of the bridge, just out of sight, or at the very top of the main posts.

Can't help feeling that a diagonal brace might not come amiss to prevent racking.
As I was building I wondered about diagonal bracing for support. Strangely the frames available on the market don't have such diagonal support. Again I decided to see how rigid it was once built, and then look for where I could add support. Front to back both towers have diagonal pieces for the roof. Side to side both will have some sort of ladder, but I hadn't planned to fix those to the ground.

If you want that rope walk-way to be really tight those towers will need to be seriously rigid.
I don't want it to be crazy tight, I want it to have the same look as it does now (which it won't once the kids have walked on it). The problem was that you can't tie a knot in that rope and have the not tight against the wooden support.
Maybe a short length of timber connecting them together at the sides, and at the same height (or similar) to the the rope walk to prevent the towers moving inwards?
Ah yes, that's what I was thinking. Hopefully one piece of timber will do.

Today's job - do the roof.
 

toolsntat

Yep, I collect tools and tat
Joined
8 Dec 2007
Messages
1,720
Reaction score
134
Location
Leicestershire England
Hi there , great looking project but a couple of things stand out in your design for me that you may want to consider looking at.

The first is the brick wall corner of that planter next to the steps.
The other is the hand ropes on the walkway being held by the pipe clips. Would they pull out if being swung on?
Also have you fastened the walkway planks to the rope to stop them closing up?

Hope I'm not being alarmist but young ones seem to have a habit of testing things too the point of destruction and I would hate something to happen and have not mentioned it :wink:

Cheers
Andy
 

Triggaaar

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2009
Messages
443
Reaction score
0
Location
Brighton
toolsntat":1uau3ej4 said:
Hi there , great looking project
Thanks, my skills are very basic.

a couple of things stand out in your design for me that you may want to consider looking at.

The first is the brick wall corner of that planter next to the steps.
I'm aware of the nasty brick wall. It can't really go anywhere, so the plan is to cope it with this safety matting: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Swing-Slide-P ... 1e6e1f39f2

The other is the hand ropes on the walkway being held by the pipe clips. Would they pull out if being swung on?
I'm hoping they're enough, the clips hold it reasonably and then there's a screw through the middle of the clip and through the rope.

Also have you fastened the walkway planks to the rope to stop them closing up?
Not yet, but that's in hand. I've pre-drilled holes in the bottom of the planks so I can screw them into the rope. I won't do it until the rope tightening if finish though. I've got some cricket netting to go between the hand ropes and the planks. I'll tie it to the hand rope, then either staple it to the planks.

Hope I'm not being alarmist but young ones seem to have a habit of testing things too the point of destruction
They do, all advice appreciated, thanks. At the bottom of the climbing frames I'm putting rubber chippings. The planks that go around the bottom of the frame will probably have thick grey pipe insulation put on the top for when kids fall on them. One base will be a sandpit (base with slide), the other will be a play house type thing (so that one won't need the pipe insulation.
 
Top