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LED lighting for workshop

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shed9

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I'm in the middle of a new workshop build, this is relatively small building of 8'x16' with a stud framework (now up) and will be insulated and clad in corrugated sheet metal. I already have a much larger building and will be building another large building after this current one. The reason for listing the number of buildings is that I'm going to fit LED lighting into this current build and was going to get the costs down by buying bulk T8 tubes for the two new builds and possibly the existing one as well. Not a major saving but economies of scale and all that. I'm looking at 30+ 4ft and 16+ 8ft tubes so a fair amount and if I can identify a standard throughout that makes economic and consistent usability sense.

My question is this....

Can anyone recommend which tube temperatures are a good choice for a workshop? The typical options in T8 LED tubes are 3000k (Warm), 4000k (Cool) and 6500k (Daylight). What are people using and would they use them again or switch. Any advice appreciated.
 

peterw3035

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I'm in the middle of a new workshop build, this is relatively small building of 8'x16' with a stud framework (now up) and will be insulated and clad in corrugated sheet metal. I already have a much larger building and will be building another large building after this current one. The reason for listing the number of buildings is that I'm going to fit LED lighting into this current build and was going to get the costs down by buying bulk T8 tubes for the two new builds and possibly the existing one as well. Not a major saving but economies of scale and all that. I'm looking at 30+ 4ft and 16+ 8ft tubes so a fair amount and if I can identify a standard throughout that makes economic and consistent usability sense.

My question is this....

Can anyone recommend which tube temperatures are a good choice for a workshop? The typical options in T8 LED tubes are 3000k (Warm), 4000k (Cool) and 6500k (Daylight). What are people using and would they use them again or switch. Any advice appreciated.
Good question shed9, I'll be interested to hear the responses for my own build. Thks
 

LambCrafter

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I'm in the middle of a new workshop build, this is relatively small building of 8'x16' with a stud framework (now up) and will be insulated and clad in corrugated sheet metal. I already have a much larger building and will be building another large building after this current one. The reason for listing the number of buildings is that I'm going to fit LED lighting into this current build and was going to get the costs down by buying bulk T8 tubes for the two new builds and possibly the existing one as well. Not a major saving but economies of scale and all that. I'm looking at 30+ 4ft and 16+ 8ft tubes so a fair amount and if I can identify a standard throughout that makes economic and consistent usability sense.

My question is this....

Can anyone recommend which tube temperatures are a good choice for a workshop? The typical options in T8 LED tubes are 3000k (Warm), 4000k (Cool) and 6500k (Daylight). What are people using and would they use them again or switch. Any advice appreciated.
I’ve just fitted 4 of these tubes into existing fittings in my single garage: 5ft 24w LED Fluorescent Tube - Daylight

I’m pleased with the 6500K light. The tubes come with a starter to replace the ‘standard’ one (which I tested and they worked) but I rewired the fitting to power the tube directly and added a switch to each batten unit so they can be individually switch on and off. Didn’t see the point of having to have all the tubes on all the time if all I’m doing is at one end the garage.
 

shed9

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I’ve just fitted 4 of these tubes into existing fittings in my single garage: 5ft 24w LED Fluorescent Tube - Daylight

I’m pleased with the 6500K light. The tubes come with a starter to replace the ‘standard’ one (which I tested and they worked) but I rewired the fitting to power the tube directly and added a switch to each batten unit so they can be individually switch on and off. Didn’t see the point of having to have all the tubes on all the time if all I’m doing is at one end the garage.
Thanks for that info. I've read in a few places that 5000k is optimal for woodworking but not actual found anyone who has reported that this works in practice. I'm erring towards the 6500k like yourself but a little concerned about this being at the far end of the blue spectrum. Can I ask if you have natural light coming into your garage, i.e. do you depend totally on the LED tubes for lighting?
 

Droogs

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I have 4K for general lighting in the ceiling and have a couple of 6 1/2K where i do marquetry at the bench or the scroll saw and also in the spray booth for decent colour matching finishes. i have no natural light as I am in a building inside a building
 

Ollie78

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Just bought a bunch of the led battens. Ip 65 no separate tube. They are 6400k and perfect for actually seeing what you are doing.
They are v tac waterproof ones, seem good so far.


Ollie
 

shed9

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You want more than just an LED tube as it can get broken. I've installed 6 of these in my 10 x 5 m workshop/garage. They are excellent. Osram LEDVANCE Damp Proof IP65, 5ft / L1500, 55W, 6500K, 6400lm (novelenergylighting.com)

Colin
I have the housings / fittings already. Not sure what you mean by more than just an LED tube? How else would you install T8 tubes for lighting?

Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the input but I'm confused as to the suggestion of tubes only???
 

shed9

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Just bought a bunch of the led battens. Ip 65 no separate tube. They are 6400k and perfect for actually seeing what you are doing.
They are v tac waterproof ones, seem good so far.


Ollie
Another vote for the 6500k range then, thanks for that.
 

shed9

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I have 4K for general lighting in the ceiling and have a couple of 6 1/2K where i do marquetry at the bench or the scroll saw and also in the spray booth for decent colour matching finishes. i have no natural light as I am in a building inside a building
I would have thought the blue element of 6500k would affect colour rendition, which is one of my concerns. I appreciate the Colour Rendering Index impacts that as well but I'm surprised to hear 6500k is better than lower down the scale. Good to know.
 

Droogs

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It may just be my preferance due to having a red/green perception issue. But do feel it gives me a better feel for how things are going. But no one has ever complained of a colour mismatch on finished pieces. just try to get as high a CRI Index number on the bulbs as poss.
 

Inspector

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I bought 6,000K baton LED fixtures for my shop when it was built in late 2016. I think the light is great and I have a fair number of windows on three sides except from south so have good natural light during the day. The light seems the same from both to me. The only time I notice any blueish is from the reflection on the snow at night compared to the reflected light from the other house lights.

Pete
 

Redbeard

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Another vote for the 6500K here, I've been replacing the tubes as and when they go and am almost fully LED now. Also put in a concentrated light fitting with 3 2ft tubes above the main work area all 6500k.

Not had any issues with blue light, though I do have the colour changing Phillips Hue in the living room and the 'daylight' setting on that is too blue for me.
 

Sideways

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It's very subjective.
I would hate to work in 6500K - far too cold and blue for me.
Even 5000K is pushing it
2700K and 3000K are my choices in the house
4000K is as cold as we go for working spaces like our Kitchen and my workshop

Think about where your end product is going to live when you finish it. If an item was going in my house and you made it to look good under 6500K lights, it could look far too yellow-orange one in place.

The colder the colour of your lights, the more lumens the manufacturer can claim (because they all start off as blue - ultraviolet LEDs and then yellow phosphor is coated on top to make them visible and "warm" the colour up, but harsh bright bluer toned light doesn't mean that you can see well - think of those blue white headlights that were a fad 20 years ago.

High CRI is great advice whatever you choose.
 

LambCrafter

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Thanks for that info. I've read in a few places that 5000k is optimal for woodworking but not actual found anyone who has reported that this works in practice. I'm erring towards the 6500k like yourself but a little concerned about this being at the far end of the blue spectrum. Can I ask if you have natural light coming into your garage, i.e. do you depend totally on the LED tubes for lighting?
I do have direct light if I open the garage doors (and possibly annoy the neighbours!). Usually I have one door open. Just this afternoon we had a bit of a hailstorm so closed both doors. The working environment under the lights/tubes was fine for me (using a mitre saw and doing some assembly). Hope that helps.
 

eribaMotters

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I have the housings / fittings already. Not sure what you mean by more than just an LED tube? How else would you install T8 tubes for lighting?

Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the input but I'm confused as to the suggestion of tubes only???
Sorry Shed9 I didn't explain that .
I would buy new fittings that have the impact proof diffuser on them. I've hit many a tube in the past and it is not nice when they break with you standing underneath.

Colin
 

EddyCurrent

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The lamps I currently use are fluorescent, they have been in for over 10 years meaning LEDs were not an option at the time.

Specification of each tube;
GE Polylux XL F58W/860
58Watt
1500mm length
20,000 hours life
6000 temperature (Daylight)
5220 lumens

The OSRAM fitting linked to previously might be a good upgrade, they are still 55W but the lumens are 6400
Lamps on their own to fit my existing fittings are about 2000 lumens which is too low.
 
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