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LED lighting for workshop

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shed9

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Sorry Shed9 I didn't explain that .
I would buy new fittings that have the impact proof diffuser on them. I've hit many a tube in the past and it is not nice when they break with you standing underneath.

Colin
That makes sense and I should have realised what you meant at the time (now thinking about it).
 

shed9

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It's very subjective.
I would hate to work in 6500K - far too cold and blue for me.
Even 5000K is pushing it
2700K and 3000K are my choices in the house
4000K is as cold as we go for working spaces like our Kitchen and my workshop

Think about where your end product is going to live when you finish it. If an item was going in my house and you made it to look good under 6500K lights, it could look far too yellow-orange one in place.

The colder the colour of your lights, the more lumens the manufacturer can claim (because they all start off as blue - ultraviolet LEDs and then yellow phosphor is coated on top to make them visible and "warm" the colour up, but harsh bright bluer toned light doesn't mean that you can see well - think of those blue white headlights that were a fad 20 years ago.

High CRI is great advice whatever you choose.
I can kind of see where you are coming from but the general consensus seems to be 6500k which is where I'll probably end up with based on the feedback so far. I don't tend to work late and do and will have a fair amount of natural light coming is as well so shouldn't be an issue too much.
 

shed9

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Thanks for all the responses, it is all appreciated.

I will push the button on some 6500k tubes and see how it goes. I'll feedback myself when in situ.

Cheers.
 

Ozi

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Jumping on the 6500 K band wagon. I have 5000K in my utility room 6500K in the workshop, for the workshop 3 battens down the middle plus one each side on separate switches to get rid of shadows if necessary. I hardly ever use the side lights and never at the same time but still think they were worth the extra wiring when I do need them.
 

LJM

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I would have thought the blue element of 6500k would affect colour rendition, which is one of my concerns. I appreciate the Colour Rendering Index impacts that as well but I'm surprised to hear 6500k is better than lower down the scale. Good to know.
people such as artists who are all about colour rendition, go for cool lighting; traditionally that would have been natural north light. These days a diffuse cool light, and lots of it.
 

--Tom--

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I went with led panels in 6500, gives a good light that’s pleasant to work in.

I tried to avoid shadows as much as possible so i fitted more than I needed but it’s worked well
 

OldWood

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The problem in my opinion of batten lights in a workshop is that like the fluorescents they replace they cast shadows, and if the ceiling is on the low side they are of significant glare. The other factor too is that I wonder if the tubed LED has as much light output against the batten equivalent in that the tube can only have one row of LEDs in it whereas the batten type typically have two. And a further thought is that LED's being current driven, do have to dissipated some heat - how is that done in a tube?

I appreciate that the OP has already committed himself as far as fittings are concerned, but the panel type lights, all be it a tad more expensive, are so much better for lighting over a workbench. So I am very much with Dlxover on this.
Rob
 

Stevekane

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Im not a fan of daylight tubes, we were given a load of inset units with daylight tubes which I fitted in a hairdressers, within days complaints about colour rendering and the customers all looked dead! I spoke with Osrams tech bod who laughed when I told him and said that daylight tubes will wash out the colour, great for jewlery display caninets where you want cold and sparkly but no good for day to day use, his recomendation was warm light. We have a card shop near us and they must have also picked up a load of cheap daylight tubes, and its like walking into a fridge,,,cold and blue,,Im not sure if daylight tubes are really the same as “daylight” but I might be wrong?
Steve.
Ps I have had the Llidls led sealed units for a couple of years and very pleased with them.
 

TomGW

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I’ve used daylight led battens in my garage/workshop with a mix of 4’ and 5’. These are arranged alternately 4,5,4,5 etc in a rectangle spaced 4’ off the wall in a 17’x26’ garage. Ceiling height is 10’6” and the walls and ceiling are painted white. I wired all the 4’ on one circuit and all the 5’ on another. This gives me three stages of light, all 4’s, all 5’s or the whole lot. To be honest the 4’s are perfectly adequate for most things but the full array is amazing. No shadows at all, probably helped by the white walls and ceiling. I did work out the angle of illumination to determine that 4’ off the wall with a 10’6” ceiling would optimise the light. I bought the battens on eBay from a German seller. Similar available for 6x 4’ £49.95
 

Crazy Dave

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The amount of light and the colour of light can severely affect your sleep patterns so it's important to consider this when working in an environment without natural light. Whether 65k LED tubes with an amount of blue light provide an adequate light source to tell your brain that it's daytime remains to be seen (no pun intended).
I have just started installing 65k LED lights in my workshop build for this reason as I have sleep problems, I will let you know if it helps but it may be some time until it's completed.

I hope this helps shine some light on your purchase decision (pun intended).
 

Chippymint

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I fitted out my new workshop 12mx8m with Daylight White fluorescents and 600mmx600mm modular panels (50 & 60 watt). The panels are situated over the bench areas offering superb light where you need it.

These are around 4700 to 5000 Lm's. Personally having tried a range of lights during the installation this set up was perfect for a woodworking environment.
 

Sachakins

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Surprised how many people refer to the 6500 lumens as daylight tubes. They are not daylight they are far whiter/bluer.
Daylight tubes are around the 4000 to 5000 mark.
 

shed9

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Surprised how many people refer to the 6500 lumens as daylight tubes. They are not daylight they are far whiter/bluer.
Daylight tubes are around the 4000 to 5000 mark.
Most UK resellers of tubes designate 5000K to 6500K as Daylight hence why most people on here use that term. We are just using the industry standards.

6500 lumens
People are referring to the Kelvin value of the tubes, i.e. 6500K, not lumens. Kelvin is the temperature of the light output whereas lumens is the intensity. Separate things. I suspect this is maybe a typo on your part so no offence meant in correcting this either way but it is relevant which is why I raise it.
 

Droogs

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As i mentioned earlier, i think it has a lot to do with your personal colour perception and possibly how far north you live and the natural tone of light in your area. On that note whenever we go to Tuscanny and Lombardy, I am immediately struck by how yellow Italy is, SWMBO doesn't see it tho' when I mention it
 

shed9

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Too update, I've ordered a batch of LED glass tubed 6500K with a CRI of 80-89 (18W / 1800 lumens). I couldn't really find anything higher in CRI so went with the 80> for now. I am doing some product and product development photography but already have dedicated lights for this so the CRI number isn't that critical in that context. I'm going with 9 of 4ft twin units in the 8'x16' first fit out in a 3x3 pattern which equates to around >32,000 lumens.

I'll post my own feedback when they arrive.

Thanks everyone for the input, greatly appreciated.
 
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Sachakins

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Most UK resellers of tubes designate 5000K to 6500K as Daylight hence why most people on here use that term. We are just using the industry standards.


People are referring to the Kelvin value of the tubes, i.e. 6500K, not lumens. Kelvin is the temperature of the light output whereas lumens is the intensity. Separate things. I suspect this is maybe a typo on your part so no offence meant in correcting this either way but it is relevant which is why I raise it.
Yep, typo, your total correct, thanks for letting me know, no offence at all, thanks.
 
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