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Latest KT Tools Prototype - Cutting Gauge

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jimi43

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I have long since admired the old cutting gauges....the ones with the brass wedge parallel to the cutter...simple brass face and hardwood back with a brass shaft.

With this in mind I decided to design one with a slightly more modern look but with all the best features of the tried and tested version.

So here are the prototypes...the first I always keep and the second, Douglas (condeesteso) has ordered and has offered to review shortly.

So here they are....



The hardwood is...yes you guessed it...lignum vitae. This is a wonderful choice for the back since it is extremely hard-wearing and self lubricating so it slides beautifully without binding whilst allowing close tolerance machining. This minimises slop in the movement now...and in the future.

The brass elements are CZ121 high quality stock, the face being epoxied to the back and also studs are also sunk deep into the wood for added strength and to further prevent parting of the two. The cutter is 01 tool steel, tip hardened and then ground and honed.

Douglas has ordered a slightly shorter shaft...radius ends to the shaft to prevent dents to the bench on micro adjustment tapping and a custom thumbscrew.

Short and long shaft:



The slight radius is clearer in this shot...



As you can see...the wedge is solid brass...and fits parallel to the cutter....



...which is hardened at the cutting edge...double bevelled on one side only and positioned with the flat on the face side to give a more accurate reference edge.



Internally is a captive nut...the brass thumbscrew cap is brazed to a steel threaded rod for strength and longevity and a soft brass insert is fitted between the end of the screw and the shaft mating surface to reduce damage to the latter.

I have also been playing around with Corian off-cuts and made a presentation case for the original....



I really like that stuff...it is so versatile and now that I have solved the monomer welding technique....it is strong too!

I think I have a few refinements to make and short production once I have worked out viability but for now...another prototype in the KT Tools range.

Cheers guys and gals

Jim
 

condeesteso

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Brilliant Jim - maybe get my hands on it later today! I've gone for a bit shorter as the usual operating range for me is around 5 - 35mm, and mainly say 8 - 25mm. I found the longer one a little tail-heavy and I'm hoping the shorter will balance easier in the hand. The turned screw without knurling is based on one Jim made for an infill, but smaller. I didn't think the knurling would be necessary and the fit between shaft and head is so good, just a pinch should do.
I have tried the American ones (Titemark etc) but didn't get used to them, so a beauty like this which is more traditional English style will suit me very well. We may possibly need to reduce head dia a tads, but try it first. ('We', he says...). Must say the prototype was a dream to use though.
 

Vann

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Beautiful to look at. Beautiful pieces of engineering. But they look to be very heavy :?:

And I can't figure out what you've done with the wedge. It looks wrong to me - but you're not so daft as to have mis-assembled it - so what am I missing?

Cheers, Vann.
 

Harbo

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Nice work Jim

If I am being critical, I would comment one the raw costs of the materials used - unless you have a cheap source of Lignum and brass, as you seem to be making it out of solid stuff - even the nut?
But then again you must be aiming for the top end of the market - if so I think you should be knurling the knob? :)

Rod
 

Richard T

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Re knurling, during my recent immersion in lathe studies, in one of my books I saw a technique described to cut straight grooves, slowly, by simply having the job stationary in the chuck while manually winding the saddle back and forth, very gently advancing the cross slide.
Though how to keep the chuck locked in position and easily divide into equal portions will take some more sussing ...
 

bugbear

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Harbo":1mjrlscc said:
Nice work Jim

If I am being critical, I would comment one the raw costs of the materials used - unless you have a cheap source of Lignum and brass
Car boot dealing?

BugBear
 

pedder

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Hi Jim,

now that is wunderschön!

And you are very clever to make one for you in the first batch. People won't let you keep one of the next batches.

Cheers
Pedder
 

woodpig

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They look nicely made but maybe I'd have locked the cutter in place with another thumbscrew on the end instead of the wedge?
 

Harbo

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Richard T said
Though how to keep the chuck locked in position and easily divide into equal portions will take some more sussing ...
Use a Dividing Head and a locking pin see photo - the DH is the wheel on the left drilled with holes:



Or use a knurling tool - quite cheap from the likes of Chronos or RDG Tools

Rod
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Jim

Those are STUNNING!

I am at a loss for words ... almost :D
How easy are they to hold in one hand? - the round face/base looks quite a handful (pun intended).

Regards from Perth

Derek

ps why did you not use Jarrah?! :lol:
 

monkeybiter

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I have used repeated saddle traverses to cut square holes and it's not only a PITA but it puts abnormal stresses on the lead screw and half nuts. The knurls on Chronos's site are very cheap, you should go for a clamp type, again because they keep the stresses in the right place.
 

Pvt_Ryan

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... Speechless. Just wow.

I think the final touch (at least for me) would have been if you 'd polished the faceplate to a mirror. Unless that would have showed up your plugs, though perhaps a contrasting set would have looked well.
 

bugbear

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Pvt_Ryan":21ybf4o6 said:
... Speechless. Just wow.

I think the final touch (at least for me) would have been if you 'd polished the faceplate to a mirror. Unless that would have showed up your plugs, though perhaps a contrasting set would have looked well.
Since that face is a sliding surface on the workpiece, I don't think it's a good idea, unless you're aiming for a fettled and unused tool beyond even my fevered notions.

BugBear
 

Pvt_Ryan

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bugbear":20fllscy said:
Pvt_Ryan":20fllscy said:
... Speechless. Just wow.

I think the final touch (at least for me) would have been if you 'd polished the faceplate to a mirror. Unless that would have showed up your plugs, though perhaps a contrasting set would have looked well.
Since that face is a sliding surface on the workpiece, I don't think it's a good idea, unless you're aiming for a fettled and unused tool beyond even my fevered notions.

BugBear
Oh it's a tool??? I thought it was a work of art for the mantle piece.. ;)


I didn't actually expect it to stay with a mirror finish, I was just thinking it would be a nice touch..
 
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