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Laminated Cofee table - Jason Heap

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Aled Dafis

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Guys, any idea how this table was made? I've admired Jason Heap's work for quite a while, but haven't got it clear in my mind how it's put together.



I'm guessing that he laminated 8 "arches" and then joined the corners with some sort of glued in key in the four "junctions".

Cheers
Aled
 

yetloh

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No idea, I'm afraid. I do know it took him a long time to perfect but, when I saw him at Cheltenhsm I didn't have the cheek to ask him how.

Jim
 

Aled Dafis

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Yes the making is very impressive, and I can see how it would have taken a while to perfect.

The reason for asking is that I'd like to introduce this kind of construction to my GCSE students, but I know that as soon as I show them the picture, the first thing they'll ask is how was it made? I'm quite tempted to drop him an e-mail to ask, but I'm sure that he'd be keen to keep his construction method close to his chest.
 

alex8_en

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My guess would be alternated thin laminations( one direction runs trough joint other stops at the joint and then oposit direction runs trough in next layer so it forms a sort ot comb joint) over a former and then veneer to finish... As I said just a guess
 

TheTiddles

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Ask him! I would personally do it the way Alex suggests so there is more to locate on, but what does he have to hide? It would be perfectly possible to buy one and cut it apart to see so I doubt there's much more to it than the details. Now actually doing it...

Aidan
 

goldeneyedmonkey

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How would you attach the base to the glass? I've got a similar kind of glass-to-timber joint that needs gluing and I've no idea what type of glue to use etc. Any help would be much appreciated.

Cheers _Dan.
 

Aled Dafis

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I doubt that the glass top is actually fixed at all, my guess is that it just sits on four clear rubber pads, relying on friction to keep it in position.
 

alex8_en

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1+ for that aled, but I've also seen uv light activated glues used by kitchen fitters to attach stainless steel support on glass breakfast bar but I would like to know more about it too

Ps: i know its out of topic, but do you still sell those shoulder plane kits?
 

frosties

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I'd guess its 2 pieces of bendy ply with the end grain painted back.
The eight pieces you see look like veneers to me.
just a guess but its a lovely table. Like a mobius loop almost
 

Eric The Viking

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Jason is a nice guy. I don't know how much he'd divulge mind, but it's worth asking.
My guess is that it's properly laminated-up, and far from simple.

That table was at Cheltenham last year (2010). As far as I could see the glass simply rests on top. It looks fantastic close-to, as did all of the show!

E.
 

Richard T

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It's easy to make out the butt mitres on the outsides of the joints - not so easy to see any clues on the insides, not in this photo anyway. There must be at least a bit of tension in those joints no matter how well bent the wood was, so somewhere, I guess there has to be a large surface area for glue and/or long, flat joints. :?:
 
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