Is this the right tool for the job?

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I want to cut some 5mm silver steel rod into 15mm pieces and put a small chamfer on one end.

I was thinking of buying one of these bandsaws below

I used to have a Evolution cold cut saw but all pieces of metal flying everywhere scared the hell out of me. The bandsaws don't look as brutal.
I was going to get a chamfer tool which fits into a normal drill which
120988-large_default.jpg
is normally used to chamfer threaded rods and then use the bandsaw to cut to length..

Is it a good idea?
120988-large_default.jpg
 
I did look into that, haven't used one since school!
I looked at the mini lathes not sure what they are like compared to a proper one?
But unsure how long it would take to cut pieces of 5mm rods at 15mm?
 
How many pieces?

The factory-supplied blade with the bandsaw might be a little coarse for 5mm. The ends of the pieces would have visible saw marks so if they need to be smoother, you'd have to rub on a disk sander.

Check that the typical chamfer tool fill go as small as 5mm. It will give some kind of chamfer, but especially if hand-held in a cordless drill the chamfer might not be very consistent.

Again, a disk sander with a mitre gauge could be a better option: prepare both ends of the SS and cut a 15mm piece off each end using an end stop in the bandsaw.

The non-chamfered end of the 15mm piece will require deburring. What do you have that will hold a short length of small diameter material so you can do this?

Edit: could you accommodate 16mm length (also available in stainless)?

https://www.gwr-fasteners.co.uk/5mm-x-16mm-dowel-pins-din-6325---hardened--ground-steel-14389-p.asp
 
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I have one like this and find it a great tool, one of the drawbacks is the minimum length as there is quite a gap between the blade and vice. Which means not getting the most out of a rod.
I would need to try and cut a small diameter rod, as if I need a piece that small I tend to get the hacksaw out as it is normally just for one cut.
When I go out to the workshop later, I will check the vice to blade gap.
You can take the unit off of the stand and use it free hand while holding the part in a bench vice.
 
Thanks for the replies..

The chamfer tool is for 3mm to 20mm so will try it.

Not sure How many pieces as its an on going project so maybe hundreds.
I could make a jig to hold the pieces and bridge the gap between vice and saw blade. I do have a bench belt sander to clean up the ends also
 
...one of the drawbacks is the minimum length as there is quite a gap between the blade and vice.

Screw a piece of 5mm thick flat steel strip to each vise jaw, close the jaws and cut through both pieces.

Effectively, you are making a 'zero clearance' vise, at the cost of losing 10mm in overall gripping width.

You can put a jacking screw at the opposite end of the steel strip to the blade, which will help prevent the moving jaw twisting when cutting short pieces.
 
Screw a piece of 5mm thick flat steel strip to each vise jaw, close the jaws and cut through both pieces.

Effectively, you are making a 'zero clearance' vise, at the cost of losing 10mm in overall gripping width.

You can put a jacking screw at the opposite end of the steel strip to the blade, which will help prevent the moving jaw twisting when cutting short pieces.

Yes the vice can be modified, I chose not to as I am cutting larger pieces than what the OP want to cut.

I have cut some silver steel today just under the 5mm there is a little vibration but still leaves a reasonable finish even with the gap
 
Good excuse to get a metal lathe. You'll wonder how you did without one

^^ This.
Even my wife has come around to understanding it's usefulness.
Metal Lathe - Every good home should have one (y)
 
I have the Sheppach version. It will cut 125x65 rolled channel with ease, so I think to call it a toy is a little harsh. The so called "vice" that it comes with is awful, but otherwise a very good piece of kit.
 
I have a Milwaukee handheld bandsaw. Capacity about 5".
The cuts below are 20mm dia mild steel, so with a fine blade I think the proposed Scheppach might do a competent job and quite quickly.
I would be tempted to alternate between the saw for a cut and a disc or belt sander to dress the end of the bar stock and apply a chamfer before snipping off the next 15mm length.

That would leave one raw end on each "peg" to be finished so maybe a simple holder to be made to help dress those too.
 

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I usually clean up bar ends on a belt. If you want a chamfer then mount the rod in a drill and hold it against the belt at the desired angle, depends how precise you need them to be. Important thing that many people ignore is that the work surface should be moving in the opposite direction to the belt. So if using a vertical belt, travelling down towards the table, if working from the left your bar should be rotating clockwise, from the right anti clockwise. Makes a significant difference to the finish.
 

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