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doctor Bob

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I think thats a bit of an old fashioned outlook Roger. Things move on but they have as many training / flying hours as before.
Its a bit like saying drivers don't know how to brake properly because now all cars are fitted with servos.
At least one guy in the cockpit will be very experienced.
This landing was extremely dangerous but had very little to do with gliding, the engines on either side kept it level once on the ground.
 

RogerS

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No, Bob, you're wrong.

If you look closely as he comes in to land that he is tail heavy for quite a while thus maintaining his angle of attack and giving him a certain amount of aileron control because he doesn't want to dump it down immediately on the engines as that is where the fuel is. So he gradually brings the nose down after he has been sliding for a while down the runway and only then brings the engines into contact with the ground.
 

doctor Bob

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RogerS":3t8bjwfe said:
No, Bob, you're wrong.
How very dare you .......... :lol: :lol:

Listen, I'm the first to admit when I'm wrong, I remember last time this happened back in 1982, I apologised straight away until we realised I was right in the first place.
 

theartfulbodger

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RogerS":28pmk01r said:
as he comes in to land that he is tail heavy for quite a while thus maintaining his angle of attack and giving him a certain amount of aileron control because he doesn't want to dump it down immediately on the engines as that is where the fuel is. So he gradually brings the nose down after he has been sliding for a while down the runway and only then brings the engines into contact with the ground.
All landings are controlled crashes, gradually losing airspeed until the plane stalls, ie isn't going fast enough for the air over the wings to provide enough lift to keep the plane flying.
A good landing is where is this point happens when the wheels are very close to the ground..

It's been a long time since I flew a glider, and never one as big as that jet :shock: but maybe the nose up attitude was needed to produce enough lift to keep the thing in the air while it was losing airspeed?

I imagine it would be possible to shut off the fuel supply to the engines, and that they would make great sacrificial "brakes" :mrgreen: if a little deformable and expensive...
 

sometimewoodworker

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RogerS":389supuf said:
An absolutely immaculate emergency landing. Just so happens that he, like the pilot who landed in the Hudson, was also an experienced glider pilot. Can't help but feel that with the move to fly-by-wire that some 'seat-of-the-pants' experience will have been lost or not experienced.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-15543209
I think the Iran air landing is even more impressive, as he landed with rear wheels only as the nose wheels would not deploy http://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...ith-ban-for-safely-landing-plane-6255861.html

The flight IR-742 from Moscow, Sheremetyevo was on approach to Tehran's Imam Khomeini Airport around when the crew did not receive a down and locked indication for the nose gear and aborted the approach. Following unsuccessful troubleshooting the crew decided to divert to Tehran's Mehrabad Airport where a low approach confirmed the nose gear was not extended. The crew subsequently performed a landing without the nose gear and came to a stand still on both main gear and the nose of the aircraft. The aircraft was evacuated, no injuries occurred
http://www.englishforum.ch/internat...b727-pilot-lands-plane-without-nose-gear.html
 

RogerS

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Pvt_Ryan":2tecndqm said:
His landing was better than 99% of the ones by RyanAir WITH wheels!!!
Well, if they will make the pilots pay for their own uniforms and the coffee that they drink while taking a break during flying ...........
 

Rob Platt

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flown a lot with ryan air never had a dodgy landing or a late arrival
all the best
rob
 

mailee

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Woo Hoo, that is one hell of a crosswind on the second landing Dave! Got to admire the TNT pilot to bring it down like that. :eek:
 

SketchUp Guru

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Yes indeed. Reminds me of the landings I made during my private pilot check ride. the examiner finally said, "Let's go back before you kill us both." :oops: He did give me my ticket though and I never made landings as bad as those afterward. Don't get me wrong, I made bad landings but those were the worst ever. No skid marks on the undersides of the wings fortunately.

Here's more aviation videos: http://www.alexisparkinn.com/aviationVideos.shtml
 

Jonzjob

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Bob you said 'This landing was extremely dangerous but had very little to do with gliding, the engines on either side kept it level once on the ground."

BUT the problem was that both of those engines had to touch the ground together and touch very gently and remember the driver was 10 foot or so lower than any other landing he had ever done before so there were no real references for him. All of his instrumentation would have been useless. "30 feet, flare"? No way. He was still too high!

If either engine had touched first the aircraft would have slewed and the driver would have been helpless to stop the tragedy that would surely have followed!

It has to be one of the very best landings I have ever seen and if I were in an aircraft that had a problem then I would not mind at all if he were the driver!
 

RogerS

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Dave R":9fc899ku said:
Yes indeed. Reminds me of the landings I made during my private pilot check ride. the examiner finally said, "Let's go back before you kill us both." :oops: ....l
That's funny...those were the words my gliding instructor said to me :oops:
 

doctor Bob

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I shouldn't have really commented, as my track record on aeroplanes is not too good, I lived in the Australian outback during my early 20's flying everyday, during this time, the co pilot shot a hole in the pilots door whilst trying to shoot a dingo from the air with a shot gun (he was not happy), the propeller on one of the small single engine planes came off and a tail dragger went nose down on landing resulting in expensive damage.
Numerous other dodgy moments but minor compared to above.
I was on a sheep station and we used the planes to round up the sheep and commute around the station (big farm).
 
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