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obraiche

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Hello. I am returning to woodcarving after quite a break.

I used to be a self employed woodcarver but due to health issues I have hardly done any for 15 or so years. Current unemployment has encouraged me to get the tools out again. I may not be able to do a full days work in oak like I used to but I am planning on trying relatively shallow relief panel work in softer timbers.

Currently looking to find suppliers of timbers and finishing materials as I am in a different area and many of my old contacts no longer exist. I will have a good look around the site and no doubt be back with a few questions.

Regards
Steven
 

obraiche

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Thanks Lons.

Boddys were my first choice as I used to get some nice lime from them. Spoke to them on the phone though and they no longer stock it! I was very suprised. They do stock basswood though. I thought that was just the USA name for Lime but apparently not.

I am also after Sugar Pine or any similar, carveable pine.
 

Lons

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obraiche":2zqcduzp said:
Thanks Lons.

Boddys were my first choice as I used to get some nice lime from them. Spoke to them on the phone though and they no longer stock it! I was very suprised. They do stock basswood though. I thought that was just the USA name for Lime but apparently not.

I am also after Sugar Pine or any similar, carveable pine.
Hi Steve

I'm surprised. I've had a number of decent bits, still have some as it happens. There mustn't have been enough of a market.

Basswood is light and easy to carve, used by pattern makers I think but it's softer than lime. Finished carvings are easily marked if handled carelessly.

Bob
 

theturner

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Snainton wood turning is a good place for timber and
most things you need to work it. They have a web page
if you are interested.
Roger
 

Digit

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Basswood is Lime, Lime is Basswood, but which Lime were you after?

* Tilia americana L. – Basswood, American Linden
* Tilia amurensis – Amur Lime, Amur Linden
* Tilia argentea – Silver Lime
* Tilia caroliniana – Carolina Basswood
* Tilia chinensis
* Tilia chingiana Hu & W.C.Cheng
* Tilia cordata Mill. – Small-leaved Lime, Little-leaf Linden or Greenspire Linden
* Tilia dasystyla Steven
* Tilia euchlora – Caucasian Lime
* Tilia henryana Szyszyl. – Henry's Lime, Henry's Linden
* Tilia heterophylla Vent. – White Basswood
* Tilia hupehensis – Hubei Lime
* Tilia insularis
* Tilia intonsa
* Tilia japonica – Japanese Lime, Shina (When used as a laminate)
* †Tilia johnsoni Wolfe & Wehr Eocene; Washington and British Columbia
* Tilia kiusiana
* Tilia mandshurica – Manchurian Lime
* Tilia maximowicziana
* Tilia mexicana (T. americana var. mexicana)
* Tilia miqueliana
* Tilia mongolica – Mongolian Lime, Mongolian Linden
* Tilia nasczokinii – Nasczokin's Lime, Nasczokin's Linden
* Tilia nobilis
* Tilia occidentalis – West lime
* Tilia oliveri – Oliver's Lime
* Tilia paucicostata
* Tilia platyphyllos Scop. – Large-leaved Lime
* Tilia rubra – Red Stem Lime (syn. T. platyphyllos var. rubra)
* Tilia tomentosa Moench – Silver Lime, Silver Linden
* Tilia tuan

You'll notice that the so called 'Common Lime' is not even listed, it's a hybrid, in fact the most common is the Small Leaved Lime, Cordata.

Roy.
 

Lons

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Hi Roy

You must have swallowed Wikipedea :lol: :lol: I doubt that the merchants would have a clue given that list TBH

I'm not sure which variety of lime I bought over the years but suspect it has been the common or a the small leaf variety. I have carved a number of items from American basswood as well and the characteristics have been very different. e.g. you can mark basswood easily with a fingernail and blunt chisels will crush the surface fibres whilst "lime" is harder and allows a much crisper / cleaner cut. Given a choice, basswood would be lowish on the list for me.
I would liken basswood to a slightly harder and of course much heavier balsa wood.

Bob
 

Digit

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I think I worked just about every flipping one of them as an apprentice! The Small Leaved Lime we bought in as felled trees and converted. Lovely stuff to work, a bit bland to look at though.
Frankly I would think that British grown Common or Small Leaved Limes would only be available as storm falls now a days.
I only know of one mature Small Leaved Lime locally.

Roy.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Tilia Vulgaris x Europeae is the hybrid .
Basswood is light, straight, and featureless. One of it's uses is the frames in bee hives, which are very small section.
Lime was used as brake brake blocks on cartwheels because it would smoulder rather than burst into flame, apparently.
 

obraiche

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I haven't carved poplar but searching for it led me to Sykes Timber who also have both lime and yellow pine. :)

Thanks for the interesting list Digit but plain old vulgaris has always been good enough for a commoner like me. ;)

phil.p":1s5c9tvu said:
Lime was used as brake brake blocks on cartwheels because it would smoulder rather than burst into flame, apparently.
I can vouch for the smouldering! I once had to router loads of Egyptian hierogliphics 3mm wide by 5mm deep into dozens of lime panels. Too narrow a channel to carve. Progress was limited by visibility and speed of supply of replacement cutters.
 
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