Has he torn our flue liner ?

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flanajb

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We had our chimney swept for the first time in 3 years a few weeks ago. A few days later I noticed a ring of rust has formed on the top of the burner which to me indicates water is coming down the liner.

We have a cowl on the top of the liner so water should not be able to enter from the top of the chimney.

Just wondering whether there is a way to test whether the liner has been damaged
 
A photo would help.

I presume this is a solid fuel burner, i which case the liner should be stainless, so sweeping shouldn`t damage it, but as i say a photo would be useful.
 
If its a copex liner they are not that hard to damage.

Has he pushed the cowel off with his brush?

Jason
 
Another thing that comes to mind is that if this a a fairly new installation, then the gap between the liner & the chimney itself should have been filled with vermiculite insulation, all the way to the cowl.

In this case any damage to the liner would result in vermiculite entering the liner & dropping down in to the burner.

Copex is a brand name, covering a range of liners, stainless steel liners are quite difficult to damage, whilst aluminum are damage easily, only stainless ones are suitable for solid fuel.
 
It is a flexible flue liner and there is no vermiculite surrounding the liner (because I installed it :oops: )

I will have another look tomorrow at the cowl on the top, but that was put on very tight with straps, so i doubt it is that.
 
flanajb":2rzuxfn0 said:
It is a flexible flue liner and there is no vermiculite surrounding the liner (because I installed it :oops: )

I will have another look tomorrow at the cowl on the top, but that was put on very tight with straps, so i doubt it is that.

As Doug b said, it needs to be insulated to help prevent condensation. (part of buiding regs methinks)?

Bob
 
flanajb":3fwbd3pt said:
We had our chimney swept for the first time in 3 years

Have you checked your home insurance to see if there is a clause about having your chimney swept yearly?

We have to have ours done twice a year.


Andy
 
Its not a requirement to insulate but recommended on open walls (ie not a terrace/semi wall).

The only way to tell if its torn is to get a camera up there and have a look.

Is it 316 or 904 liner?
 
I take back my previous comment. Just had a quick look at the regs and can't find any reference to insulation. In fact there is a clear statement that the space should be left empty unless contrary to manufacturer instruction. It does differ dependant on type of fuel used though.

Installing a liner is subject to building control however.

I also found this paragraph -
Relined flues , E7 A flue which has been relined may be checked to show that it is free from restrictions, such as from surplus material (where that can occur) and that it is acceptably gastight by using the same tests as would be applied in the case of a newly built flue.
However, a flue which has been relined with a flexible metal liner in accordance with Paragraph 3.36 of this Approved Document may be assumed to be unobstructed and acceptably gastight. (The use of a coring ball or inappropriate sweeps brushes can seriously damage a flexible metal flue liner.)
 
Lons":17yfnall said:
Installing a liner is subject to building control however.

I think changing a bulb is going to be notfieable as of next year
 
be very careful with flexible liners for chimneys.

i am a volunteer fireman here and last winter, three of four call outs i attended for chimney fires, were fires that broke through flexi liners because they cannot be cleaned properly.

the big problem we then faced was finding the seat of the fire.

the only solution is to pull out the whole flue.

this a clsassic example of "blanket" building regs unsuitable to old houses.

jeff
 
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