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Government Assessment on MDF

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Adam

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Neil,

I had a read of that link, and I did think it was a bit poor - they didn't seem to be quite saying it was or wasn't carcinogenic. It "might" be.

However, one thing you can be certain of, and that is normal soft and hardwood dust definately is carcinogenic. See here:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wis1.pdf

HSE Website":1xu4rbsx said:
In COSHH, hardwood dust is defined as a carcinogen.
Whilst I'm sure everyone is watching out for MDF dust, just remember, all dust is a known carcinogen, and I don't think MDF should be singled out particularly, as all dust is bad.

I don't use any "extra" precaution with MDF as you should be using the same level of extraction/mask/etc wth every wood you use!!!!

Adam
 

Keith Smith

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asleitch said:
Neil,

I had a read of that link, and I did think it was a bit poor - they didn't seem to be quite saying it was or wasn't carcinogenic. It "might" be.


If you had read that thread properly you would have noticed that it was about the long term effects of formaldehyde emmission, not the carcinogenic properties of wood dust which is well documented.

No one knows if the formaldehyde emmissions from MDF will be a problem in the future as it can off gas for years.

Woodsmith
 

Midnight

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call me paranoid.... but personally I don't think the risks are worth it. I never touch the stuff... don't intend to change any time soon.....
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Keith

KeithS":37g819us said:
If you had read that thread properly you would have noticed that it was about the long term effects of formaldehyde emmission, not the carcinogenic properties of wood dust which is well documented. No one knows if the formaldehyde emmissions from MDF will be a problem in the future as it can off gas for years.
Yes, you're absolutely right, as the "research" shows the long term effects are just not known.

At the time I was going to start a separate formaldehyde thread, but I had a phone call and had to leave the office in a hurry to pick up swmbo. Adam did not have the benefit of the formaldehyde thread, which I will start now.

Cheers
Neil
 

Adam

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KeithS":1t8m5t1f said:
If you had read that thread properly you would have noticed that it was about the long term effects of formaldehyde emmission, not the carcinogenic properties of wood dust which is well documented.

No one knows if the formaldehyde emmissions from MDF will be a problem in the future as it can off gas for years.

Woodsmith
Keith,

Keith, the formaldehyde gas emission information was new to me (so that was very interesting - thanks) I have to admit to having given up using MDF a while ago, for a number of reasons. A) Firstly, like you said, it's long term effects are not known. This worries me - but as with all products, until you have a good statistical batch of people to analyse (e.g. lots of people exposed over a long time) we won't have a good idea of it's medical effect. Either way, I'm not taking the chance, nor will I be one of the statistical "batch"!
B) I never really like working with it. It's no fun to cut, to plane, etc. C) I'd like my projects to me around in 200 years - and I don't think it is known if it will suffer effects of heat, moisture, glue degradation which might spoil your nice "antique" chair that great-great-great grandad Adam made. (No folks, you can't read anything into the last statement :shock: )

Adam (who has his extractor vented out of his workshop so any fine dust, which slips through the filters, doesn't get circulated back into the workshop. (esp MDF dust).
 

Dewy

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With reference to known long term effects. How many must become ill or die before the effects are known?
My father in law was a chippie for a well known company making concrete garages. As well as making the shuttering molds he made the wooden doors. He contracted asthma which cost him a small fortune in prescriptions just to keep going. He always said that the Western red cedar, used for doors, was the cause & was tested a few times for a wood allergy. He was never specifically tested for cedar. His argument was that as the cedar didnt rot then the same must be happening in his lungs because masks were not used in those days. He had a couple of heart attacks & because of his weakened state didnt survive the second. This was 26 years ago. Now wood dust is a known carcinogen but it wasn't then.
 
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While I agree that the ingestion of WOOD dust is to be avoided, most dust in a fine form is dangerous. I wonder how many of the contributors to this thread smoke, or visit smoky pubs,or drink alchohol, KNOWN to cause health problems but ignored by vast numbers.
 

Noel

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Further to all the above, serveral states in the US have now banned dumping in landfill sites ply, MDF and other sheet materials due to the long term concerns of the various adhesives used in these materials.

Rgds

Noel
 

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