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First time with finishing oil

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LyNx

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I need to finish my sample fridge doors with Chestnut finishing oil. The veneer i have picked is figured european walnut but not much figure in it :cry: .

I have never used oils before and ordered the 100mm Chestnut Jenny brush (foam) to apply this. I understand that you don't need much to coat the panels but any tips. Do i rub down between coats?

Andy
 

Adam

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After applying it I leave it for now more than 2-3 minutes before removing all the excess with a cloth. If you don't you get this slow-drying sticky shiney gloop.

Adam
 

Philly

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The Chestnut oil is an oil/varnish blend that sets pretty quick (overnight compared to days). It builds up pretty fast too!
I apply the first coat with a brush, saturating the whole piece. Then 10 minutes later remove all excess with rags until dry-ish to the touch. Leave overnight.
The second coat is brush on, but lightly. I like to use fine sandpaper (say 400 grit) and then rub the wet oil into the surface, going with the grain. This removes any nibs and leaves a silky smooth surface. Also, any sawdust made is packed into the pores with the oil giving a smoother surface. Leave overnight.
Any further coats are applied with a rag. I lightly dip the rag into the oil and then rub it gently into the piece, wiping away until it is all gone. This leaves a lovely surface that is also water/heat resistant. A coffee table I finished with this oil/method has held up very well over the past months.
It's a pretty easy finish to apply and you cant really mess it up. If you leave a too much on the surface the next application will melt it and it can be "rubbed in".
Hope this is of help-do let us know how you get on.
Cheers
Philly :D
 

LyNx

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Thanks for the replies you lot

I've prepared samples pieces to test on and i'll let you know the outcome.

Working with a big industrial spray booth and polishing line, i didn't want to use these and wanted to use the traditional methods, so it new to me

Andy
 

DaveL

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I have used finishing oil, (liberon, sorry Terry) for most of the things I have made. I like as it’s almost impossible to screw up. :roll:
I use any cheap brush to flood the first coat on, leave for 10 minutes and rag off any that has not been absorbed. Leave to dry over night and then put on another coat, this does not need to be so liberally applied as the first coat will hopefully of sealed the surface and you are now working on building the finish up. Once again wipe off after 10 minutes. I used to rub down with 0000 wire wool, but have started to use the fine webrax, I have tried the non abrasive one, I did not get on with it. I put anything from 3 to 6+ coats on, more on tops of things that will have drinks put on them.
I have even oiled pine doors with it, looks much better than polyurethane (sorry Norm!) :wink:

Be careful with the rags, do not leave them screwed up, they can self ignite, lay them out flat or hang them up to dry, they will go stiff as the oil goes off, or burn them in the shop wood burner, one at a time for a satisfying roar as the oil flares up the stack. :twisted:
 

LyNx

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Thanks Dave, will it cause a problem flooding the first coat if i'm applying to a veneered board, 0.6mm veneer?

Andy
 

DaveL

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I must be honest, I don't know, I have never veneered anything, :oops: but I can't see why it should be a problem.
 

Chris Knight

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Andy,

There should be no problem applying finishing oil to a veneered board unless it is stuck with impact adhesive in which case it might soften the glue. The limited volume of wood will just accept less oil than a solid board.

Do bear in mind that all finishing oils on the market are essentially long-oil varnishes, that is they have the same components as a varnish but in different ratios. Thus a drying oil like tung oil will be there in large proportion but a thinner like white spirits will also be present as well as other stuff (resins and driers mainly).
 

LyNx

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Never veneered anything, you don't know what your missing - all those bare mdf/chipboard panels getting a face lift.

I used a special press glue here at work to apply the veneers, and this doesn't get effected by thinners etc. so i should be ok in that department. I'm going to play with the samples first to see the results before hitting the main panels. They are only a sample to see what the finish and veneers look like before a start the main kitchen


Andy
 

LyNx

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I have applied 5 coats of the oil so far but i still have a flat, matt finish. Do i need to apply mores coats to get a slight gloss level or finish with a wax.

As this is for kitchen doors, i'm not sure the wax will last and the oil hasn't given enough depth at the moment. Any advise

Andy
 

Chris Knight

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Andy,

You will get a glossier look the more coats you put on. My daughter used it for a sink surround and it had some 10 coats on it and looks quite glossy.

However, why you (or my daughter for that matter) want to use it for a kitchen, especially if you want a slightly glossy look, puzzles me. You could achieve the same effect more quickly with regular polyurethane varnish. Bring up the grain with a coat of oil then when dry, apply the varnish.
 

LyNx

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To be honest i'm starting to think the same thing. If i have to apply 10 coats to the whole kitchen once done, then i'll be there for weeks with panels everywhere.

Edit: Just been told the same thing you have suggested. So i'll get a tin of varnish on the way home

Thanks

Andy
 

LyNx

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Quick update. I saturating the whole piece as Philly stated and then removed 95% of the oil after 10 minutes. This left a slight amount of oil still on the panels which soaked in after an hour. The panels look good even after the first coat. I'm going to add two more coats over the next few days and may not use the top coat of poly as i did want a 100% oil finish.

But as mentioned before, it really is easy stuff to use (just adding the safety sheet to the folder, easily downloadable from the site =D> )

Andy
 

Philly

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Andy
I find three coats will give a nice shine without a thick plasticy coat.
Hope it works out for you.
Philly :D
 

LyNx

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Philly":1pxy136a said:
The second coat is brush on, but lightly. I like to use fine sandpaper (say 400 grit) and then rub the wet oil into the surface, going with the grain.
Do you need to do this to fill the grain, or will more coats help.

I'm experimenting with the oil again for the countertop in the kitchen and would like to get the grain filled.

Andy
 

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