• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Few questions on a shed/workshop build

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
48
Reaction score
5
Location
chaddesden derby
Hey everyone,

Im starting off to design and build my own workshop/shed. Will be hoping to build it in the summer. My plan is to lay a concrete slab down possibly with rebar inforcement then lay a single course of bricks around the edge of the slab for the workshop to sit on and then have the concrete base as the floor. I will lay a dpm below the concrete base. Once stud walls are up I will cover the walls with either plywood or osb then put a breathable membrane on after that before the cladding goes on. Also I will be insulating the walls inside aswell eventually. The roof will just be standard apex boarded over then polyester type felt over the top. I will have a overhang with guttering installed eventually aswell.

My questions are as follows:

1.) The course of bricks I will lay will be the anti damp blue ones. Would it still be a good idea to lay a dpm between the brick and the soleplate of the stud wall or is this not required because os the anti damp bricks?

2.) I was thinking using 2x4 all around as I will be insulating the walls inside eventually aswell, so will need the depth for the insualtion. Is this overkill or will 3x2 be sufficiant?

3.) Im stuck on what parts to use treated timber and what parts to use non treated. Most youtube videos I watch they seem to be using untreated minus the base (but wont be having a timber base). I was thinking for the sole plate of the walls to use treated but then use untreated for the rest of the walls and the roof as once enclosed and water tight I cant see why I would need to have treated. Obviously the cladding will be treated. I just dont want to overspend on treated if I dont have to.

4.) Should I join the walls together using treated corner posts (seen this in a video on youtube which gave me the base idea) or just join them together one on one? If I use treated corner posts what size posts would you use remembering still that they will be sitting on a single course of bricks.

5.) For boarding the walls is OSB sufficiant or should I go with plywood? Also will it have to be treated or can I just use untreated as will be putting a breathable membrane on after that before the cladding goes on?

IF anyone could answer just one of these questions I would appreciate it. All of them though would be great too lol

Thanks in advance :) (y)
 

jvc26

Established Member
Joined
17 Aug 2019
Messages
26
Reaction score
7
Have you had a read on the workshop threads here?

 

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
842
Reaction score
380
Location
Bradford
I would use a dpm too.

Keep your studs at 4x2 same as the brick width. Give you a more solid build. Untreated apart from the base plate is fine.

Unless your using corner posts as a decorative feature I would just screw the walls together.

OSB is fine but ply is better. Non treated too.

Cheers James
 

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
48
Reaction score
5
Location
chaddesden derby
Have you had a read on the workshop threads here?

Thank you very much I will give us a good look over :) (y)
 

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
48
Reaction score
5
Location
chaddesden derby
I would use a dpm too.

Keep your studs at 4x2 same as the brick width. Give you a more solid build. Untreated apart from the base plate is fine.

Unless your using corner posts as a decorative feature I would just screw the walls together.

OSB is fine but ply is better. Non treated too.

Cheers James
Thank you very much. Much appreciated.

Whatever I choose to board the walls with. Wheather its osb or plywood, what thickness should I be looking at purchasing?

Thanks again
 

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
842
Reaction score
380
Location
Bradford
9 / 12mm as it's mainly to stop wracking forces twisting the structure.

Cheers James
 

MARK.B.

Established Member
Joined
4 Jul 2012
Messages
1,138
Reaction score
239
Location
East Yorkshire
Treated or untreated there is not a great difference in price so I would go for Treated all round and be done with it, remember though that once you cut your treated timber then the cut ends need to be treated with something. 4x2 for me + DPM, again the overall cost increase over 3x2 is not huge and as we all know sometimes that extra inch can make all the difference o_O
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,370
Reaction score
392
Location
Wiltshire

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,345
Reaction score
300
Location
Aberdeen
Finished wall from inside to out.
Finish, plywood, vapour barrier, insulation, breather membrane, battens, cladding.

Temptation once you have the frame up is to bang on the osb/ply, membrane, cladding. Then get a door on and use it. I made this mistake. If you’re going to insulate it then this will cause a problem, if your not going to insulate or internally finish then it fine.

I was pointed at Mike’s thread, skimmed it, thought I knew better, now I’ve gone to insulate and I’m left in a quandary.

Fitz
 

Dave Moore

Established Member
Joined
30 Apr 2019
Messages
35
Reaction score
11
Location
Scunthorpe
Hey everyone,

Im starting off to design and build my own workshop/shed. Will be hoping to build it in the summer. My plan is to lay a concrete slab down possibly with rebar inforcement then lay a single course of bricks around the edge of the slab for the workshop to sit on and then have the concrete base as the floor. I will lay a dpm below the concrete base. Once stud walls are up I will cover the walls with either plywood or osb then put a breathable membrane on after that before the cladding goes on. Also I will be insulating the walls inside aswell eventually. The roof will just be standard apex boarded over then polyester type felt over the top. I will have a overhang with guttering installed eventually aswell.

My questions are as follows:

1.) The course of bricks I will lay will be the anti damp blue ones. Would it still be a good idea to lay a dpm between the brick and the soleplate of the stud wall or is this not required because os the anti damp bricks?

2.) I was thinking using 2x4 all around as I will be insulating the walls inside eventually aswell, so will need the depth for the insualtion. Is this overkill or will 3x2 be sufficiant?

3.) Im stuck on what parts to use treated timber and what parts to use non treated. Most youtube videos I watch they seem to be using untreated minus the base (but wont be having a timber base). I was thinking for the sole plate of the walls to use treated but then use untreated for the rest of the walls and the roof as once enclosed and water tight I cant see why I would need to have treated. Obviously the cladding will be treated. I just dont want to overspend on treated if I dont have to.

4.) Should I join the walls together using treated corner posts (seen this in a video on youtube which gave me the base idea) or just join them together one on one? If I use treated corner posts what size posts would you use remembering still that they will be sitting on a single course of bricks.

5.) For boarding the walls is OSB sufficiant or should I go with plywood? Also will it have to be treated or can I just use untreated as will be putting a breathable membrane on after that before the cladding goes on?

IF anyone could answer just one of these questions I would appreciate it. All of them though would be great too lol

Thanks in advance :) (y)
Have you looked at these steel framed buildings. They will make to your requirements. Steel Framed Buildings by Permaroof UK | Enquire Today
 

dericlen

Established Member
Joined
22 Dec 2012
Messages
30
Reaction score
1
Location
Eye, Suffolk
Hi Everyone,
It's been a while since I visited the "workshop" but here we are again.
With a lifetime in the building industry and a good many "shed" experiences I felt I had to make a few comments here.
Without reading all the Q&A's here I would say, working up from the bottom and what I have found to be practical is;-
Build on mini strip founds just buried, 3 or 4 coarse good quality bricks (this will raise your bottom cill clear of G/L and contain your conc. floor)
Concrete does not need to be strong, even for the floor, it's more important to have a smooth (steel) trowelled finish treated with dustproofing and a good epoxy paint.
Needless to say the whole exercise needs to be constructed accurately, level square etc.
Holding down is important, also building sectional, (thinking of re-sale or moving)
4x2 I consider to be OTT, unless you are going 2stories, it's more important to design your studs & bracing to best effect.
Sheathing needs only to be fabric or felt allowing the walls to "breath"
I have successfully built sectional panels using breathable felt, 3/4ins mesh galv wire netting, 2cts very thin strong cement/sand render brush finish. The only drawback, they were heavy!
Another point of design would be, make the height at least 8ft clear inside, I made the panels 2,4m tall, it suits timber and board sizes without waste.
I could go on but not wishing to bore anyone I'll simply say Enjoy!
Dericlen.
 

TominDales

Established Member
Joined
21 Jan 2021
Messages
172
Reaction score
118
Location
Ripon
Things I wish my garage had.
Better roof and underfloor insulation for the winter, something in the roof to stop the heat going up and a layer under the concrete slab.
Enough Hight, as said earlier and if you have joists strong enough to store wood etc above head hight - subject to planning and other design considerations.
Also think climate change and future proof. My gutter got overwhelmed last year when we had a months rain in 3 hrs. Had some terrific storms and wind, blowing sheds around our neighbourhood. 100 year events happen every 5 to 10 years.
 

OldWood

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2005
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
64
Location
Edinburgh
When I retired 15 yrs ago, my wife had a mid life crisis and bought a Mazda MX5, so the garage had to be modified to accept the car plus my timber storage. And I built a new workshop 5 x 4m on the back.

So mini strip founds - build up with dense concrete blocks rather than bricks (quicker!) and actually look better - cast concrete (4 inch) inside on dpm - one more level of concrete blocks which are waterprrof so dpm not really required, then the prebuilt 3 x 2 in shed frames (untreated wood), screwed to the concrete blocks and to one another. I see that I made wood corner pieces for the cladding to butt up against. Roofed with Onduline directly onto OSB.

Plenty of guidance on insulation, etc elsewhere. OSB is perfectly adequate for internal surfacing. Floor insulation onto the trowelled but untreated concrete is the interlocking foam 'rubber' 600mm square mats which I got from Costco.

I don't think there is anything that I would change apart from the inevitable 'it should have been bigger'!:D

Rob
 

Sandyn

Established Member
Joined
19 Jul 2020
Messages
699
Reaction score
497
Location
Scotland
When I built my Garage, I designed the Attic truss's around standard wood lengths, so the rafter is 2.4m long and the joist 3.6 m. I made the design a standard attic cantilever, with the attic width just over 1.2 m wide. I designed in two doors at the end so I can easily get wood in and out of the garage attic. I can store 2.4X 1.2m sheets in the attic. It means I have a huge volume of storage space for wood, which I seem to fill with wood for recycling/up-cycling and junk!! The small triangular door is where I store my various ladders. It's 9m long and 3.6m wide. The attic design and doors have been very useful.

garage doors.jpg
 

quintain

Established Member
Joined
25 May 2007
Messages
29
Reaction score
4
Hi Everyone,
It's been a while since I visited the "workshop" but here we are again.
With a lifetime in the building industry and a good many "shed" experiences I felt I had to make a few comments here.
Without reading all the Q&A's here I would say, working up from the bottom and what I have found to be practical is;-
Build on mini strip founds just buried, 3 or 4 coarse good quality bricks (this will raise your bottom cill clear of G/L and contain your conc. floor)
Concrete does not need to be strong, even for the floor, it's more important to have a smooth (steel) trowelled finish treated with dustproofing and a good epoxy paint.
Needless to say the whole exercise needs to be constructed accurately, level square etc.
Holding down is important, also building sectional, (thinking of re-sale or moving)
4x2 I consider to be OTT, unless you are going 2stories, it's more important to design your studs & bracing to best effect.
Sheathing needs only to be fabric or felt allowing the walls to "breath"
I have successfully built sectional panels using breathable felt, 3/4ins mesh galv wire netting, 2cts very thin strong cement/sand render brush finish. The only drawback, they were heavy!
Another point of design would be, make the height at least 8ft clear inside, I made the panels 2,4m tall, it suits timber and board sizes without waste.
I could go on but not wishing to bore anyone I'll simply say Enjoy!
Dericlen.
I welcome advice on my family members garden shed design list:
Small 8' x 6' by about head height with a felted pitched roof with similar wood to the neighbours !!! (4" wide or so horizontal T&G with a brown stain look) to keep some gardening tools.

I welcome any/ all advice on T&G, will it shrink and expand leaving gaps and buckle with excess swelling.
 

Fergie 307

Established Member
Joined
28 Dec 2019
Messages
200
Reaction score
101
Location
Sandy Bedfordshire
Hey everyone,

Im starting off to design and build my own workshop/shed. Will be hoping to build it in the summer. My plan is to lay a concrete slab down possibly with rebar inforcement then lay a single course of bricks around the edge of the slab for the workshop to sit on and then have the concrete base as the floor. I will lay a dpm below the concrete base. Once stud walls are up I will cover the walls with either plywood or osb then put a breathable membrane on after that before the cladding goes on. Also I will be insulating the walls inside aswell eventually. The roof will just be standard apex boarded over then polyester type felt over the top. I will have a overhang with guttering installed eventually aswell.

My questions are as follows:

1.) The course of bricks I will lay will be the anti damp blue ones. Would it still be a good idea to lay a dpm between the brick and the soleplate of the stud wall or is this not required because os the anti damp bricks?

2.) I was thinking using 2x4 all around as I will be insulating the walls inside eventually aswell, so will need the depth for the insualtion. Is this overkill or will 3x2 be sufficiant?

3.) Im stuck on what parts to use treated timber and what parts to use non treated. Most youtube videos I watch they seem to be using untreated minus the base (but wont be having a timber base). I was thinking for the sole plate of the walls to use treated but then use untreated for the rest of the walls and the roof as once enclosed and water tight I cant see why I would need to have treated. Obviously the cladding will be treated. I just dont want to overspend on treated if I dont have to.

4.) Should I join the walls together using treated corner posts (seen this in a video on youtube which gave me the base idea) or just join them together one on one? If I use treated corner posts what size posts would you use remembering still that they will be sitting on a single course of bricks.

5.) For boarding the walls is OSB sufficiant or should I go with plywood? Also will it have to be treated or can I just use untreated as will be putting a breathable membrane on after that before the cladding goes on?

IF anyone could answer just one of these questions I would appreciate it. All of them though would be great too lol

Thanks in advance :) (y)
For boarding I use 8x2 t&g flooring chipboard. Easy to work with and cheaper than osb, and it's water resistant and gives you a nice smooth surface. I wouldn't personally bother with the brick course. I have bolted my faceplate straight to the concrete using self threading bolts, so no expansion they actually cut a thread in the concrete. Use dpm strip between the baseplate and the concrete with a squirt of silicone where the bolts pass through. If you use a dpm strip wider than the plate then you can leave a strip inside for the bottom of your wall boards to stand on. On the outside leave a bit hanging out and then fold it down over the base and use your cladding to hold it. I have used 6 inch wood gravel boards all round the base of mine, fitted so the bottom of them is 1 inch below the faceplate to concrete joint, over the aforementioned dpm flap. Use batters the same width then featherboards, with the bottom of the first one overlapping the gravel boards by about an inch or so.
 

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
48
Reaction score
5
Location
chaddesden derby
T
Finished wall from inside to out.
Finish, plywood, vapour barrier, insulation, breather membrane, battens, cladding.

Temptation once you have the frame up is to bang on the osb/ply, membrane, cladding. Then get a door on and use it. I made this mistake. If you’re going to insulate it then this will cause a problem, if your not going to insulate or internally finish then it fine.

I was pointed at Mike’s thread, skimmed it, thought I knew better, now I’ve gone to insulate and I’m left in a quandary.

Fitz
[/QUOTE

Could you please explain why this way is so important for the wall layers as I am planning on internally finishing and insulating it. What way did you do it and what problems did you run into. Thanks
 

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
48
Reaction score
5
Location
chaddesden derby
Finished wall from inside to out.
Finish, plywood, vapour barrier, insulation, breather membrane, battens, cladding.

Temptation once you have the frame up is to bang on the osb/ply, membrane, cladding. Then get a door on and use it. I made this mistake. If you’re going to insulate it then this will cause a problem, if your not going to insulate or internally finish then it fine.

I was pointed at Mike’s thread, skimmed it, thought I knew better, now I’ve gone to insulate and I’m left in a quandary.

Fitz

Could you please explain why this way is so important for the wall layers as I am planning on internally finishing and insulating it. What way did you do it and what problems did you run into. Thanks
 

Latest posts

Top