Evolution circ. saw with track or Mac plunge saw?

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accipiter

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Need some guidance/input from members that have used the Evolution circ saw (with tracks) and the Macallister plunge track saw please. More use from a circ saw or a plunge saw?

I've been looking at lots of the Evolution tools ads coming up in my Facebook feed, confusing myself -hence asking.

Tempted to buy the Evolution 185 circ saw with track bundle with 2 x 1400 tracks - just under £180. I'm also tempted with one of their mitre saws (255+) 300 DB... but could get away with a single bevel and not so wide cut but its always nice to have wider if the need comes up... Back to subject.

I've been contemplating getting a track saw/plunge saw for some time and have watched @petermillard 's 10MW videos on them. Tempted with the Mac one which B&Q have at £130 but now I'm dithering over the purchase of Evolution circ saw with track, advertised as with a multipurpose blade, or going for the Mac plunge saw and track? £50 'ish difference.

Which would be more useful ? The circ or plunge?

TIA
 
evolution run slower than standard as they are designed for multimaterial use, so you may struggle getting the cleanest of cuts. I have a evolution circular saw and a basic mitre saw, I wouldn't knock them for the price, but they are not fine woodwork tools, I'm never 100% confident of the angles from my mitre saw for instance. I've used a mac mitre saw and found it to be junk, a good blade to be fair, but the fence broke with very little provocation and its now useless. I've used a mac drill and the chuck broke.

It obviously depends on your budget and your use but I'd not have high expectations from either brand so would be looking to spend a bit more

As for whether a circular saw or a plunge saw would be more use it depends on what you are doing, if it is primarily board work, go for a plunge saw,
 
evolution run slower than standard as they are designed for multimaterial use, so you may struggle getting the cleanest of cuts. I have a evolution circular saw and a basic mitre saw, I wouldn't knock them for the price, but they are not fine woodwork tools, I'm never 100% confident of the angles from my mitre saw for instance. I've used a mac mitre saw and found it to be junk, a good blade to be fair, but the fence broke with very little provocation and its now useless. I've used a mac drill and the chuck broke.

It obviously depends on your budget and your use but I'd not have high expectations from either brand so would be looking to spend a bit more

As for whether a circular saw or a plunge saw would be more use it depends on what you are doing, if it is primarily board work, go for a plunge saw,
Thanks for responding.
I'm now at 72 years young so the kit won't get a lot of use as not used for professional trades work. It/they will be used for various jobs of cutting so not just primarily boards.
The Evolution are offered with a fine tooth blade as well as the 'multipurpose' which, they say and show, will cut through nails and some other metals.
 
I have the Evo & track and can't fault it with decent blades, not the multi purpose one. Saws costing 2, 3, or 4 times more will be better, maybe, but for the average user how much better?
Thanks for your reply.
Maybe these blades have been updated since you bought yours Phil? The new ads for corded and battery operated show blades cutting through nails, copper pipe, (mild?) steel and aluminium in the promo videos. Plus stone/masony stuff *with a masonry blade*.
I'll be less than average use I guess 😉
 
Hi, I've got the Evolution circular saw with the tracks as I cut wood and metal. I can't fault the results or the saw and track and I've had them for about 3 years now. Like others have said, it's not for fine woodworking so...horses for courses really.
 
Hi, I've got the Evolution circular saw with the tracks as I cut wood and metal. I can't fault the results or the saw and track and I've had them for about 3 years now. Like others have said, it's not for fine woodworking so...horses for courses really.
Thanks for the positive response and review of the circ saw. Having had circ saws in the past I can't say I found many if any suitable for 'fine' woodworking 😉. Always had to allow for clean up of the cut edge after use.
 
Thanks for the positive response and review of the circ saw. Having had circ saws in the past I can't say I found many if any suitable for 'fine' woodworking 😉. Always had to allow for clean up of the cut edge after use.
Whereas pretty much any plunge saw /tracksaw will give you a glue-ready finish right off the blade, in my experience.

Horses for courses really - how often are you likely to need to cut through multi materials, or indeed get a glue-ready finish right off the blade? I had the evolution for this comparison video and was underwhelmed; if dust collection is a consideration then I wouldn’t even consider a circular saw, personally.

HTH. P
 
Thanks for your reply.
Maybe these blades have been updated since you bought yours Phil? The new ads for corded and battery operated show blades cutting through nails, copper pipe, (mild?) steel and aluminium in the promo videos. Plus stone/masony stuff *with a masonry blade*.
I'll be less than average use I guess 😉
I doubt it, I bought mine a year or so ago. I work upon the theory that the performance of anything designed to be multi purpose can be bettered by something designed for one purpose. I use a rip blade for ripping and an 80T for sheet goods - many people say that's too fine but it leaves a factory finish on the edges of ply and MDF.
Professional Range TCT Circular Blade 185mm x 80T

not expensive.
 
I doubt it, I bought mine a year or so ago. I work upon the theory that the performance of anything designed to be multi purpose can be bettered by something designed for one purpose. I use a rip blade for ripping and an 80T for sheet goods - many people say that's too fine but it leaves a factory finish on the edges of ply and MDF.
Professional Range TCT Circular Blade 185mm x 80T

not expensive.
Thanks for the further info. Just rechecked and the R185CCSX+ ST2800 comes with a 20T Multi-Material TCT Blade. Probably the same blade when you bought.

Fully understand and accept where you're coming from re multipurpose and 1 purpose - for me that's a given and has been my philosophy.

Appreciate the link to the 80T blade 👍
 
Whereas pretty much any plunge saw /tracksaw will give you a glue-ready finish right off the blade, in my experience.

Horses for courses really - how often are you likely to need to cut through multi materials, or indeed get a glue-ready finish right off the blade? I had the evolution for this comparison video and was underwhelmed; if dust collection is a consideration then I wouldn’t even consider a circular saw, personally.

HTH. P
Thanks Peter. Really appreciate your input and direction to your video and the areas covered in it in regards to the two types of saws. Horses for courses is right but I'm not in a position for buying one of each, wouldn't have the work for both, so need/would like something that is more "versatile" - if that's the right word? - for me to get straight cuts. I already have a big Ryobi EWS-1266 circular saw, old now I know, now feels massively heavy.

FULLY accept the safety aspect of the plunge saw over the (any) circular saw. 1000% - no doubts on that score. Used to sell power tools, full range: bandsaws, table saws, planer/thicknesser, routers, lathes etc., etc., and ALWAYS stressed/pointed out safety. Also worked on a spindle moulder at a pine furniture factory so, again, safety was always paramount.

All that said, with you having covered the spring/tension for a plunge saw that makes me doubtful of one being suitable for *my* use in respect of holding/pressing down to make the plunge and cuts. At 72+ I'm now showing signs of age regards strength... - less of than I used to have 😉. If I need to do any cut outs (few a far between id have to say), as you mentioned in your video, I'd resort to other tools although appreciate you pointing out the ease of doing them with a plunge saw.

Again, really appreciate your input and help/direction 👍🙂
 
Hi, I've got the Evolution circular saw with the tracks as I cut wood and metal. I can't fault the results or the saw and track and I've had them for about 3 years now. Like others have said, it's not for fine woodworking so...horses for courses really.
Ditto. Would add that the dust extraction is much that one expects for a circular saw. I've been using the supplied multi purpose blade but normally only in need of a straight glue ready edge. Particularly bought it for cutting 8x4 foot sheets of 18mm MDF.
 
Whereas pretty much any plunge saw /tracksaw will give you a glue-ready finish right off the blade, in my experience.

Horses for courses really - how often are you likely to need to cut through multi materials, or indeed get a glue-ready finish right off the blade? I had the evolution for this comparison video and was underwhelmed; if dust collection is a consideration then I wouldn’t even consider a circular saw, personally.

HTH. P
I do cut through different materials and just find it useful. Maybe not the greatest thing in the world...but there ya go
 
I do cut through different materials and just find it useful. Maybe not the greatest thing in the world...but there ya go
I've had and used a few different makes of circ. saws over the past 50+ years (54?) and found them all much the same.

Been tempted to try a plunge saw after seeing quite a few in use in videos on YouTube - and comparison reviews/videos. Kept putting off getting one because of my small workshop come general storage area and don't see me having the work for it - not at some of the hefty price tags for the "good ones" like Festool. Cheapest found is the Mac... but... even watching reviews.

I also have to cut any 8x4 sheets outside because of the limited free workshop area and have done so outside without track - just clamping a wooden straight-edge to guide which doesn't always stay in place.

This Evolution bundle is tempting and, although I read through the reviews on the website showing pretty good comments, just wanted to hear from others direct.

If I buy I've 45 days to return it if I don't find it being what I'm after.
 
A circular saw and length of angle iron which I used to use is going to be straight and no fuss compared to cheap tracks and joints. For me the biggest advantage of my Makita is in the ease and speed of setup compared to aligning a clamping a heavy length of angle but once in place the results are the same.
 
I have many of the Evo tools. Including the track saw and mitre saw. I bought the fine wood blade for woodwork. And use the multi blade for everything else. There are deals from time to time which make the Evo kit very attractive. Also if you phone them you get real people. All tech help is free. Alan knows all of their tools inside out and has helped me on numerous occasions.
Their warranty is also great. 3 years on saws and they collect, repair and return in a few days if you ever need it.
 
My one comment/complaint with the EVO is the (sort of) F style clamps used to hold the track steady. I feel they're a bit flimsy. I don't often over tighten things but these are so easily over tightened and bend. They don't need to be too tight as the rubber strips under the track really do stop them moving around but IMHO the clamps could be better. Otherwise I'm pretty happy with the EVO.
 
I've read the same complaint about more expensive stuff. I put countersunk screw holes in my track to screw it down when cutting 9" x 3"s on a skew (while working single handed from a wheelchair). It's construction timber so any drift was far more important than the screw holes.
 
I have the Evo circ saw and tracks and I’m in love-hate relationship with it. Ive upgraded the blade for finer woodworking cuts. It’s mostly fine. But to echo everyone else - not for fine woodwork. I’ve had a hell of a time with the splinter strips coming off - which is a real pain and makes it difficult to get accurate cuts. I order new strips direct from evolution and the glue was already slimey when they arrived so didn’t stay stuck. Got my money back - but I’ve been cleaning off and using contact adhesive…. It’s a real hassle. Maybe I’ve just been unlucky. The dust collection is poor too. All that said - it’s enabled me to make things that I’ve wanted - even if ive had to do extra steps to sort out the edges at times. Thinking about upgrading to a cordless plunge.
 
I have the Evo circ saw and tracks and I’m in love-hate relationship with it. Ive upgraded the blade for finer woodworking cuts. It’s mostly fine. But to echo everyone else - not for fine woodwork. I’ve had a hell of a time with the splinter strips coming off - which is a real pain and makes it difficult to get accurate cuts. I order new strips direct from evolution and the glue was already slimey when they arrived so didn’t stay stuck. Got my money back - but I’ve been cleaning off and using contact adhesive…. It’s a real hassle. Maybe I’ve just been unlucky. The dust collection is poor too. All that said - it’s enabled me to make things that I’ve wanted - even if ive had to do extra steps to sort out the edges at times. Thinking about upgrading to a cordless plunge.
You can use Makita splinter strips on the evolution rails as another option
 
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